Skip to main content

Full text of "Osteopathy Complete"

See other formats


M/^ 






Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/osteopathycompleOOelme 



Osteopathy Complete, 



BY 



ELIVIER D. BARBER, D.O., 

Graduate of the American School 
of Osteopathy. 



oJhmcna, Sa^. 



Fully Illustrated. 







Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1898, by 

ELMER D. BARBER, D.O., 

In the office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington, D. C. 

All rights reserved. 



PRESS OF 

HUDSON-KIMBERLY PUBLISHING CO. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



Preface. 



In presenting Osteopatlty Complete to the student and practi- 
tioner we feel that we are entering a field comparatively new, and 
upon which very little has been written. 

The word "osteopathy," signifying bone-disease, is a misnomer, 
and is in itself misleading. It was coined by the discoverer of a few 
of the fundamental principles of this new science of healing. 

The human system is, to all intents and purposes, a wonderful 
machine, capable of running for an indefinite period of time, unless 
interfered with by accidents, dislocations, contraction of muscles, 
obstruction of the nerve-force, or the circulation of the nutritive 
fluids of the body. 

The heart is compared to a double force-pump, driving the blood 
through the arteries, or irrigating channels, which pervade the most 
hidden recesses of the entire body; the veins collecting it from the 
capillaries and returning it to the heart. 

The brain is compared to a dynamo which generates, and trans- 
mits by way of the nerves the forces which control and give vitality 
to every tissue and organ of the body. 

Osteopathy is based upon a thorough knowledge of anatomy and 
physiology, and enables the skilled operator to reduce dislocations, 
or, by mechanical methods, to keep free the wonderful forces and 
nutritive fluids of the body so essential to true physiological condi- 
tions; and that its methods are efficacious in the treatment of many 
diseases which have baffled the skill of almost all other methods, 
which have been tried and proven to be of no avail, can be attested 
by thousands who have been restored to health and usefulness by 
an application of its principles. 

With an earnest desire to advance the cause of Osteopathy, and 
place it before the public in its true light: at the request of students 



^/ /O \ 



iv PREFACE. 

and practitioners, we have thrust aside the veil of mj^stery in which 
it has been shrouded by its discoverer and his associates. 

Such standard worlis as Gx'ay, Landois, Saunders, and Musser, 
which should be in the library of every osteopath, have been freely 
consulted. 

The author has endeavored to be accurate, concise, and modern, 
and to merit in the future the firm support and encouragement 
received in the past. 

We are deeply indebted to Dr. Helen M. Barber for many valu- 
able suggestions; also to Dr. Sanford T. Lyne for valuable assistance 
in the classification of diseases. We are also deeply indebted to 
Dr. Andrew B. Knutson for valuable assistance, preparation of index 
and treatise upon dietetics. 

Elmer D. Barber, D.O. 



Contents. 



INTRODUCTION — 

Osteopathy 9 

Cardinal Principles. ... 11 

Skeleton Adjustment. . 12 

Glandular Activity. . .. 14 
Free Circulation of the 

Blood 16 

Coordination of Nerve- 
Force 20 

PRELIMINARY MISCEL- 
LANEA.— 
Researches of Dr. Elmer D. 

Barber 25 

Osteopathy in a Nutshell. . 31 
How to Apply Osteopathy . 34 

Table.— Clothing 

Manipulation. — Pressure 

on Nerve-Centers. ... 35 
In Acute Cases. — In 

Chronic Cases 

Vibration 36 

How to Make the Examin- 
ation 37 

Eleven Important Ques- 
tions Answered 40 

Man as a Machine 44 

Bones of the Human Skel- 
eton 47 

DISEASES IN GENERAL — 

The Lungs 51 

General Description. . . . 

Apex 

Base 52 

Borders 

Anterior 

Posterior 

Surfaces 

Inner 

External 

Root 



Substance. — Cells. — 
Tubes 53 

Blood-Yessels 

Pulmonary Artery. . . 
Pulmonai-y Capillaries. 54 
Pulmonary Veins. . . . 
Bronchial Arteries. . .. 

Bronchial Veins 55 

Lymphatics 

Nerves 

Explanatory: Principles 
in treating diseases of 
the organs of respira- 
tion 56 

DISEASES OF THE BRON- 
CHL LUNGS, AND 
PLEUR.E.— 

Asthma 60 

Vibration 67 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis, 

Consumption 68 

Acute Bronchitis 75 

Chronic Bronchitis 79 

Capillary Bronchitis 

Fibrinous Bronchitis.. .. 80 

Putrid Bronchitis 

Bronchiectasis 88 

Catarrhal Pne u m o n i a , 

Broncho-Pneumonitis. .. 
Acute Miliary Tuberculosis 84 
Interstitial Pneumonitis. . 85 
Pulmonary Emphysema.. . 
Pulmonary Congestion.. .. 

Pulmonary Edema 87 

Pulmonary Abscess 

Pulmonary Thrombosis and 

Embolism 88 

Pulmonary Gangrene. . . . 
Croupous Pneumonia, Lung 

Fever 

Pneumothorax 90 



CONTENTS. 



Acute Pleurisy 90 

Chronic Pleurisy .... . . 96 

Empyema 

Hydrotliorax 97 

Hemotboi'ax 

Intercostal Neuralgia, Pleu- 
rodynia 

Diaphragmatic Pleurisy . . 98 

DISEASES OF THE HEART 
AND BLOOD - V E S- 
SELS.— 

The Heart 104 

General Description.. .. 
Innervation of the Heart. 105 

Cardiac Plexus 

The Blood-Vessels. . . . 106 

Arteries 

V6ins.' Ill 

Explanatory: Princi- 
ples in treating dis- 
eases of the heart. . .. 
Enlargement of the Heart.. 113 
Feeble Acti on of the 

Heart 114 

Treatment to Equalize 

the Circulation 

Valvular Disease of the 

Heart IIT 

Cardiac Dilatation 118 

Cardiac Hypertrophy. . . . 

Cardiac Vertigo 

Cardiac Malformation .... 119 

Dextrocardia 

Tachycardia 

Angina Pectoris 120 

Endocarditis 

Pericarditis 

Myocarditis 121 

Hydropericardium 

Cardiac Thrombosis 

Thoracic Aneurism 122 

Arterio-Capillary Fibrosis.. 
Cardiac Functional Distur- 
bance 

Varicose Veins, Varix. . .. 123 

Phlebitis 124 

Anasarca, General Dropsy. 125 

DISEASES OF THE BLOOD.— 
Anemia 128 



Chlorosis, Green Sickness. 128 

DISEASES OF THE LYM- 
PHATIC SYSTEM.— 

Lymphatic Circulation. . .. 129 
Leucocythemia, Leukemia, 

White Blood ISI 

Lymphadenoma, H o d g- 
kin's Disease, Pseudo- 
Leukemia 132 

DISEASES OF THE STOM- 
ACH, INTESTINES, 
AND PERITONEUM.— 

The Stomach 132 

General Description. . . . 
Cardiac Opening.— Fun- 
dus.— Surfaces.— Bor- 
ders.— Pylorus 133 

Movements r34 

Nerves 135 

Nerve-Influence 136 

Vomiting (Physiology of).. 137 

The Intestines 138 

Small Intestine 139 

Large Intestine 

Movements of the Intes- 
tines 

Nerve-Influence on. . . . 140 
Effect of Nerves on the 

Rectum 143 

Excretion of Fecal Mat- 
ter 

Explanatory: Object of 
entering into the above 

anatomy 144 

Examiiiing loatient. — Mus- 
cles at fault.— Imagin- 
ary dislocations. . . . 145 
To ascertain the cause 
of disease of the tho- 
rax or abdomen. . . . 

Constipation 147 

Examination 150 

Accessory Treatment. . 153 
Acute Gastritis, Indiges- 
tion.— Chronic Gastritis, 

Dyspepsia 156 

Gastralgia 160 

Gastrectasia 163 

Gastric Carcinoma 164 



CONTENTS. 



Vll 



Gastric Ulcer 164 

Gastric Neurosis 165 

Gastric Vertigo 166 

Acute Enteritis 167 

Chronic Enteritis, Intesti- 
nal Catarrh 168 

Cholera Morbus 171 

Explanatory 172 

Digestion 

Peristaltic Action, . . . 173 
The Splanchnic and 
Pneumogastric. . . . 17-t 
Cramp in the Bowels. . . . 177 

Cholera Infantum 178 

Cramp in the Stomach, and 

Vomiting 181 

Chronic Diarrhea 182 

Flux, Acute Dysentery. . .. 183 

Chronic Dysentery 

Appendicitis 184 

Typhlitis 187 

Perityphlitis 187 

Enteroptosis 188 

Intussusception 

Intestinal Obstruction.. .. 189 
Intestinal Carcinoma. . . . 
Intestinal Tuberculosis... 190 
Intestinal Amyloid Degen- 
eration 

Intestinal Parasites. . 

Cestodes, Tape- Worms. . 

Tenia Solium. — Tenia 

Mediocanellata.-Both- 

riocephalus Latus.. . . 

Nematodes, Round- 

Worms 

Lumbricoides.— Oxyuris 
Vermicularis. — Trich- 
ina Spiralis 

Acute Peritonitis 

Chronic Peritonitis 192 

Ascites 

Peritoneal Carcinoma. . . . 
Peritoneal Tuberculosis . . 193 

DISEASES OF THE LIV- 
ER.— 

The Liver 194 

General Description . . . . 
Capsule. — Lobules. — 
Cells 



Bile-Ducts.— Bile 195 

Gall-Bladder 196 

Blood-Vessels 

Hepatic Artery 

Branches 

Portal Vein 

Branches 197 

Nerves 

Functions 198 

Explanatory: Object of 
entering into above 

anatomy 199 

Acute Lithemia, Bilious- 
ness, Torpid Liver. . . . 

Chronic Lithemia 204 

Icterus, Jaundice 

Malignant Jaundice, Acute 

Yellow Atrophy 207 

Hepatic Congestion 

Acute Hepatitis 

Hepatic Abscess 208 

Hepatic Cirrhosis 209 

Hepatic Fatty Infiltration, 

Fatty Liver 

Hepatic Amyloid Degener- 
ation 210 

Hepatic Carcinoma 

Hepatic Hydatid Cyst. . . . 

Perihepatitis 213 

Cholecystitis, Cholangitis. . 
Biliary Calcu 1 i , G a 1 1 - 

Stones 214 

Catarrhal Jaundice 

Hepatic Colic 215 

DISEASES OF THE PAN- 
CREAS.— 

The Pancreas 216 

General Description. — 
Capsule.— Ducts.— Con- 
dition of Blood-Vessels. 

Nerves 217 

Secretion 

Acute Pancreatitis 218 

Suppurative Pancreatitis.. 221 
Pancreatic Cyst 

DISEASES OF THE 
SPLEEN.— 

The Spleen 222 

General Description. . . . 



CONTENTS. 



Blood-Vessels 223 

Splenic Artery 

Splenic Vein 

Function 

Splenitis 

Splenic Hypertropliy .... 224 
Splenic Hydatid Cyst. . . . 225 
Floating Spleen 226 

DISEASES OF THE KID- 
NEYS.— 

Tlie Kidneys 

General Description. — 

Relations 229 

Blood-Vessels 

Nerves 

Nerve-Influence on.. .. 231 
Explanatory: Calling at- 
tentioU' of osteopath to 
blood- and nerve-supply 

of the liidneys 232 

Anury, Anuria, Anuresis, 
Renal Inadequacy. . . . 

Albuminuria 23B 

Chyluria 234 

Hematuria 

Hemaglobinuria 235 

Lipuria 

Pyuria 236 

Oxaluria 237 

Uremia 

Renal Congestion 238 

Acute Exudative and Pro- 
ductive Nephritis, Acute 
Bright's Disease. . . . 239 
Chronic Exudative and 
Productive Nephritis, 
Chronic Bright's Dis- 
ease 240 

Diabetes Insipidus, Poly- 
uria 241 

Diabetes Mellitus, Glycos- 
uria 242 

Paroxysmal Hemoglobin- 

■ uria 245 

Pyelitis 246 

Renal Calculus, Nephro- 
lithiasis 247 

Hydronephrosis 

Chronic Interstitial Neph- 
ritis 248 



Renal Amyloid Degenera- 
tion, Waxy Liver. . . . 249 

Renal Tuberculosis 

Renal Carcinoma 

Renal Hydatid Cyst 

Renal Abscess 250 

Perirenal Abscess 2'5l 

Floating Kidney 

Addison's Disease 252 

FEVERS AND INFEC- 
TIOUS DISEASES.— 
The Vaso-Motor Center. . 258 
Explanatory: Why the 
osteopath prefers chron- 
ic cases 255 

Ardent Fever 256 

Thermic Fever, Sunstroke, 

Insolation 257 

Simple Continued Fever. . 258 
La Grippe, Influenza, Ca- 
tarrhal Fever 259 

Hay Fever 260 

Malarial Fever, Ague. . . . 261 
Cerebro-Spinal Fever, Spot- 
ted Fever, Cerebro-Spi- 

, nal Meningitis 262 

Typhus Fever 264 

Typhoid Fever, Enteric 

Fever 265 

Weil's Disease 260 

Yellow Fever 

Asiatic Cholera 

Scarlet Fever, Scarlatina.. 267 
Rotheln, Roseola, Rubella, 
Spurious Scarlet Fever, 
False Measles, Bastard 
Measles, German Meas- 
les, French Measles . . 268 
Morbilli, Rubeola, Measles.. 
Pertussis, Wh o o p i n g - 

Cough 269 

Parotiditis, Mumps . . . . 270 

Variola, Small-Pox 

Varicella, Chicken-Pox. . 271 

Erysipelas 

Dengue 272 

Diphtheria 273 

Brain Fever . . . . 276 

Explanatory: Consider- 
ing the brain and the 
circulation 



CONTENTS. 



Tuberculosis 278 

Miliary Fever 279 

Leprosy, Elephantiasis. . .. 

Hydrophobia, Rabies.. .. 

Anthrax, Splenic Fever, 
Charbon 280 

Milk-Sickness, (Swa m p - 
Sickness, The T r e m - 
bles) 

Trichinosis, Trich i n i s i s 
(The Flesh- Worm Dis- 
ease) 

Glanders 281 

Actinomycosis. Lump-Jaw.. 

Foot-and-Mouth Dis ease 
(Eczema Epizootlca).. . 

Syphilis 282 

CONSTITUTIONAL D I S - 
EASES.— 

General Debility 282 

Acute Articular Rheuma- 
tism, Rheumatic Fever. 284 

Subacute Articular Rheu- 
matism 294 

Chronic Articular Rheuma- 
tism 

Acute Miiscular Rheuma- 
tism 295 

Chronic Muscular Rheu- 
matism 296 

Torticollis, Wryneck, Stiff 
Neck 

Sciatica, Sciatic Rheuma- 
tism 297 

Lumbago 

Rheumatoid Ar t h r 1 1 1 s . 
Rheumatic Gout 303 

Acute Gout 

Chronic Gout 805 

Scrofula 

Myxedema 306 

General Treatment 

Hemophilia (Spontaneous 
Bleeding) .308 

Simple Goiter 

Explanatory : Descrip- 
tion of the thyroid 
gland 

Fleshy Tumors 310 



Scorbutus, Scurvy 310 

Purpura. Land Scurvy, 
The Purples, (Canadian) 
Blackleg 311 

DISEASES OF THE NERV- 
OUS SYSTEM.— 

Neuralgia 312 

Tic-Douloureux 315 

Headache 

Nervous Headache 321 

Sick Headache 

Migraine, Megrim. Sun- 
Pain 322 

Singultus, Hiccup 823 

Explanatory: Concern- 
ing the diaphragm. . . . 

Neuromata 324 

Neuritis 

Multiple Neuritis 825 

Neuro - Paralytic Hyper- 
emia 

Paresis 326 

Paralysis, Palsy 

Brief Reference to the 
Nervous System and 

Spine 327 

How to Make the Ex- 
amination 328 

Atrophy (Shrinking of mus- 
cles) 333 

Spinal Anemia 334 

Spinal Hyperemia 335 

Acute Spinal Meningitis. .. 
Chronic Spinal Meningitis. 336 
Cervical Pachymeningitis. . 
Extra - Meningeal Hemor- 
rhage 337 

Spinal Compression 

Spinal Tumor 341 

Syringomyelia S42 

Acute Myelitis 

Chronic Myelitis 843 

Hematomyelia 

Anterior Poliomyelitis. . . . 
Locomotor Ataxia, Poste- 
rior Spinal Sclerosis. . 344 
Primary Spastic Paraple- 
gia 347 

Congenital Spastic Paraple- 
gia 348 



CONTENTS. 



Ataxic Paraplegia, Prima^ 
ry Lateral Sclerosis. . 348 

Hereditary Ataxia, Fried- 
reich's Disease 

Progressive Muscular Atro- 
phy, Amotrophic Lat- 
eral Sclerosis 349 

Pseudo-Hypertrophic Mus- 
cular Paralysis 

Simple Idiopathic Muscu- 
lar Atrophy 

Arthritic Muscular Atro- 

pliy 

Myotonia Congenita, 
Thomsen's Disease. . .. 351 

Analgesic Panaris, M o r - 
van's Disease 352 

Acute Ascending Paralysis. 

Cerebral Anemia 

Cerebral Hyperemia. . . . 353 

Cerebral Meningitis 354 

Cerebral Tubercular Men- 
ingitis 

Cerebritis, Encephal i t i s , 
Phrenitis 

Apoplexy, Cerebral Hem- 
orrhage 

Cerebral Embolism and 
Thrombosis 355 

Acute Cerebral Softening. . 

Chronic Cerebral Soften- 
ing 356 

Cerebral Tumor 

Cerebral Abscess 

Infantile Hemiplegia. . . . 

Cerebro-Spinal Sclerosis. . 357 

Glosso - Labio - Laryngeal 
Paralysis, Bulbar Par- 
alysis 

Paralysis Agitans, Shaking 
Palsy 

Paretic Dementia 358 

Insanity.'. 

Epilepsy ("Falling Sick- 
ness." "Fits") 359 

Dislocation of the Atlas.. 360 
And How to Reduce It.. 

Chorea, St. Vitus' Dance.. 365 

Hydrocephalus 360 

Intracranial Aneurism. . . . 



Neurasthenia, Nervous De- 
bility, Nervous Prostra- 
tion 367 

Hysteria. 3'68 

Exophthalm i c Goiter, 
Grave's Disease— Base- 
dow's Disease 

Local Asphyxia, Symmet- 
rical Gangrene, R a y- 

naud's Disease 370 

Writer's Cramp 

Tetanus, Trismus, Lock- 
Jaw 376 

Tetanilla, Tetany 381 

Plumbism 

Delirium Tremens 382 

Insomnia 

Stammering 383 

Impotency 384 

DISEASES OF THE EYE, 
EAR , NOSE, AND 
THROAT.— 

Explanatory: Causes of, 
and the great success 
in treating diseases of 
the above organs. . . . 388 

General Treatment of the 
Neck 393 

Diseases of the Eye. 

Trachoma, Granular Lids 
(Granulated Eyelids) . . 394 

Inflammation of the Eyes.. 397 

Catarrhal Conjunctivitis. . .398 

Phlyctenular Conjunctivi- 
tis 

D i ff u s e Parenchymatous 
Keratitis 399 

Acute Phlyctenular Kera- 
titis 

Iritis 

Scleritis 

Episcleritis 

Ciliary Blepharitis 400 

Dacryocystitis 

Tenonitis 

Pterygium 

Leucoma, Albugo 401 

Pannus 

Cataract 



CONTENTS. 



Strabismus, Crossed Eyes . 402 
Myopia, Myopy, Near- 
Sightedness (Short- 
Siglitedness, Purblind- 

ness) 

Dripping Eyes 

Diseases of the Ear. 
Acute Catarrlial Otitis 

Media, Earache 403 

Clironic Catarrlial Otitis 

Media 405 

Aural Vertigo, Meniere's 

Disease 

Deafness 

Catarrhal Deafness and 

Roaring in the Head. . 406 
Otomyces, Otomycosis. . . . 

Otoueus 

Otopyosis ' . . 

Otorrhagia 

Diseases of the Nose. 

Coryza, Acute Rhinitis, 
Acute Nasal Catarrh, 
Cold in the Head.. .. 40J 

Chronic Hypertrophic 
Rhinitis 408 

Diphtheritic Rhinitis. . . . 411 

Chronic Post-Nasal Rhin- 
itis 

Rhinitis Sycca, Dry Ca- 
tarrh 

Atrophic Rhinitis, Ozena. 412 

Rhinolith, Nasal Calculus. 

Nasal Polypi (Polypus of 
the Nose) 

Nasal Tupiors 413 

Nasal Ulcers 

Idiopathic Rhinorrhea. . . . 

Antrum Abscess 

Epistaxis, Nose- Bleed. . 414 

Diseases of the Throat. 
Acute Laryngitis, Laryn- 
geal Catarrh 

Diphtheritic Laryngitis. . . 415 

Chronic Laryngitis 416 

Laryngeal Edema 

Tuberculous Laryngitis. . 417 
Submucous Laryngitis. . .. 



Phlegmonous Laryngitis, 
Perichondritis 418 

Laryngismus Stridulus, 
Laryngospasm 

Pseudo-Membranous Lar- 
yngi t i s , lilembranous 
Croup 419 

Spasmodic Croup, Ca- 
tarrhal Croup 420 

Laryngeal Tumor 

Laryngeal Syphilis 421 

Acute Pharyngitis, Sore 
Throat 

Chronic Pharyngitis . . . . 422 

Gangrenous Pharyngitis, 
Putrid Sore Throat. . . . 

Retro-Pharyngeal Abscess 423 

Trachitis. 

Trachelagra 424 

Trachelismus 

Tracheal Stenosis 

Acute Esophagitis 

Chronic Esophagitis. . . . 425 

Esophageal Abscess.. .. 

Esophageal Stricture. . . . 426 

Esophageal Dilatation. . . . 

Follicular Tonsillitis. . . . 

Parenchymatous Tonsillit- 
is. Amygdalitis. Quinsy. 427 

Chronic Tonsillitis, En- 
larged Tonsils 

Herpetic Tonsillitis, Her- 
petic Sore Throat. . . . 428 

Glossitis 

Glossanthrax 429 

Glossophytia. N-i gri t i es, 
Blacli Tongue 

Leulioplakia Lingualis. . . . 

Glpssal Ulcer 

Simple. — Dyspeptic. — 
Catarrhal. — Aphthous. 
— Traumatic 

Catarrhal Stomatitis. . . . 430 

Aphthous Stomatitis, Aph- 
thae 

Ulcerative Stomatitis, 
Noma 431 

Gangrenous Stomat i t i s , 

Cancrum Oris 

Parasitic Stomatitis, 
Thrush 



CONTENTS. 



Stomatitis Materna, Nurs- 
ing Sore Throat 432 

Mercurial Stomatitis Ptyal- 
ism, Salivation 

DISEASES OF THE SKIN.— 
Eczema (Scald-Head, Salt- 
Rheum, Moist or Run- 
ning Tetter) 433 

Rash 

Boils 4S4 

Pimples 

Carbuncle 

Paronychia, Panaritium, 

^SVJiitlow, Felon 435 

Dermatomycosis 436 

Dermatorrhea 

Other Skin Diseases.. .. 
DISEASES OF THE BLAD- 
DER.— ' 

The Bladder 437 

General Description. . . . 
Ligaments. — Blood-Ves- 
sels. — Nerves. — Clos- 
ure 438 

Urine Accumulation and 

Micturition 439 

Nerves Concerned in the 
Retention and Evacua- 
tion of the Urine. . . . 440 

Cystitis 

Interstitial Cystitis 441 

Vesical Calculus 

Vesical Neoplasm 442 

Retention of Urine 

Incontinence of Urine, En- 
uresis, Bed-Wetting. . 443 
Dysuria 444 

DISEASES OF THE REC- 
TUM AND ANUS.— 

Diseases of the Rectum. 

Proctitis 445 

Hemorrhoids, Piles 446 

Dislocation of the Coccyx 477 

And How to Reduce It. 

Rectal Carcinoma 448 

Rectal Ulcer 

Diseases of the Anns. 
Prolapsus Ani 



Fistula in Ano 449 

Complete Fistula 

Incomplete External Fis- 
tula 450 

Incomplete Internal Fis- 
tula 

Anal Fissure 

DISEASES OF THE BONES 
AND JOINTS.— 

Spondylitis, Spinal Ostitis, 
Spinal Caries, Pott's 
Disease 451 

Spinal Curvature (Anterior, 
Lordosis. — Posterior, 
Kyphosis. Humpback. — 
Lateral, Scoliosis). . . . 452 

Rickets, Rachitis 4.54 

Cretinism 456 

Akromegalia 

Arthritis (in shoulder- joint; 
anj'- other joint of arm; 
hip-joint ; any other 
joint of leg) . 457 

Synovitis 458 

Coxalgia, Hip-.Toint Dis- 
ease 459 

Femoral. — Acetabular. — 
Arthritic. — Inflamma- 
tory. — Effusive. — Sup- 
purative 

Hydrarthrosis, "White 
Swelling 460 

Anchylosis, Stiff Joint. ... 461 
True.— Complete. —Incom- 
plete 

False 

Sprains 

GYNFCOLOGV — DISEASES 
OF WOMEN.- 

The Uterus 46S 

General Description. . . . 
Body. — Fundus. — Cer- 
vix. — Ligaments. . . . 464 

Cavity 465 

Blood-Vessels 

Arteries.— Veins 

Nerves 

At Puberty 

During Menstruation.. .. 466 



CONTENTS. 



Displacements of the 

Uterus 466 

Prolapsus. — Relaxation. 

— Procidentia 

Retroversion. — Antever- 
sion. — Inversion. — 
Anteflexion. — Retro- 
flexion 

Dislocation of the Lumbar 

Vertebrae 470 

And How to Reduce It. 

Anteversion 471 

Anteflexion 472 

Retroversion 

Retroflexion 473 

Lateroflexion 

Compound Flexions. . 

Inversion 474 

Prolapsus Uteri 

Amenorrhea 

Ogliomenorrhea 476 

Menorrhagia 

Metrorrhagia 477 

Dysmenorrhea 478 

Neuralgic Dysmenorrhea.. 

Obstructive Dysmenorrhea. 

Congestive Dysmenorrhea . 

Membranous Dysmenor- 
rhea 479 

Ovarian Dysmenorrhea. . . . 

Leucorrhea, The Whites, 
Uterine Catarrh.. .. 480 

Uterine Malformation. . . . 481 

Acute ^letritis 

Chronic Metritis, Areolar 
Hyperplasia. Diffuse In- 
terstitial Hypertrophy 482 

Acute Endometritis 483 

Chronic Corporeal Endome- 
tritis 

Endocervicitis 

Cervical Hypertrophy .... 484 

Cervical Stenosis 

Cervical Laceration. . . . 485 

Uterine Atrophy 

Uterine Fibroid Tumor. . 

Uterine Polypus 486 

Uterine Carcinoma 

Uterine Sarcoma 487 

Salpingitis 

Ovaritis 488 



Ovarian Hemorrhage.. .. 488 

Ovarian Prolapsus 489 

Ovarian Tumor 

Parovarian Cyst 490 

Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis. 

Granular Vaginitis 491 

Specific Vaginitis 492 

Ulcerative Vaginitis. . . . 
Diphtheritic Vaginitis. , , . 
Acute Catarrhal Vulvitis. 493 
Chronic Catarrhal Vulvitis. 
Phlegmonous Vulvitis. . . . 
Diphtheritic Vulvitis. . . . 494 

Follicular Vulvitis 

Gangrenous Vulvitis. . . . 495 
Cyst of ViTlvo-Vaginal 

Gland 

Abscess of Vulvo-Vaginal 

Gland 

Vulvar Eczema 496 

Vulvar Erysipelas 497 

Vulvar Erythema 

Vulvar Hyperesthesia. . . . 

Pruritus Vulvge 498 

Vaginismus 

Acute Pelvic Peritonitis. . 
Chronic Pelvic Peritonitis. 499 

Pelvic Cellulitis 500 

Vesico-Vaginal Fistula.. .. 
Recto- Vaginal Fistula . . . . 

Coccygodynia 501 

Urethral Caruncle 

Prolapsus Urethrse 502 

Prolapsus Vaginae 503 

Vaginal Hernia: Vesico- 
vaginal, Cystocele. — 
Recto- Vaginal, Recto- 
cele. — Entero-Vaginal, 

Enterocele 

Atresia Vaginae 

Pudendal Hernia 504 

Pudendal Hematocele. . . . 
Pundenal Hemorrhage. . .. 505 

Pelvic Hematocele 

Menopause, '' Change of 
Life " . . 

OBSTETRICS — MID- 
WIFERY— 
Male Generative Organs. . 507 
Prostate Gland. — Cow- 
per's Glands 



CONTENTS. 



Penis 508 

Corpora Cavernosa. . . . 
Corpus Spongiosum. — 

Glans Penis 509 

Testes.— Scrotum 

Spermatic Cord: Ar- 
teries, — Nerves 510 

Yesicula? Seminales. — 

Ejaculatory Ducts.. .. 

Female Generative Organs. 511 

External 

Mons Veneris. — Labia 
Majora. — Labia Min- 
ora. — Clitoris. — Mea- 
tus Urinarius. — Orifice 
of the Vagina. — Hy- 
men. — Glands of Bar- 
tholin. — Bulhi Vesti- 

buli.. '. 512 

Internal 

Vagina 

Uterus. — Fa 1 1 o p i a n 

Tubes.— Ovaries. . .. 513 
Ligaments of the Ova- 
ries. — Round Liga- 
ments 514 

Graafian Follicles, Ovi- 
sacs, Graafian Vesi- 
cles 515 

Discharge of the Ovum. 516 
Puberty.— Menstruation.. . 

Erection 517 

Center for Erection.— 

Muscles 518 

Erection in the Female . . 
Emission and Reception of 

the Semen 

Erection of the Uterus. . . . 
Fertilization of the Ovum... 

The Fetus 520 

Nourishment. — Circula- 
tion 

Secretory Organs.— Move- 
ments 521 



Signs of Pregnancy 522 

Labor 

Descent of Uterus 

Secretions.— Changes in 
the Organs. — Contrac- 
tions.— Indications . . . . 523 

First Stage 

Second Stage 524 

Dilatation of the Cer- 
vix.— Water-Bag. . . . 
Abdominal Muscles. — 
Dilatation of Vagina. 525 

Third Stage 

Detachment of the Pla- 
centa.— Effects of La- 
bor on the Mother. . .. 
Arrangement of the 

Bed 520 

Management 

First Stage 

Treatment 527 

Second Stage 

Treatment . 

The Child 

Tying the Cord 

Third Stage 

Treatment 'vSO 

To Deliver the Pla- 
centa 

Management 

Binder 

Washing the Child 531 

Bandage 

Mastitis . 532 

Gathered Breasts 

Phlegmasia 535 

Alba Dolens.— "Milk-Leg".. 
Puerperal Septicemia. . . . 536 

Puerperal Fever 

"Childbed Fever" . . ..... 

Puerperal Mania 537 

DIETETICS — 



List of Cuts. 



Cut No. Page. 
Diploma 26 

1. The Human Skeleton 46 

2. The Human Thorax, and 

Contents (col.) 49 

3. Vibration 57 

4. Expanding the Chest 53 

5. Expanding the Chest 65 

6. Raising Depressed Ribs 69 

7. Spinal Treatment 73 

8. Extension of Neck 77 

9. Expanding the Chest 81 

10. Raising a Rib 91 

11. Raising the Ribs 93 

12. Holding the Phrenic Nerve... 99 

13. Holding the Vaso-Motor 101 

14. The Heart, Lungs, and Great 

Vessels (col.) 107 

15. The Sympathetic Nerve (col.). 141 

16. Reducing Dislocation of Rib. 151 

17. Kneading the Bowels 157 

18. Freeing and Stimulating the 

Pneumogastric Nerve 161 

19. Diarrhea 169 

20. Diarrhea 175 

21. Holding the Splanchnic 

Nerve 179 

22. Appendicitis 185 

23. Extension of the Spine 201 

24. Acute Lithemia 205 



Cut No. Pa^e. 

25. Raising the False Ribs 211 

26. The Duodenum (col.) 219 

27. Raising the Eighth Rib 227 

28. Diabetes Insipidus 243 

29. Rotating Flesh on Leg. 287 

30. Rheumatism in Arm 291 

31. Lumbago 299 

32. Sciatic Rheumatism 301 

33. Headache 313 

34. Headache .....317 

35. Headache— Hclding the Vaso- 

Motor 319 

36. Freeing the Circulation 331 

37. Reducing a Spinal Disloca- 

tion 339 

38. Locomotor Ataxia 3'5 

39. The Cervical Region (col.)... 361 

40. Reducing Dislocation of the 

Atlas ?63 

41 . Raising the Clavicle 373 

42. Brachial Plexus (col.) 373 

43. Writer's Cramp 377 

44. Freeing the Circulation 379 

45. Impotency 385 

46. Treatment of the Neck 389 

47. Treatment of the Neck 3R1 

48. Inflammation of the Eves... 395 

49. Gasserian Ganglion (col.) 409 

50. The Iliac Arteries and Veins 

(col.) 533 



Introduction. 



OSTEOPATHY. 

Osteopathy is a progressive science, and is as yet in its 
infancy. Valuable discoveries are being continually made 
by skillful members of the profession while engaged in 
research and experiment. It does not claim to cure all the 
ills flesh is heir to; neither would it presume to detract from 
the virtues of any other method of healing. It is simply the 
response to the demands of mankind for a therapeutic sci- 
ence eminently superior in points of rationality of method, 
freedom from injury to the patient, and successful results, as 
compared with all other methods in use. Its necessity was 
to a large extent due to the fact that the oldest and most 
general method of practice has had, since the sixteenth 
century, some of the most intellectual men of the world 
engaged in research along the lines of its theory, and still 
claims to have discovered and presented to the world but 
three absolute specifics for the ailments of human-kind, and 
the efficacy of these has not yet been attested by the experi- 
ence of the subjective patients. 

While Osteopathy does not expect to entirely supplant 
materia medica, .its merit has already been established 
beyond any peradventure, and no other method of healing 
has, in so short a time, made such rapid strides into public 
favor and confidence; which is entirely due to its remarkable 
record, which, although a majority of the cases treated were 



10 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

termed chronic, and had previously tried almost all other 
methods without the result of a cure, shows about ninety per 
cent of the cases treated benefited, seventy-five per cent 
completely cured, while only ten per cent received no relief, 
and not one injured or made worse. In view of the wonder- 
ful record, a number of States have passed laws recognizing 
it as a safe and efficacious method of treatment; and it is 
not only receiving the attention and endorsement of the most 
intelligent classes where it is being introduced, but is com- 
manding the consideration of the progressive minds of the 
medical world. 

Owing to the literal translation of the word "Oste- 
opathy," its appropriateness to the science, as taught and 
practiced, has to some extent been criticised. It may be 
necessary, therefore, to explain that, while it seems to have 
been the original idea of the founder of the science that 
nearly all diseases are caused by dislocated bones, the expe- 
rience of his students does not prove this theory to be correct, 
but find that the adaptation of the name lies not so much in 
the treatment of bones as in the use made of them in applying 
the treatment; so that it may be said that the name "Oste- 
opathy" is significant of the science, not only to the extent 
that bones constitute the framework or basis on which the 
superstructure of the human body is constructed, and which 
must be perfectly adjusted and functionally normal to make 
possible a complete physiological condition, but the skeleton 
furnishes indispensable starting-points to the osteopath 
when examining the body in search of abnormalities, as well 
as the exact location of important nerve-centers, arteries, 
and veins, so essential to intelligent treatment. Further 
than this, the bones of the extremities are often used as 
levers, fulcrums, etc., where the treatment requires the 



INTRODUCTION. 11 

Stretching of contracted muscles, freeing the circulation of 
the nutritive fluids and nerve-currents of the body. 

Osteopathy is veritably a common-sense method of treat- 
ing diseased conditions of the body, either structural or 
functional — without knife or drugs, — by means of strictly 
scientific manipulations. It makes no demands upon the 
vitality of the patient, but enlists the curative powers con- 
tained within the body, which readily respond when properly 
appealed' to. Its method is purely mechanical, and its 
cardinal principles might be classified as follows: Skeleton 
Adjustment, Glandular Activity, Free Circulation of Blood, 
and Coordination of Nerve-Force. 

The art of applying its methods is dependent upon a 
thorough knowledge of anatomy and physiology, and a 
proper application of the principles involved therein, as well 
as a knowledge of the organic powers of the body, and the 
nerve-centers through which they may be excited to action 
and regulated. 

The osteopath, being^a student of forces," deals with the 
body as a wonderfully constructed machine, composed of 
various tissues and organs, each performing some specific 
function in the promotion of vital economy, under the super- 
vision of vital forces; and when perfectly adjusted, will con- 
tinue to operate its full appointed time, unless interfered 
with by accident or abuse. 

All lesions causing pathological conditions are not only 
the excess, defect, or perversion of some structure or func- 
tion, but it is a physiological conclusion that they will be 
found accompanied by incoordination of the vital forces of 
the body; that is, an excessive or excited condition of some 
vital energy, as compared with some other in a corresponding 
degree of deficiency or inactivity. The vital forces being 



12 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

thus deranged, harmony is destroyed and the system 
becomes diseased. 

To detect a pathological condition, the osteopath must 
know well a perfect anatomical and physiological being; 
just as a detector of counterfeits must be perfectly familiar 
with every point of the genuine before he can be skilled in 
his profession; and although the osteopathic application of 
the principles of anatomy and physiology differs materially 
from that made by any other science of therapeutics, it is 
perfectly rational and purely scientific. The proper deduc- 
ing of the cause from the effect being an elementary prin- 
ciple of intelligent treatment, the osteopath applies his meth- 
ods to the removal of the cause, be it the reduction of a dislo- 
cation, the arousing of an enervated organ, equalization of 
the circulation of the body fluids, or the coordination of the 
nerve-force; harmony — which is the beauty and strength, 
not only of all institutions, but of all mechanism as well — 
being thus restored, health is the result: whereby is pro- 
moted by osteopathic methods the production and mainte- 
nance of healthy tissue and function in the system. 

SKELETON ADJUSTMENT. 

It is obvious to the student of physiology, of even ordi- 
nary intelligence, that there can be no complete condition of 
health without a perfectly adjusted skeleton. Its relative 
importance to the weal of the body is that of the foundation 
to the house. That luxations are much more common than 
supposed, and can be produced by an accident so slight as to 
go unobserved, is painfully demonstrated by the thousands 
of cases that have been overlooked by some of the most 
eminent practitioners; when, had they been searched for 



INTRODUCTION. 13 

from an osteopathic standpoint, they could no doubt have 
been easily reduced, thus removing the cause of many morbid 
affections that often prove so perplexing to the practitioners 
of the usual methods. 

A dislocation is not necessarily the result of external 
violence. It may be caused by the ulceration of a process of 
bone, elongation of ligaments, or by muscular action; so that 
its discovery must not depend too much upon the history of 
some violent accident, but should be arrived at by a minute 
examination and comparison with a normal joint, the success 
of which largely depends upon the practitioner's familiarity 
with a perfect anatomical condition. There will usually be 
found in case of a dislocated member, alteration in the form 
of the joint and axis of the limb, impaired circulation in the 
parts involved, loss of proper motion, pain on manipulation, 
lengthening or shortening, prominence at one point and 
depression at another, but in some cases precise measure- 
ments to and from certain fixed points about the joint as 
compared with a normal joint are necessary in order to dis- 
cover the true condition. 

The first examination of a patient by an osteopath is, or 
should be, with special reference to the normality of the 
skeleton, for though a luxation may be but partial, it may be 
causing a pressure at some point upon a nerve or blood-vessel 
of which the patient is entirely unconscious, and thus remain 
unaccounted for as a barrier to the recovery of health. 

To undertake to heal a diseased body with a dislocated 
member without first reducing the dislocation is like trying 
to operate a machine with an important cog-wheel out of 
gear. 



14 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

GLANDULAR ACTIVITY. 

The Dormal action of the secreting glands is absolutely 
essential to health, and particular attention to the proper 
performance of this function is not only demanded of the 
osteopath, but remedies influencing the secretions are given 
a first place in the practice of materia medica. 

Secretions are divided into two classes, known as ^'re- 
crementitious" and "excrementitious." The process is car- 
ried on by cells, which in most cases are grouped in organs 
known as glands. These cells are defined as ''nucleated 
masses of protoplasm of microscopic size." Protoplasm is 
germinal matter of a gelatinous nature — a proteid compound 
consisting largely of muco-globulin. Chemically it contains 
C. H. N. O, S., and its reaction is albuminous. The nucleus 
is a small vesicular body imbedded in the protoplasm. 
Chemically it is a nitrogenous constituent, and its purpose is 
largely that of cell-reproduction. Biologically, cells are the 
fundamental elements of living tissue, and in view of the 
demands made upon them by the process of destructive 
metabolism, whereby the protoplasm of cells is being con- 
stantly destroyed by active use, Nature has wisely provided 
them with the power of reproduction of kind that they may 
remain constant. They have the power of motion in 
response to stimuli, and the power of absorbing certain por- 
tions of food and rejecting the rest. 

The function of the principal secreting glands of the 
body is not a mere physical process of filtration, as might be 
inferred from some authorities, but is in fact a vital process; 
for these glands not only separate from the blood certain 
materials for reabsorption, but by their elaborating proc- 
esses convert these materials into higher degrees of tissue 



INTRODUCTIOX. 15 

products ; dependent upon a course of chemical operation of 
their own by which they manufacture new substances not 
found in the blood, the whole forming a secretion known as 
recrementitious matter for use in the promotion of animal 
economy. They separate certain other materials from the 
blood to be discharged from the body as excrementitious 
matter, being either useless or harmful if retained. 

It is therefore apparent that with glandular activity the 
body possesses laboratories of its own capable of manufact- 
uring within itself all the remedial properties conducive to 
its well-being; so that it is not only unnecessary to introduce 
unorganized chemicals into the system, but to do so and 
expect them to become organized by inactive glands is unrea- 
sonable in the extreme. All materials must be especially 
organized by the glands of the body before they can promote 
the function of tissue-nutrition, and to introduce unor- 
ganized matter into the system and expect it to be appropri- 
ated without becoming organized, one had as well undertake 
to add inches to pounds. Furthermore, the majority of 
chemicals in crude state are injurious to the system, and 
Nature has unerringly provided that one of the special func- 
tions of the liver shall be to filter from the blood containing 
fresh absorptions from the digestive tract all materials that 
would be poisonous to the body if permitted to enter the gen- 
eral circulation, and reject them back to the intestines to be 
discharged. Might it not then be an interesting problem — 
the solving of which would cause confusion — as to how much 
of the chemical introduced reached its destination and 
accomplished its purpose, without causing a corresponding 
injury to the system. 

It is a well-established physiological principle that 
glandular activity is affected by the amount of blood passing 



16 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

tliroiigli the gland, and that the function of secretion is 
dependent upon proper innervation and free circulation of 
blood. It is through these agencies that the osteopath cor- 
rects glandular irregularities and promotes the function of 
secretion. 

The cause of lesions of secretions may be local or general, 
and the local or general secretion is affected accordingly. A 
sharp pain is evidence of excitation ; a dull pain, with sensa- 
tions of weight and fullness, of glandular inactivity. If these 
symptoms are not local, the condition is likely general ; and 
if the condition is one of inactivity, the skilled osteopath 
applies his 'method of increasing the general blood-pressure, 
by increasing the force and frequency of the heart's action ; 
regulating the caliber of the arteries, through the vaso-motor 
centers; and coordinating the general nerve force. If the 
condition is local, his method would be to increase the local 
blood-pressure, by relaxation of the arteries supplying the 
gland affected, without compensating relaxation elsewhere; 
or by constriction of the arteries other than those supplying 
the gland. If the condition should be one of excitation or 
excess, methods opposite those used for inactivity would be 
applied. 

FREE CIRCULATION OF BLOOD. 

It is conceded by all leading authorities that a normal 
circulation of blood is one of the most important functions of 
life, and it can hardly be more forcibly demonstrated than by 
the fact that in a normal condition a quantity of blood equal 
to the entire amount in an ordinary human being passes 
through the heart about every thirty seconds. The blood 
represents about one-twelfth of the body weight, and nor- 
mally is distributed about one-fourth in the liver; one-fourth 



INTRODUCTION'. 17 

in the muscles; one-fourth in the heart, lungs, and large 
vessels; and one-fourth in other organs. It is composed of 
serum — a nearly colorless liquid — and red and white corpus- 
cles. Chemically it contains proteids, fats, sugar, salts, and 
hemoglobin. The corpuscles represent about forty to forty- 
five per cent of its total weight, and there are about 14,500 
white corpuscles to 5,000.000 of the red in each cubic milli- 
meter; the proportion varying in different conditions of 
health and disease. The red corpuscles have a definite life, 
and degenerate as do other parts of the body. The white 
corpuscles have the power of ameboid movement, by which 
they are able to pass through the walls of capillaries into the 
surrounding tissues. They have their source of origin in the 
lymph glands and the spleen; and some of them end in red 
corpuscles, while others take part in inflammatory processes 
being sacrificed in pus-formation. 

The blood is propelled by the heart through the arteries 
to the capillaries in the substance of the tissues, where it is 
collected by the veins and returned to the heart ; thus serv- 
ing as a transporting medium, carrying food and oxygen to 
the tissues of the body for their nourishment, and bringing 
back morbid elements for excretion. Not only is glandular 
activity dependent upon a free flow of blood, but the minute 
and equal distribution of this nutritive fluid is indeed essen- 
tial to the proper appropriation of tissue-building elements, 
as well as the no less important process of retrograde meta- 
morphosis, whereby are removed waste and worn-out mate- 
rials, which, if retained in the system, would inevitably pro- 
duce disease. Further than this, the union, in the body, of 
oxygen received by the blood from the lungs, with carbon 
and hydrogen, produces a process of combustion by which the 
normal heat of the bodv is maintained, so that with an 



18 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

obstructed circulation the part of the body inyolved would of 
necessity suffer from a lack of proper warmth. Being the 
basis, therefore, for the vital performance of assimilation 
and elimination, as well as the maintenance of the body 
temperature, health must be dependent upon a regular and 
uniform circulation of blood, and disease will surely follow 
any continued variation of this function. 

The osteopath refers more causes of pathological condi- 
tions to impairment of this function than to any other of the 
body, and through its agency effects more cures. 

The constriction of an important artery or vein, caused by 
a slightly'displaced bone or organ, or an indurated muscle, 
will produce an excess of blood in one part of the body, and a 
corresponding deficiency in another, probably resulting in 
headache, and a corresponding coldness of the lower extremi- 
ties; depending, of course, upon the location of the obstruc- 
tion, which, if not removed, will almost certainly cause irreg- 
ular action of the heart. To illustrate: A hose with two 
branches being attached to a force pump, and one branch 
being constricted by pressure of the hand or foot, more water 
is of necessity forced through the other branch, and a greater 
effort is required of the pump in propelling the given amount 
of water, resulting in an early impairment of the pump if the 
obstruction is not removed, 

A free flow of blood is the remedial agency in the 
osteopathic treatment of inflammatory processes ; their ter- 
mination by resolution being promoted by relaxation of 
the structures involved, thus freeing the blood-passages 
through and from the affected area, whereby the capillaries 
are flushed with a fresh supply of blood and morphological 
elements rapidly removed as the circulation is being 
restored. 



lyTEODUCTION. 19 

Xot ouIt is this method efficacious in simple processes, 
but especially so in those known as infective, where micro- 
organism is a peculiar characteristic, such as diphtheria or 
typhoid fever. Osteopathy has for its purpose, in the treat- 
ment of all such diseases, simply the restoration of healthy 
tissue, claiming that no microbe can inhabit tissues physio- 
logically normal, and that only such as have imperfect elimi- 
nation of waste materials are susceptible of their invasion, 
and suitable for their development. They are found, there- 
fore, as the result rather than the cause of pathological con- 
ditions. This theory is strongly demonstrated by the fact 
that two individuals may be exposed to an infectious disease 
at the same time, and oi e may contract it while the oth^r does 
not, which is owing to the difference in the physiological con- 
dition of the two systems. In one case there was free circula- 
tion of blood rich with leucocytes, or white blood-corpuscles; 
the eliminating processes were active, thus giving the sys- 
tem the power of resistance; or, in other words, it was 
physiologically normal. In the other case, the circulation of 
blood was sluggish, and perhaps deficient in white blood- 
corpuscles; there was no doubt glandular inactivity and 
impaired elimination, thus giving the system no power of 
resistance; or, in other words, it was already in a patholog- 
ical condition. 

Leading physiologists teach that one of the most import- 
ant offices of the white hlood-corpuscles is to attack, devour, and 
destroy invading micro-organism. They are, therefore, be- 
yond any question, a powerful microbicide, and a remedial 
agency in these processes especially provided by Xature, and 
consequently uninjurious to the system. It is within the 
province of the skillful osteopath not only to increase their 
number through their sources of origin, but to aid the great 



20 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

transporting medium in conveying them to the scene of 
conflict. 

Osteopathy stands without a formidable competitor in 
the art of equalizing the circulation of blood, and though its 
method of freeing the blood-passages and regulating the 
action of the heart are so evidently in accord with the prin- 
ciples of anatomy and physiology, yet they are not even 
remotely approximated by the methods of any other science 
of therapeutics. 

COORDINATION OF NERVE-FORCE. 

It is n'ot only agreed that pathological conditions may be 
of neurotic origin, but that the phenomena of all lesions of 
the body are to some extent portrayed through the nervous 
system. The control of the nervous system over the func- 
tions concerned in the motion, sensation, and nutrition of the 
entire body places it among the leading agencies through 
which the osteopathic methods of healing are applied. 

To exercise a controlling influence over this system has 
bafSed the skill of the most eminent practitioners of the old 
schools. Their methods having been confined almost exclu- 
sively to experiments with electricity and chemicals. 

The osteopath regards the nervous mechanism of the 
body as an immense electrical sj^stem, containing its own 
batteries, wires, and other necessary appliances. It is 
capable of generating all the force needed, and simply 
requires perfect continuity and coordination by mechanical 
methods. 

The brain receives sensory impressions, and transmits 
motor impulses. The. spinal cord conducts them to and from 
the various wires which carry the impulses to the most 
remote tissues of the entire being. 



INTRODUCTION. 21 

The white or fibrous nerve-matter is composed ot a num- 
ber of tubes, each containing an axis-cylinder, insulated and 
protected by the White Substance of Schwann. A bundle of 
these tubes is invested by a covering, the neurilemma, and is 
called a "nerve'' — the arrangement having been likened to a 
submarine telegraph cable. The axis-cylinder connects the 
nerve-center with the cells of the periphery. The fibers con- . 
tained in the nerve are classified as affereiit and efferent fibers, 
and their function is the transmission of stimuli. The former 
carry impulses from the periphery to the center, and are 
known as sensory fibers. The latter carry them from the 
center to the periphery, and are known as motor fibers. The 
system has two divisions, the Cerebrospinal, and the Sympa- 
thetic. The cerebro-spinal includes the brain, medulla 
oblongata, and spinal cord, also the nerves proceeding from 
them. The sympathetic consists of a double chain of 
ganglia — small nerve-centers — which lie on either side of the 
vertebral column, extending its entire length, and are closely 
connected with the spinal nerves, each of which gives off a 
communicating branch, containing both motor and sensory 
fibers, to a neighboring sympathetic ganglion. Indeed, the 
two systems are so closely allied that practically they may 
be considered as one, for by following closely the anatomy 
and physiology of the sympathetic system it will be found 
that the fibers of most of its nerves have their origin in the 
spinal cord. For instance, the splanchnic nerves, which 
form a great part of the solar plexus supplying the abdomi- 
nal viscera, have their fibrous origin in the spinal cord, as 
do the accelerator nerves of the heart in the cervical and 
upper dorsal region of the cord, stimulation of which center 
physiology teaches will increase the heart's action. There 
are certain fibers, known as the vaso-motor fibers, whose 



22 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

function has to do with the regulation of the caliber of the 
blood-vessels, especially the arteries. They are divided into 
constrictor and dilator fibers, and, though controlled by the 
sympathetic system, come from the spinal cord, their most 
important spinal center being in the cervical region; while 
the nutritive function of the entire body is under the immedi- 
ate supervision of the sympathetic system, that it is depend- 
ent upon the connection of that system with the spinal cord 
is a physiological fact which needs no particular comment 

There are thirty-one pairs of spinal nerves; each arises 
by two roots, an anterior motor root and a posterior sensory 
one; these unite, and the nerve then divides into two 
branches, an anterior and a posterior, both having motor and 
sensory fibers. The anterior nerves supply the body in front 
of the spinal column, also the limbs, and send communicat- 
ing branches to the sympathetic ganglia. The posterior 
nerves supply the muscles and integument of the back, and 
contain both afferent and efferent fibers. 

The function of the spinal cord is the "conduction of 
impulses," and the ''origination of reflex action in response to 
stimuli," whereby an impulse may be transmitted through 
afferent fibers to a center in the spinal cord, and there trans- 
formed into an efferent impulse and conducted to the part of 
the body receiving its innervation from the nerve center thus 
operated upon. The spinal cord contains many of the most 
important centers of the nervous system, and which are 
capable of being excited reflexly; such as the spinal vaso- 
motor centers, cardio-accelerator center, parturition center, 
etc.; the action of the cells of the cord being independent of 
the will, and occurs before the mind is conscious of it. It is 
therefore within the power of the skillful osteopath to pro- 



INTFODUCTION. 23 

duce effects in almost any part of the body through the 
wonderful mechanism of this spinal key -board. 

Although it is a well-established principle of neuro- 
physiology that the action of nerves can be influenced by /lAvCiA. 
mechanical stimuli, it has remained for the osteopath to dem- .J/Jcm. 
oustrate that it is entirely practical, and that it is more j ,' o 
effectual to apply the stimulus to the nerve supplying the ■ .' , , ' 
tissue or organ than to apply it directly to the structure 
involved. He has furthermore proven the physiological 
teaching t hat a sudden pressure oyer a nerve followed by 
immediate retraction will stimulate or excite the nerve to! 
action; and on the other hand, a gentle ^ steady pressure 
quiets or deadeiis the action, producing for a time the effect j 
of nerve-section, paralysis, or osteopathic desensitization. It is 
not only obvious that there must be perfect continuity of 
nerve-force in order that any organ may receive a message to 
discharge a certain function, but proper innervation is an 
indispensable factor in the vitality of every tissue and organ. 
Coordination of the nerve-force of the body is no less essen- 
tial, for with the nervous energy of one part of the body in a 
state of excitation as compared with the rest, there is excess 
of some function which makes unnecessary demands upon 
the vitality of the body at the expense of its delicate 
machinery, producing a result probably similar in a measure 
to that of an electrical apparatus charged beyond its 
capacity. 

With a thorough knowledge of the various nerve-centers, 
and the innervation of the different tissues and organs, the 
osteopath is able to coordinate the nerve-force of the body. 
He can increase the nerve-current to almost any part of the 
being, and can quiet an excessive one as well. The eflflcacy 
and practicability of this theory has been satisfactorily 



24 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

demonstrated in the treatment of ataxia, paralysis, anes- 
thetic and hyperesthetic conditions, as well as in the regula- 
tion of the peristaltic action of the bowels, the regulation of 
the heart's action, controlling the caliber of the blood- 
vessels, and the relief and assistance so effectually rendered 
in parturition. 



Preliminary Miscellanea. 



RESEARCHES OF DR. ELMER D. BARBER. 

The author was born in Oneida, N. Y., May 17, 1858, and 
when a mere boy arrived at the conclusion that the age of 
miracles was past, and that all results could be traced to a 
reasonable cause. 

While in Jersey City, N. J., we met a gentleman who, 
without the use of drugs or surgical instruments,by manip- 
ulations which he could not explain, was curing hundreds 
of people in a public hall. 

Then came Paul Castor, whose cures were equally mar- 
velous and likewise inexplicable. We visited faith doc- 
tors and spiritualistic mediums and witnessed their results, 
but found the principle on which they worked shrouded in 
mystery. 

We next heard of Dr. Andrew T. Still, who was effecting 
cure after cure in a marvelous manner, upon (as he claimed) 
scientific principles. We visited the old doctor, were con- 
vinced that he had discovered the fundamental principles 
on which were based the results accidentally reached by 
others, and entered his School of Osteopathy, from which 
we graduated March 2, 1895, with an average grade of 99 in 
Anatomy and Physiology and 100 in Osteopathy. 

Immediately after graduation we removed to Baxter 
Springs, Kas., and engaged in the active practice of Osteop- 
athy. It was at this period, when fresh from the school at 
Kirksville, Mo., with our pockets bursting with notes gath- 

—3— 



PEELIMIXART MISCELLAyEA. 27 

ered eagerly from tlie lips of the discoTerer of Osteopathy, 
that our small book, "Osteopathy, the New Science of Drug- 
less Healing."' was written. Since the publication of that 
volume, haring studied very carefully all works that we 
could procure having any bearing upon this subject, besides 
treating and curing hundreds of patients osteopathically, we 
are led to believe that there is not so much that is new, 
except the name, but that Osteopathy is a combination of 
many movement-cures scientifically applied. 

From a careful study of Gray and Landois, we find that 
Dr. Still has discovered no new nerve-centers; he has simply 
discovered a. fact that has been overlooked by the ordinary 
physician : that a steady pressure over a given nerve-center 
will produce a certain result; while stimulating by manipu- 
lation over the same center produces an opposite result; and 
that by working upon these centers we can control the 
organic system. 

He has, therefore, simply discovered a correct and scien- 
tific method of manipulation, whereby the osteopath can 
equalize the circulation, and, in fact, all the forces of the 
body — in very many cases, after all other methods have been 
tried and failed. 

"\Miile it is our desire to give Dr. Still credit for any 
points which he has discovered, we must differ with him as to 
the true cause of the results reached by the Osteopath. 
TMiile the good Doctor believes that nearly all diseases are 
caused by dislocated bones, nearly always finding them and 
thereby winning for himself the name of "Bone Doctor," in 
our practice we never find a great number of dislocations and 
by the same manipulation effect the same cures as Dr. Still. 
If a bone is really dislocated and has been in that condition 
for years, the dislocation can not be reduced; but if the 



28 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

muscles are contracted, causing a stiff joint or depressing the 
ribs, they can be quickly relieved by manipulation, and the 
patient is easily led to believe that the bone was dislocated. 
While we do not doubt for an instant that our classmates 
are sincere in their belief that in catarrh, sore eyes, deafness, 
and other disease of the head, the atlas is dislocated, and 
that they cure these diseases by setting the atlas, we believe 
that twisting, pulling, and stretching the neck in a vain 
attempt to move the atlas stretches the muscles, thereby 
freeing the circulation and permitting Nature to assert her- 
self. Be they right or wrong, our readers can cure almost 
any acute disease in the head, almost instantly, by gently 
pulling on the head and rotating it in all directions; and 
many chronic complaints by a continuation of the same 
method. We all agree upon the one great point, that man is 
a machine, and that nerve-centers have b^en discovered 
upon which a pressure of the hand will cause the heart to 
slow or quicken its action, from which we can regulate the 
action of the stomach, bowels, liver, pancreas, kidneys, and 
the diaphragm. The thousands of people snatched from the 
grave by an application of these never-failing principles are 
proof positive that at last the keynote has been struck; and 
a school established that can explain intelligently why cer- 
tain manipulations produce certain results. 

Viewing the brain, the cerebrospinal cord, and the nerves 
as an immense telegraph system (the brain acting not only 
as a great dynamo, generating the forces which control and 
move the body, but as headquarters, receiving and sending 
messages to all parts of the body; the slender nerves passing 
through, under, over, and between the hundreds of bonea 
muscles, arteries, veins, ligaments, and various organs), caa 
you wonder that the wires are sometimes down,that the com- 
munication is occasionally cut off between headquarters and 



PRELIMINARY MISCELLANEA. 29 

some important o£Bce, or that paralysis is the result? Do 
you wonder that occasionally the wires are crossed, and that 
the message (possibly to the bowels, to discharge their load) 
is received by the- kidneys, which promptly obey the order? 
The bowels having failed to respond to orders from head- 
quarters, a second message goes over the wires, and again 
the kidneys answer the summons; the result is kidney disease 
and constipation. While we cannot go directly to the nerves 
at fault, we can, by manipulations, which will be fully 
described under their proper head, stretch the contracted 
muscle that is obstructing the current; whereupon, if the 
case has not become chronic, the bowels will immediately 
resume their functions and the excited kidneys will cease to 
act so rapidly. In chronic cases it usually takes Nature from 
two to six weeks to assert herself. In the nervous system, as 
in the telegraphic, the current must not be obstructed. 

The massage treatment effects many remarkable cures 
by moving the flesh and muscles in all possible directions 
over the entire body. They unwittingly and unavoidably, if 
they are very thorough, free the right spot, establishing the 
circuit, thus permitting Nature to assert herself. 

Another very important part in this complicated machine 
is the systemic, pulmonary, and portal circulation : the arte- 
ries are cylindrical vessels, conveying the blood through 
this network of nerves and muscles to all parts of the body; 
the veins gathering up and returning it to the never-tiring 
heart, pumping steadily throughout a lifetime, driving the 
blood to the most remote parts of the system and forcing it 
to return. Is it to be wondered at that occasionally a muscle 
contracts, after a hard day's work or exposure to the cold, 
possibly obstructing some little river of blood on its journey 
to nourish a given part? Do you wonder that the part ill 
question weakens from lack of nourishment and fails to 



80 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

perform its allotted task? As it is the blood that must con- 
vey all substances of nourishment to the different parts, is 
it a wonder that the medicine never arrives at its destination? 
Should a large artery be obstructed in a similar manner, 
would it be surprising if the heart, working against heavy 
odds, trying to pump the blood past the obstruction, in time 
felt the pressure? in which case heart disease would be the 
result. Should the contraction be in the thigh, obstructing 
the femoral artery, we have cold feet and limbs on one side 
of the obstruction, and heart disease on the other. If the 
veins returning the blood are obstructed in the same region, 
we may have either dropsy, inflammatory rheumatism, ery- 
sipelas, eczema, or varicose veins, caused by the stagnant, 
pent-up blood, on one side, and heart disease on the other. 
Having briefly referred to the bones that support, the 
nerves that control, and the blood that supplies, let us dwell 
for a moment on the muscles that move and propel this won- 
derful living machine. As the only power muscles have is 
in contraction, they must be arranged in such a position and 
so attached to the bone as to pull from any direction in which 
it may be necessary to move a given part. Receiving as they 
do not only their orders to act, but their motor power, from 
that great dynamo the brain, they may be justly compared 
to so many electric cars. One car may be larger and stronger 
than another, but, deprived of the current from that slender 
wire, which of itself is nothing, neither can move from its 
position. Is this not indeed a delicate and complicated 
piece of machinery, the nerves and fluids of the body moving 
unobstructed through the hundreds of rapidly contracting 
and relaxing muscles? We state most emphatically that the 
true cause of many diseases may be traced to some muscle 
which has contracted and for some unaccountable reason 
has failed to relax, thus interfering with all the forces of life. 



PRELIMINART MISCELLAXEA. 31 

It is by working on these principles, which we have briefly 
sketched, that we achieve results bordering on the miracu- 
lous; it is by working on these principles that we draw 
patients and students from the length and breadth of our 
land; it is by working on these same principles, fully ex- 
plained and illustrated in the following pages, that any 
family can attain some very remarkable results. 

OSTEOPATHY IN A NUTSHELL. 

First: Using the arms and limbs as levers, stretching 
all muscles to which they give attachment and moving the 
flesh and muscles from side to side the entire length of the 
limb stretches and softens those muscles, thus permitting a 
free flow of the fluids and nerve forces to these parts, a 
stoppage of which means disease in some of its varied forms. 
One thorough treatment of an arm or leg will often instantly 
cure, and almost always relieve an acute case of any nature 
in the extremities, and a very few treatments, administered 
one each day, will cure any acute case. Chronic cases can be 
usually cured by a continuation of the treatment, every other 
day, for from two to six weeks, even after all other methods 
have been tried and failed. 

Second: Move and soften, by deep manipulations and 
by rotating the spinal column as much as possible, all the 
muscles of the spine. The spinal cord is the great trunk from 
which springs the spinal nerves, and is contained in, and 
protected by the upper three-fourths of the spinal column, 
which is very flexible, consisting of many separate bones, 
between which is placed the elastic intravertebral cartilage. 
As the spinal nerves which control the different muscles, 
organs, etc., escape from the spinal cord through openings 
or foramina in the different sections of the vertebral column, 



32 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

it will be readily understood that the numerous muscles 
which are attached to and move the spine must always be 
very soft and elastic; that contraction here means inter- 
ference with nerves that may control some distant part, and 
a consequent partial or complete paralysis of that part, until 
by manipulation or accidentally the muscle at fault is 
relaxed, thus turning on the current from that great dynamo 
the brain, and once more the machine moves forward. 

Third: Using the head as a lever, move and stretch all 
the muscles of the neck. This treatment frees the circula- 
tion to the head, an obstruction of which is the true cause 
of catarrh, weak eyes, deafness, roaring in the head, dizziness, 
and, in fact, almost all disorders of the head. Many acute 
cases can be instantly cured, while those that have become 
chronic require a much longer course of treatment. 

Fourth: Bending the patient backward, with the knee 
pressing on the back just below the last rib, will usually 
cure any case of looseness of the bowels, from common 
diarrhea to bloody flux, and a continuation of the treatment 
will cure any case of chronic diarrhea. 

Fifth: A nerve-center has been discovered at the base 
of the brain, termed vaso-motor, which can be reached by a 
pressure on the back of the neck over the upper cervicals. A 
pressure at this point continued from three to five minutes 
will slow the action of the heart, often reducing the pulse 
from 100 to a normal condition in a few minutes' time. It is 
from this center that, without the use of drugs, we control 
fevers, curing any fever that is curable in one-half the time 
that the same work can be done with medicine. 

Sixth: In all cases where the general system seems to 
be affected, give a general treatment, thus freeing and per- 
mitting all the forces of the machine to act. 

Seventh: Never treat an acute case oftener than once 
in three hours, or a chronic case oftener than once a dav. 



PEELIiliyARY MISCELLAXEA. 33 

Eighth: It is never safe to use this treatment during 
pregnancy, except in diseases of the head or extremities, and 
in those with caution. To draw the arms high and strongly 
• above the head, at the same instant pressing on the spine 
below the last dorsal vertebra, or to flex the limbs strongly 
against the chest, during this period, is dangerous in the 
extreme. 

yinth: While this treatment will improve the action 
and remove the pain in stiff, chronic dislocated joints, the 
dislocation can never be reduced. We have seen it tried, 
and tried it ourselves a great many times, meeting with no 
success where there was really a dislocation of long standing. 
There are a great many cases where the patient is suffering 
from rheumatism or a similar trouble in which the muscles 
are contracted, and he can easily be led to believe that a dis- 
location does really exist, and that the operator who simply 
stretches the muscles has reduced the imaginary dislocation. 
This we believe also to be the case regarding the many dislo- 
cated ribs found by the average "bone doctor." While they 
may be correct, we have demonstrated the fact, times with- 
out number, that drawing the arms high above the head, at 
the same instant pressing at almost any point with the knee 
immediately below the scapulae, thus stretching the muscles 
of the chest and springing the ribs forward, will instantly 
cure sharp acute pains in the sides or chest and certain cases 
of heart disease, while a continuation of the same treatment 
will cure asthma or consumption in its early stages. It is on 
this vital point that we differed in class as well as in practice 
with the other members of our profession. While they trace 
most effects to dislocated bones, and never fail to effect a 
cure if it is within the bounds of reason, we effect equally 
remarkable cures in many instances by simply stretching 



34 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

and manipulating the muscles, thus freeing the circulation. 
While we do not believe it possible that to hide his secrets 
a ''bone doctor" would deceive the public, we believe that in 
a vain attempt to set the bones in the manner prescribed by 
Dr. Still the circulation is freed and the patient recovers. 

Tenth: We have recently discovered that shaking or 
vibration administered by the hand quickens, stimulates, and 
strengthens. In reducing inflammation and congestion it 
diminishes pain, and if applied over certain nerve-centers, it 
increases the secretion of the glands. 

'HOW TO APPLY OSTEOPATHY. 

First: While it is very necessary to have a leather up- 
holstered table, 2 feet 2 inches high, 2 feet wide, and 6 feet 
long, for office work, a cheap pine table of the same dimen- 
sions, over which is spread a bed-quilt, with one or two 
pillows, will answer the same purpose at the home of chronic 
invalids who cannot reach the office. It is always advisable, 
if possible, to have a table, not only being very much easier 
and more convenient for the operator, but being a firm sup- 
port, the patient can be placed and retained in the most 
desirable position for successful treatment. In acute cases, 
however, we are often obliged to treat the patient upon the 
bed, a couch, chair, and sometimes upon the floor, usually 
getting very good results. 

Second: In treating a patient osteopathically, while 
the treatment can be applied through a reasonable amount 
of clothing, enough should be removed to enable the opera- 
tor to administer the treatment in a thorough and intelligent 
manner. 

Third: It is always advisable for a lady to remove her 



PRELIMINARY MISCELLANEA. 35 

clotliing, putting on a loose robe, which every osteopath 
should have in his office for this purpose. 

Fourth: It is entirely unnecessary, except in rare in- 
stances, to expose any portion of the patient's person, except 
the spine in making first examination. 

Fifth: All manipulations should be given in a slow, 
gentle, thorough, careful manner, thus giving the muscles 
of the patient an opportunity to relax. The patient should 
always be cautioned or instructed to permit the muscles to 
relax as much as possible. The object of the manipulation 
being to stretch the muscles in any manner that will best 
tend to free the circulation and remove the pressure that 
may be obstructing the free and uninterrupted flow of the 
nerve- wave to any given point. 

Sixth: A thorough general treatment tends to stimu- 
late and equalize all forces of the entire system. 

Sev&nth: A pressure upon a nerve-center, to control 
a certain organ, should not be continued over two to four 
minutes, and should not be administered oftener than once 
in four hours. 

Eighth: Acute cases should be treated each day, the 
treatment occupying, according to the case, from ten to 
thirty minutes. Great care must be exercised in discrim- 
inating between patients who can stand a light or a strong 
treatment. In no case should the treatment be so strong 
or long continued as to exhaust the patient; on the contrary, 
the patient should feel relieved and refreshed after each 
treatment. 

NiMth: In chronic cases the first treatment should be 
very light, each treatment growing stronger until the opera- 
tor has determined just how strong a treatment will pro- 
duce the best results. Most chronic cases should be treated 



36 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

every other day, from ten to thirty minutes, according to the 
disease and number of different manipulations employed. 
In most chronic cases we should see some change for the 
better in a very few days. 

Tenth: Vibration. — We have recently discovered that 
vibration administered by the hand quickens, stimulates, 
strengthens, and assists very materially in reducing con- 
gestion and inflammation, and is very beneficial in many 
cases, in addition to the regular osteopathic treatment; in 
fact, we have cured cases of stammering, asthma, and vari- 
ous other troubles in which we failed to get results by the 
regular osteopathic manipulations. Vibration should be 
applied with a loose wrist- joint, the whole or a part of the 
palmar surface of the hand or fingers being used. The move- 
ments in the wrist-joint are abduction and adduction, while 
the movements of the elbow are fiexion and extension; the 
hand lies immovable upon the part of the body on which it 
rests. Through a quick succession of individual movements, 
with a perfectly loose wrist-joint the vibrations are produced. 
Flexion and extension of the wrist must be carefully guarded 
against, as this would produce pressure, which would be 
injurious in many localities. In fact, vibration correctly 
applied is such a wonderful instrument in relieving pain 
that we cannot impress this one point too forcibly upon the 
minds of our readers : Always vibrate with a loose wrist-joint, 
using no greater pressure than the weight of the hand, as the 
entire benefit to be derived from the treatment is lost if this 
point is neglected. 

Eleventh: In applying osteopathic treatment in the 
manipulation of muscles, the operator should avoid using 
the end of the fingers as much as possible, as much stronger 



\ 



PRELIMINARY MISCELLANEA. 37 

and better treatment can be given by using the palmar sur- 
face of the fingers or hand. 

Ticelfth : After three years of active practice, we desire 
to correct a number of erroneous statements which appear 
in our former book written immediately after graduation, 
and from notes taken at the A. T. Still Infirmary. While 
all treatments given in that work are substantially correct 
as laid down by the discoverer of Osteopathy, we find that 
where, in acute cases, we used the word ''^instantli/,^' it 
should have been in most cases "a few hours,'' and that in 
chronic cases, while we usually get immediate results, about 
double the time specified is generally required to effect the 
cure. 

HOW TO MAKE THE EXAMINATION. 

So much depends, from an osteopathic standpoint, upon 
the human framework being correctly adjusted, that in all 
cases where the nature of the disease does not render the 
cause apparent, the spine is first examined. 

First: Place the patient upon the face, a pillow under 
the breast and chin, the nose and mouth just far enough 
above the pillow to enable the patient to breath as he lies 
face downward, with the head and neck perfectly straight; 
let the arms hang down over the sides of the table. In this 
position the spine should be perfectly straight laterally, and 
any deviation from the correct line is easily detected, and 
must be corrected before we can hope to remove the cause of 
the disease, and thereby effect a cure. In this position, an 
anterior or posterior curvature is also easily discovered. 

Second: With the patient lying in this position, ex- 
amine the ribs. If in a normal position, they will present 
a flat surface to the hand passed over them, and should be 



38 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

about an equal distance apart. If an edge is discovered, 
the rib is slightly turned; the space is unequal between it 
and the adjoining rib, and its inner edge is pressing upon 
some portion of the anatomy which it is supposed to protect; 
being turned slightly in its articulation, it can hardly fail 
to press upon some nerve or artery, which may control or 
nourish a distant part. In other instances we discover the 
floating ribs turned under or partially under the rib above. 
It is hardly necessary to state that with the framework in 
this condition we could not hope to restore the patient to 
health by the use of drugs or in any other manner, except, by 
a skillful manipulation, to adjust the ribs to their normal 
position. In the practice of Osteopathy very many of these 
cases are found, and chronic troubles cured whicTi for 
years have baffled the medical fraternity. In making 
this examination the patient should lie in the position 
named, for if the head is turned slightly, the cervicals are 
out of line; if an arm is thrown above the head, the ribs upon 
that side are drawn slightly upward and turned partially 
upon their edges. It is thus that a dishonest osteopath 
always finds dislocations, shows them to his patient and 
his friends who may be present, and reduces the dislocation 
in a moment without the slightest apparent effort, and so 
skillfully as to give no pain. In these imaginary disloca- 
tions, by freeing and equalizing the circulation, the patient 
is usually made to recover quite rapidly, and never for an 
instant imagines that recovery is not due to the reduction of 
a dislocation. If the vertebra or rib is really partially dis- 
located, and has been in this condition for any great length 
of time, it will take several treatments to return it to normal 
position, and the operation will not be entirely painless. 
The different dislocations of other joints are too familiar to 



PRELIMn'ART MISCELLANEA. 39 

the average physician to require mention in this connection. 

Third: With the patient in the same position, begin- 
ning at the first cervical, witli the first and second fingers of 
the right hand upon each side of the spine, move the hand 
downward slowly and carefully the entire length of the 
spinal column. We are very liable to discover a spot, possi- 
bly no larger than the end of the finger, much warmer or 
colder than the surrounding surface, in which case a con- 
tracted muscle has obstructed the circulation over or to a 
certain nerve-center; and we have ascertained the cause of 
the difiiculty with that part of the anatomy controlled by the 
nerve involved. 

Fourth: Beginning again at the cervicals, and working 
downward a little deeper, we often discover muscles v\^hich 
from their knotted, cord-like appearance lead us to believe 
that they are contracted, interfering with the machinery of 
life. 

Fifth: In making this examination of the spine we 
often discover places very tender to the touch of which the 
patient was entirely ignorant, and upon which a slight pres- 
sure will sometimes cause the patient great pain. Such a 
condition over an important nerve-center is the cause of 
many diseases, which we cannot hope to relieve mthout 
first removing the cause of the congested condition in the 
spine. 

Sixth: Place the patient on the back, the body, head, 
and limbs perfectly straight, the arms at the sides, with 
all muscles relaxed. Examine the ribs once more to dis- 
cover, if possible, any abnormality. Carefully examine the 
neck in all diseases of the head or organic troubles. A con- 
tracted muscle pressing upon the pneumogastric nerve, 
which has so much to do in controlling the viscera, might 



40 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

cause a multitude of evils. While it is well to examine in 
tlie usual manner the liver, stomach, spleen, bowels, kidneys, 
bladder, and other organs, the skilled osteopath has diag- 
nosed the case before leaving the spinal column, and simply 
makes further examinations to satisfy himself that his con- 
clusions are correct. 

Seventh: Always examine the pulse to ascertain the 
action of the heart and the condition of the circulation. 

Eighth: A skilled osteopath seldom looks at the 
tongue, arriving at his diagnosis almost entirely through 
the examination of the spine. Patients often wonder how 
it is possible to discover so readily, without removing the 
clothing, tender spots, of which they knew nothing, along 
the spinal column. In the majority of instances there is 
something in the countenance, the gait, or carriage of the 
chronic invalid that tells the story to one familiar with dis- 
ease. Reasoning from effect to cause, knowing the origin 
of the nerve that controls the diseased organ or limb, it is 
not difficult to detect tender places upon the spinal column, 
neither is it difficult to cure the disease, having located and 
removed the cause. 

A FEW IMPORTANT QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. 

1. What is Osteopathy? 

The human system is a machine capable of running for 
an indefinite length of time, unless interfered with by acci- 
dent, dislocation, or contraction o'f the muscles, obstructing 
the free nerve-force, the free circulation of the blood, or 
other fluids of the body. Osteopathy, based upon a thorough 
knowledge of anatomy and physiology, enables the operator 
to reduce dislocations and to so manipulate the muscles at 



. PRELIMINARY MI8CELLAXEA. 41 

fault as to free the circulation; harmony being thus restored, 
health is the result. 

2. Upon what does an intelligent application of its 
principles depend? 

Upon a complete knowledge of Osteopathy, Anatomy, 
and Physiology. 

3. How may osteopathic treatment aid in the produc- 
tion and maintenance of healthy tissue ? 

(1) By reducing dislocations, thereby freeing nerves or 
arteries that control or nourish certain parts of the anat- 
omy; (2) by stimulating or desensitizing certain nerve-centers, 
thereby controlling the action of the heart, stomach, bowels, 
kidneys, and other organs; (3) by manipulating the muscles, 
thereby freeing the entire circulation. 

4. Give an example of an impaired function caused 
by an abnormal skeleton, and state how the bones may be 
used as levers in correcting the same. 

Constipation, which is sometimes caused by the seventh 
or eighth rib being turned in such a manner as to obstruct 
the free nerve-wave over the great splanhnic, would be a 
happy illustration. In the nervous system, as in the tele- 
graphic, we must have a perfect circuit between headquar- 
ters and all branch offices. In this instance the brain is 
headquarters, and the bowels are the branch office, while the 
great splanchnic and right pneumogastric nerves fonn the 
circuit, which, being obstructed where the great splanchnic 
leaves the spinal column, affects the peristaltic action, caus- 
ing the bowels to act in a weak and halting manner. 

Using the pectoralis major (which attaches to the seven 
or eight upper ribs and inserts into the external bicipital 
ridge of the humerus) and the arm as a lever, placing the 
thumb upon the angle of the rib at fault, by drawing the 



42 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

arm high above the head as the patient inhales, pressing 
hard upon the angle of the rib as the arm is lowered with 
a backward motion, the rib is thrown in its proper articu- 
lation, the circuit is established, and health is the result. 

5. Give an example of some perverted function in some 
organ of the bod}^, and the osteopathic treatment for the 
same. 

Many cases of heart disease are caused by a contraction 
of the adductor muscles of the thigh, obstructing the femoral 
artery or vein. Should the pressure be sufficient to obstruct 
the artery, we have atrophy of the limb on the one side, while 
the heart", overworked in trying to force the blood past the 
obstruction, soon feels the strain. In case the vein, and not 
the artery, is affected, the blood is pumped into the limb and 
failing to properly escape, the anastomoses around the large 
joints become engorged; and perhaps we have a case of in- 
flammatory rheumatism on one side of the obstruction, and 
heart disease on the other. In either case flex the limb 
against the abdomen, abducting the knee strongly and ad- 
ducting the foot as the limb is extended, thus stretching the 
adductors, thereby freeing the circulation. Many cases of 
heart disease and accompanying complications have been 
cured in this simple manner. 

6. What general principles are involved in the osteo- 
pathic treatment of diseases of the respiratory organs, such 
as consumption, asthma, and bronchitis ? 

In diseases of the respiratory organs the intercostal and 
other muscles of the thorax are usually found contracted in 
such a manner as to reduce its dimensions, thus not only 
interfering with deep and full respiration, but with the 
nerve and blood-supply of the pleurse, bronchi, and lungs; 
using the arms, which are attached to the pectoralis major 



PRELIMIXABY MISCELLANEA. 43 

and minor, as levers, drawing them high above the head, 
pressing at the same instant upon the angles of the ribs, as 
the patient inhales, enables the operator to expand the 
chest, thereby freeing the circulation to these organs. Im- 
mediate relief is usually the result of the first treatment. 

7. What are the four great principles that should be 
constantly kept in mind in all osteopathic practice? 

(1) The framework must be perfectly adjusted. (2) The 
circulation must not be obstructed. (3) We must have a 
free and uninterrupted circuit between the brain and each 
muscle and organ of the body. (4) By stimulating or desen- 
sitizing certain nerve-centers, the action of the heart, stom- 
ach, liver, bowels, kidneys, and other organs may be usually 
controlled. 

8. How does the osteopath control fever? 

By light general treatment, and holding the vaso-motor, 
thereby controlling the action of the heart. 

9. How often should an osteopathic treatment be 
given ? 

In acute cases a gentle, careful treatment may be given 
every six hours ; usually once a day is sufficient. The vaso- 
motor may be held in fevers once in four hours; in most 
chronic cases every other day is sufficient. It is much better 
not to treat quite often enough or long enough than to over- 
do matters and exhaust the patient. 

10. How long a time is usually required to give an 
osteopathic treatment? 

This depends so much upon the case and condition that 
it must be left to the judgment of the operator; from ten to 
thirty minutes is usually sufficient. 

11. Has a patient ever been injured by Osteopathy ? 
While many thousands have been cured or benefited 



44 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

by this treatment, we have never heard of a single instance in 
which the patient was injured. When we take into consider- 
ation the fact that nearly all cases treated by the osteopath 
are chronic, in which nearly every other known method of 
treatment has been tried and failed, the results obtained 
by osteopathic treatment are indeed surprising. 

MAN AS A MACHINE. 

The entire skeleton in the adult consists of two hundred 
distinct bones, articulating with each other in perfect har- 
mony. Spme are arranged to allow the utmost freedom of 
motion, others are limited, while others are fixed and immov- 
able. On the bones are many prominences for the attach- 
ment of muscles and ligaments and many openings (or 
foramina) for the entrance of nutrient vessels. 

The thorax is a bony cage formed by the ribs, the dorsal 
vertebrae, and the sternum; it contains the principal organs 
of respiration and circulation. 

Should the muscles of the chest contract, as is often the 
case, springing the ribs, which are the most elastic bones in 
the body, lessening the dimensions of the thorax, we have 
asthma, consumption, or heart disease; while a partial dis- 
location of the lower ribs, caused by contracting muscles, 
causes enlargement of the spleen, stomach trouble, and 
various other diseases, which can readily be cured by 
manipulations. 

There are over five hundred muscles in the human body 
connected with the bones, cartilages, and skin, either directly 
or through the intervention of fibrous structures called ten- 
dons or aponeuroses. Muscles differ much in size; the 
gastrocnemius forms the chief bulk of the back of the leg, 



PEELIMIXAEY MISCELLANEA. 45 

and the fibers of the sartorius are nearly two feet in length-, 
while the stapedius, a small muscle of the internal ear, 
weighs about a grain, and its fibers are less than two lines 
in length. 

Xow, having briefly mentioned the bones and the mus- 
cles, we will touch upon the arteries that nourish this most 
interesting and intricate piece of machinery. 

The course taken by the blood on its way to the various 
parts of the body is called the systemic circulation, on acount 
of its having to make repeatedly the circuit of vessels leading 
to and from the heart. 

The arteries are small cylindrical muscular vessels, and 
might be compared to rivers throwing a branch to each mus- 
cle in their course, while the veins gather up and return the 
venous blood to the heart, where it is pumped through the 
pulmonary arteries to the lungs. 

It will now be readily understood, as the heart is a 
double pumf), driving the blood through the arteries and 
veins, that the contraction of muscles throwing a pressure 
on arteries or veins which pass through, under, or between 
them would certainly affect the heart and necessarily de- 
range the entire system. We trust that our readers will note 
these points carefully, as we expect to prove that many cases 
of heart disease, rheumatism, dropsy, neuralgia, tumor, 
goiter, and cancer are caused by contracted muscles and are 
readily cured by a system of treatment which removes the 
cause and gives Nature a chajice to act 

To illustrate more fully, let us compare the systemic 
circulation to an irrigating system. Through your fields 
run innumerable ditches; one is obstructed by a fallen tree, 
causing the water to back up, seeking some other channel or 
a weak place in the bank to escape. What is the result? 




2i. Patelli 

25. Fibula. 

26. Tlblft. 

27. Calclsand Astrai^alua. 
2R. Cunetform and Cuboid. 
29. Metatarsus. 

SO. Pbolanges of Tocr 



Cut 1.— The Human Skeleton- 



Bones of the Human Skeleton. 



r CRANIUM.... 
(8 bones.) 



[ Frontal (forehead). 

Two Parietal (sides). 
J Two Temporal (sides and base). 
1 Sphenoid (anterior base of the skull). 

Ethmoid (sieve-like bone at root of nose). 

Occipital (back and base of skull). 



THE HEAD -{ f Two Superior Maxillary (upper jaw). 

(2Z bones.) | Inferior MaxiUary (lower jaw). 

I Two Malar (cheeks) 

^.p-c, , Two Lachrymal (in orbit'of eye). 

TVt'C: ■; I Two Turbinated (on sides of nasal fossae). 

(. (14 bones.) Two Nasal (bridge of nose). 

I Vomer (laone between the nostrils). 
t Two Palate (back part of nasal fossse). 



THE TRUNK. 

(54 bones.) 



( Seven Cervical Vertebrae, 
r SPINAL COLUMN.... < Twelve Dorsal Vertebrae. 
(24 bones.) ( Five Lumbar Vertebrae. 

T1TT30 /.ij u ^ 5 Fourteen True Ribs. 

RIBS (24 bones) | rp^^^ p^^g^ rj^s. 

STERNUM (breast bone). 
HYOID (bone at root of tongue). 



PELVIS 

(4 bones.) 



Two Innominata. 

Sacrum. 

Coccyx. 



THE LIMBS .. 

(121 bones.) 



r UPPER LIMBS.. 
(64 bones.) 



I. LOWER LIMBS . 

(60 bones.) 



Shouldee {gSlI: 



, *^., 5 Humerus. 

i ^KM ) Ulna and Radius. 



I C Eight Carpal Bones. 

L Hand ] Five Metacarpal Bones. 

( Fourteen Phalanges. 



( Femur. 
■ Patella, 
f Tibia and Fibula. 



r Leg... 

I 

I ( Seven Tarsal Bones. 

L Foot ■ Five Metatarsal Bones. 

( Fourteen Phalanges. 



48 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

Too much water in one end and too little in the other. Thus 
it is that when confronted with heart disease you should 
immediately ascertain if the patient is troubled with cold 
extremities; such being the case, using the limbs as levers, 
stretch the muscles, thus freeing the arteries from this undue 
pressure, permitting the blood to pass down to and warm 
the extremities, at the same time relieving the heart. 

We will now pass to the nerves, which not only control 
the action of the muscles and various organs, but also con- 
trol the caliber of the arteries, thus regulating (when not 
interfered with by slight dislocations of bone or contraction 
of muscles) with the utmost precision the entire systemic, 
pulmonary, and portal circulation. The central part of the 
nervous system, or cerebro-spinal axis, consists of the spinal 
cord (medulla spinalis), the bulb (medulla oblongata), and 
the brain; the spinal cord being the great bond of connec- 
tion between the brain and the majority of the peripheral 
nerves. As most of the nerves originate in the spinal cord, 
and as the cord is in direct communication with, and might 
be considered part of the brain, it will be readily understood 
that a pressure on any of these nerves, interrupting com- 
munication between the brain and some distant part, will 
cause paralysis of the part controlled by the nerve involved. 

While we have touched but briefly on the anatomy, and 
physiology of the human body, we trust we have proven to 
our readers that man is a machine, and laid the foundation 
for a thorough understanding of our method of treating dis- 
eases by manipulation and without the use of drugs or 
surgical instruments. 




Cut 2. — The Human Thorax and Contents. 



TEE LUNGS. 51 



Diseases in General. 



THE LUNGS. 

The Lungs are the two principal organs of respiration, 
placed one on each side of the chest, separated from each 
other by the heart and other contents of the mediastinum. 
Each lung is divided into two lobes, an upper and lower, by a 
long and deep fissure, which extends from the upper part of 
the posterior border of the organ, about three inches from its 
apex, downward and forward to the lower part of the ante- 
rior border. This fissure penetrates nearly to the root. In 
the right lung the upper lobe is partially subdivided by a 
second and shorter fissure, which extends from the middle of 
the preceding, forward and slightly upward to the anterior 
margin, making a small triangular portion, the middle lobe. 

The right lung is larger and heavier than the left; it is 
broader, owing to the inclination of the heart to the left side ; 
in consequence of the diaphragm rising higher on the right 
side to accommodate the liver, it is also shorter by an inch. 
The weight of the lungs is about forty-two ounces, the right 
lung being two ounces heavier than the left; but much varia- 
tion is met with, according to the amount of blood or serous 
fluid they may contain. The lungs are heavier in the male 
than in the female. 

Each lung is conical in shape, and presents an Apex. 
Base, two Borders, and two Surfaces for examination. 

Apex. — The apex extends into the root of the neck about 



52 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

an incli or an inch and a half above the level of the first rib, 
and forms a tapering cone. 

Base. — The base is concave, broad, and rests upon the 
convex surface of the diaphragm. Its circumference is thin 
and fits into the space betw^een the lower ribs and the costal 
attachment of the diaphragm, extending lovrer down exter- 
nally and behind than in front. 

Borders. — The anterior border is sharp and thin, over- 
lapping the front of the pericardium. The posterior border 
is broad and rounded, and is received into the deep concavity 
on either side of the spinal column. It is much longer than 
the anterior border and projects between the ribs and the 
diaphragm. 

Surfaces. — The surface is smooth, shining, and marked 
out in numerous polyhedral spaces, which indicate the 
lobules of the organ. The area of each of these spaces is 
crossed by numerous lighter lines. The inner surface is con- 
cave; in front presenting a depression corresponding to the 
convex surface of the pericardium; and behinda deep fissure, 
which gives attachment to the root of the lung. The thoracic 
or external surface is smooth and convex; corresponding to 
the form of the cavity of the chest, being deeper behind than 
in front. 

Root. — A little above the middle and inner surface of 
each lung and nearer its posterior than its anterior border is 
its root, by which the lung is connected to the heart and 
trachea. The root is formed "by the bronchial tube, pulmo- 
nary artery, pulmonary vein, the bronchial arteries and 
veins, the pulmonary plexus of nerves, lymphatics, bronchial 
glands, and areolar tissue, all of which are enclosed by a 
reflexion of the pleura. The root of the right lung lies 
behind the superior vena cava and the ascending portion of 



THE LUNGS. 53 

the aorta, and below the vena azygos major. The root of the 
left lung passes beneath the arch of the aorta in front of the 
descending aorta. The phrenic nerve and the anterior pul- 
monary plexus lie in front of each, and the pneumogastric 
and posterior pulmonary plexus behind. 

Substance. — The substance of the lung is of a light, 
porous, spongy texture; it floats in water and crepitates 
when handled, owing to the presence of air in the tissue ; it is 
very elastic, hence the collapsed state of these organs when 
they are removed from the cavity of the thorax. 

Cells. — The air-cells are small, polyhedral recesses, com- 
posed of a fibrillated connective tissue, and surrounded by a 
few involuntary muscular and elastic fibers. They can be 
plainly seen on the surface of the lung, and vary from 1-200 to 
1-70 of an inch in diameter. 

Tubes. — The bronchus, upon entering the substance of 
the lung, di^ddes and subdivides throughout the entire organ ; 
sometimes three branches arise together, and occasionally 
small lateral branches are given off from the sides of a 
larger. Each of the smaller subdivisions of the bronchi 
enters a pulmonary lobule, and is termed a lobular bronchial 
tube or bronchiole. Its walls now begin to present irregular 
dilatations, air-cells, at first sparingly and on the one side of 
the tube only, but as it proceeds onward, these dilatations 
become more numerous and surround the tube on all sides, so 
that it loses its cylindrical character. 

Blood- Vessels. — The pulmonary artery conveys the ven- 
ous blood to the lungs; it divides into branches, which accom- 
pany the bronchial tubes, and terminate in a dense capillary 
network upon the walls of the intercellular passages and 
air-cells. In the lung the branches of the pulmonary artery 



54 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

are usually above and behind the bronchial tube; the vein 
below and in front. 

The pulmonary capillaries form plexuses, which lie imme- 
diately beneath the mucous membranes in the walls and 
septa of the air-cells and of the infundibula. In the septa 
between the air-cells the capillary network forms a single 
layer. The capillaries form a very minute network, the 
meshes of which are smaller than the air-cells themselves; 
their walls are also exceedingly thin; the arteries of neigh- 
boring lobules are distinct from each other and do not 
anastomose, whereas the corresponding venous anastomoses 
are exceedifigly fine. 

The radicles of the pulmonary veins commence in the 
pulmonary capillaries and coalesce into larger branches, 
which accompany the arteries and return the oxygenated 
blood to the left auricle of the heart. The radicles come 
together in the septa between the infundibula, entirely sepa- 
rate from the small arterial ramifications. Those which are 
near the surface of the lungs have an undivided course for 
some distance, and then either unite with some deeper lying 
vein, or form with their companions a wide-meshed super- 
ficial plexus. 

The hronchial arteries supply blood for the nutrition of 
the lung, and are derived from the thoracic aorta, accom- 
panying the bronchial tubes, and are distributed to the 
bronchial glands and upon the walls of the larger bronchial 
tubes and pulmonary vessels. Those supplying the bron- 
chial tubes form the capillary plexus in the muscular coat, 
from which branches are given off to form a second plexus in 
the mucous coat. This plexus in the lobular bronchioles is 
continued with that of the pulmonary artery, and the blood 
which the bronchial artery brings is thus carried back by the 



EXPLANATORY. 55 

pulmonary vein. Others are distributed in the interlobular 
areolar tissue, and terminate partly in the deep and partly in 
the superficial bronchial veins. Some ramify upon the sur- 
face of the lung, beneath the pleura, where they form a 
capillary network. 

The bronchial vein is formed at the root of the lung, 
receiving superficial and deep veins corresponding to the 
branches of the bronchial artery. It does not, however, 
receive all the blood supplied by the artery, as some of it 
passes into the pulmonary vein. It terminates on the right 
side in the vena azygos major, and on the left side in the 
superior intercostal or left upper azygos vein. Some author- 
ities state that in other parts of the lung than in the lobular 
bronchioles, bronchial veins, even those coming from the 
larger bronchial tubes, join more or less freely with pulmo- 
nary veins. The intercostal arteries give small branches to 
the surface of the lungs by way of the ligamentum latum 
pulmonis. 

The lymphatics consist of a superficial and deep set; 
they terminate at the root of the lung in the bronchial glands. 

Nerves. — The nerve-supply of the lungs is from the 
anterior and posterior pulmonary plexus, formed chiefly by 
branches from the sympathetic and pneumogastric. The 
filaments from these plexuses accompany the bronchial 
tubes upon which they are lost. Small ganglia are found 
upon these nerves. 

EXPLANATORY. 

As many of our readers are unfamiliar with anatomy 
and physiology, we have followed Gray quite closely and 
have entered rather deeply into the anatomy of the organs of 
respiration, for several very important reasons. The most 



56 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

important of which is to call attention to the immense and 
complicated blood-supply of the lungs, and the consequent 
importance of a perfect and unobstructed circulation. An- 
other very important point that we discover by referring to 
the anatomy is the fact that the lungs are controlled by 
nerves from the anterior and posterior pulmonary plexus, 
formed chiefly by branches from the sympathetic and pneu- 
mogastric nerves. These nerves are affected either by a 
pressure or stimulation in the neck, or in the spine at about 
the fifth dorsal. 

In any lung trouble of a serious nature, a pressure at the 
last named point causes the patient to cough; the spine is 
also usually very tender in this region. Contracted muscles 
are not only obstructing the circulation, causing congestion, 
but their pressure upon nerves which control the lung causes 
paroxysms of coughing. Very serious cases of lung troubles 
are often cured by simply manipulating and freeing the 
muscles of the spine from the first to the tenth dorsal. 

In the treatment of any and all diseases of the organs of 
respiration, the osteopath has three objects in view, which 
he must accomplish before he can hope to attain results: 

(1) Expansion of the chest. 

(2) Freeing the entire hlood-supply to and through the 
affected parts. 

(3) Freeing and equalizing the nerve-wave. 

It is absolutely impossible to lay down a line of treat- 
ment that will be applicable in all the complications arising 
in different cases; hence a great deal will depend on the 
operator constantly keeping these points in mind, and apply- 
ing the treatment which seems best adapted to suit the case. 

The osteopath cares very little for names, simply deal- 




Cut 3. — Vibration. 



EXPLANATORY. 59 

ing with conditions as they arise, seeking by a skillful manip- 
ulation to remove the cause. 

By using the arms as levers we can expand the chest. 

By vibration and a skillful manipulation of the muscles we 
can equalize the circulation. 

By a pressure upon the vaso-motor center in the upper cer- 
vical region we can control fever. 

Acting upon the above principles, and applying the 
treatment as given for acute, chronic, or capillary bronchitis, 
asthma, or consumption, as the similarity of the case to 
either of the above diseases would indicate, or by a combina- 
tion of any of these treatments, as the judgment of the oper- 
ator would dictate, we can hope either to relieve or cure a 
very large per cent of the diseases of the respiratory organs. 



—5- 



60 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 



Diseases of the Bronchi, Lungs, and Pleurae. 



ASTHMA. 
(Paroxysmal dyspnea, with oppression.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Kecurrent and temporary difficulty in breathing, ac- 
companied by a wheezing sound and a sense of constriction 
in the throat, with cough and expectoration. Authors 
distinguish two varieties: dry convulsive or nervous, 
and humid or common. In the first variety the attacks are 
sudden and violent and of short duration, the sense of con- 
striction is hard, dry, and spasmodic, the cough slight, and 
expectoration scanty and only appearing toward the end of 
the paroxysm. In the second variety the paroxysm is grad- 
ual and protracted, the constriction heavy, laborious, and 
humid, the cough violent, and expectoration commences 
early, and is at first scanty and viscid, but afterward copious, 
affording great relief. In many cases the attack is in the 
night, and most frequently an hour or two after midnight. 

CAUSE. 

Asthma, pronounced incurable by the medical fraternity, 
can be relieved, and inmost cases cured, by an application 
of the principles laid down in the following pages. 

The thorax is a bony cage, formed by the ribs, dorsal ver- 
tebrae, and sternum, containing and protecting the principal 
organs of circulation and respiration. The ribs are not only 



BFOXCHI, LUNGS, AND PLEl'R.^. 61 

very elastic, but, being connected AAith the sternum by costo- 
cartilage and with the dorsal yertebrre by ligaments, haye 
limited motion. Thus it will be seen that they are easily 
affected by accident or contraction of the muscles. In most 
cases of asthma a slight depression will be noticed oyer the 
second, third, and fourth ribs on the left side, about two 
inches to the left of the median line, while the cartilaginous 
portion of the corresponding ribs on the right side will be 
found eleyated; occasionally this will be reyersed, but in 
either case it is proof positiye that the framework which is 
supposed to protect the vital machinery of life is out of 
gear. 

The great Creator, in His infinite wisdom, has arranged 
for just such an emergency as this by preparing a system of 
leyers, one of which we will now use in raising the ribs, 
stretching the intercostal muscles, and expanding the chest. 

The pectoralis major, a large muscle which covers the 
entire front of the chest, attaching to the sternal half of the 
clavicle (collar-bone), the six or seven upper ribs, and the 
cartilages of all the true ribs, is inserted by a flat tendon 
into the external bicipital ridge of the humerus about two 
or three inches below the shoulder-joint. If you will raise 
your arm high above the head, you will feel all the upper 
ribs move, thus proving that our theory is correct. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the back, with a pillow under 
the head. Two assistants at the head of the table; one places 
his right, the other his left hand under the patient's shoulders 
on the angle of the second rib, half way between the 
scapula (shoulder-blade) and spine and one inch above the 
scapula. With the disengaged hands take the patient's 



62 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

wrists, and, slowly drawing the arms upward high above 
the head (see cut 4), pull steadily and strongly for a mo- 
ment; at the same time with the fingers press steadily on 
the angle of the ribs. Lower the arms slowly, the elbows 
passing below and to the sides of the table. Move the fingers 
down the spine one inch, to the angle of the next rib, and 
draw up the arms as before; repeat until you have raised 
the four or five upper ribs. It will be also observea tnat 
this operation stretches the intercostal muscles. 

2. The patient will now be seated upon a stool. The 
operator places his knee between the shoulders, grasps the 
patient's wrists and raises the arms slowly but strongly high 
above th'e head, pressing hard with the knee and lowering 
the arms with a backward motion (see cut 5). 

Each time as the arms are drawn upward the patient 
should inhale, filling the lungs to their utmost capacity, 
exhaling as the arms reach their normal position. 

.3. Standing beside the patient, with one hand upon 
each side of thorax, press the ribs forward and upward, 
holding them in this position while the patient fills the 
lungs with air. 

4. Place the patient upon the back; and, with ;the 
fingers of one hand pressing upon the angle of the first rib 
which is depressed, with the other hand pressing outward 
and downward upon the cartilages of the ribs that are 
thrown forward towards the sternum, have an assistant 
draw the arm upon the side where the depression has been 
discovered, high and strong above the head, the uatient fill- 
ing the lungs to their utmost capacity. Lower the arm 
with a backward motion, the elbow passing below the edge 
of the table, at the same instant pressing hard with the 
fingers upon the angle of the rib, and with the other hand 




Cut. 4. — Expanding the Chest. 




Cut 5.— Expanding the Chest. 



BRONCHI, LUNGS, AND PLEURA. 67 

upon the cartilage which is thrown toward the sternum 
(cut 6). 

5. Place the hand lightly upon the thorax, and vibrate 
gently for two minutes over that portion of the lungs or 
bronchi which seems to be affected. See Vibration (pages 
36 and 67. 

It is very important in all cases of lung trouble that 
vibration should be given, as it assists in starting, stimulat- 
ing, and equalizing the circulation through the lungs and 
bronchial tubes, and very materially aids in the recovery of 
the patient. We might mention in this connection one case, 
of a lady, who had been unable to lie down without having 
a paroxysm for over four years, and after two weeks' regular 
treatment showed no signs of improvement. After the first 
vibration a marked change was noticed for the better, and 
in four weeks a complete cure was effected. Instant relief 
is often experienced after the first treatment, and a continua- 
tion of the treatment seldom fails to effect a cure. 

Coughs, colds on the lungs, short difficult breathing, 
and pleurisy never fail to respond quickly to our Asthma 
treatment. Of the numerous cases treated by us in this man- 
ner, 90 per cent have been cured and all benefited. 

This entire treatment should occupy about fifteen min- 
utes, and be given in acute or stubborn cases each day; in 
milder forms, every other day is sufficient. 

VIBRATION. 

Vibrations might be compared to fine shaking move- 
ments,in which the whole or part of the palmar surface of 
the fingers or hand is used. The benefit to be derived from 
this treatment depends so largely upon the manner in which 
it is administered, and the treatment is so applicable in such 



68 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

a variety of cases, that we cannot be too particular in educat- 
ing ourselves to vibrate correctly. Place the hand lightly 
upon the patient, using no pressure. The movements at the 
elbow are flexion and extension, while those of the wrist are 
adduction and abduction. The vibrations are produced 
through a succession of quick individual movements. There 
should be no straining of the muscles in the operator's arm, 
or strong contractions of the muscles of the hand, arm, or 
shoulder. When given correctly, with the hand on the 
anterior surface, of the thorax, the vibrations can be easily 
felt by the other hand placed upon the back of the patient; 
while with a stiff hand and arm no motion can be distin- 
guished upon the back. To further give an idea of how 
delicately the movements should be made, place a tumbler 
of water upon a table, and if the vibrations are given abso- 
lutely correct upon the same, the water will not move from 
side to side, but simply quicken in the center. The table 
should be fairly large to make a fair test. 

PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS, OR CONSUMPTION. 
(Atrophy of the lungs, characterized by tubercle bacillus.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

The special symptoms are a short and tickling cough; 
the pain in the chest is slight, and there is either a sense of 
tenderness or weight experienced at the upper part of the 
lungs; the breathing is habitually short, and a full inspira- 
tion is impracticable, the attempt increasing the sense of 
weight and soreness or aggravating the cough; the expecto- 
rations are generally scanty and small in quantity in the 
early stages, and in many cases are very trifling throughout ; 
the matter expectorated is watery and whey-like, sometimes 




Cut 6.— Raising Depressed Ribs. 



BROXCHI, LUNGS, AND PLEURA. 71 

tinged with blood, and as the disease progresses thick, tena- 
cious, curdy, or cheesy particles are excreted. As the 
functional powers of the lungs become impaired the pulse 
becomes frequent and feeble, the breathing grows shorter; 
irregular chills come on, succeeded by some degree of feverish 
heat, and in the last stages night-sweats, diarrhea, swelling 
«f the limbs, etc., denote the rapidly approaching fatal termi- 
nation. The local condition of the part diseased is one of 
engorgement, and its secretions are changed from a healthy 
to a morbid condition. 

CAUSE. 

It is a well-known fact that cold will contract not only 
iron and steel, but the muscles of the human body. To prove 
our theory is correct, allow a cold draught of air to strike the 
neck for a short time, and possibly the next morning you 
have a stiff neck; the head does not turn frep]y on its axis: 
the muscles that were exposed have contracted and are a 
little too short. Acting on these principles, we trace con- 
sumption to the contracted muscles of the chest, which are 
forcing the elastic ribs down upon the pleurae and lungs. The 
old idea is that as the lungs decay the ribs settle. How 
absurd to imagine that the soft, spongy lungs support the 
chest! As well say that a house full of sponges would hold 
up the roof. 

We have established the fact, beyond the shadow of a 
doubt, that it is the steady pressure of the contracting mus- 
cles that causes this dread disease, and experience has taught 
us that until tuberculosis sets in it can be cured. 



TREATMENT. 

ent on the right 
ator, his left arm flexed, the elbow resting on the right arm of 



1. Place the patient on the right side, facing the oper- 



72 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the operator, pressing against the humerus, thus making a 
lever of the patient's arm to stretch the muscles of the 
shoulder and scapula. The patient must allow his muscles 
to relax as much as possible. The operator will now place 
his hands in the position shown in cut 7. With the finger- 
ends close to the spine, pressing quite hard, using the arm 
as a lever, with a circular motion move the muscles under the 
hand toward the head. 

Do not let the hands slip on the spine, as that would be 
simply rubbing. Our object is to loosen and stretch the 
muscles, thus freeing the vital forces of life from any obstruc- 
tion and equalizing the circulation. After each upward 
motion, move the hands down one inch, keeping close to the 
spine and working deep the entire length of the spinal col- 
umn. The left side will now be treated in a like manner. 

2. Place the patient on the back ; one operator placing 
the right hand, the other the left, under the patient's 
shoulders, the fingers pressing hard upon the angles of the 
first rib, with the disengaged hands grasp the patient's 
wrists ; as the patient fills the lungs with air, draw the arms 
slowly and very strongly high above the head (cut 4) ; lower 
the arms with a backward motion, pressing hard upon the 
angles of the ribs, the elbows passing below the sides of the 
table. Repeat this operation with each successive rib, as 
low as the lower border of the scapula. It will be observed 
that this treatment expands the thorax, thereby increasing 
the breathing capacity of the lungs and also freeing the 
circulation. 

3. Place the hand lightly upon the chest, and vibrate 
gently over the diseased lung for two minutes. See Vibra- 
tion pages 36 and 67). 

4. Place the patient upon a stool ; the operator places 




Cut 7. — Spinal Treatment. 



BRONCHI, LUNGS, AND PLEURJE. 75 

his knees between the shoulders, grasps the wrists, and 
raises the arms slowly but strongly high above the head. 
pressing hard with the knee as he lowers the arms with a 
backward motion. Patient should always be instructed to 
inhale when the arms are raised. All manipulations must be 
slow, careful, and strong; particular care should be taken in 
treating thoroughly through the upper dorsal region, as it 
is here, in these diseases, that we usually find contracted 
muscles pressing upon ners^e-centers which control the lungs, 
thereby causing or aggravating the condition. 

The patient can usually be relied upon to caution the 
operator if too much strength is being used, 

A thorough treatment every other day is usually enough 
to produce the best results, as Nature must be given a chance 
to do her part. Light cases of lung trouble can be cured in 
two weeks by this treatment, and the most stubborn, pro- 
vided tuberculosis has not set in, in from eight weeks to three 
months. 

5. We have recently discovered that stimulation of 
the spleen by vibration will increase the corpuscular rich- 
ness of the blood, thereby aiding in the removal of morbid 
elements from the system. 

This entire treatment should not occupy over fifteen or 
twenty minutes. 

ACUTE BRONCHITIS. 

(Inflammation of the bronchial tubes.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Light fever; pain in chest; tickling in the throat; sore- 
ness under the sternum; sense of oppression in the chest; 

—6— 



76 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

soreness, due to straining the muscles when coughing; ex- 
pectoration, at first viscid, subsequently muco-purulent. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon a stool; and, with the knee 
between the scapulae, raise the arms high above the head, 
the patient inhaling as the arms are raised ; press hard with 
the knee, lowering the arms with a backward motion (cut 5). 
Repeat three or four times, as this movement expands the 
chest and frees the circulation to the lungs and bronchi. 

2. Place the patient upon the back; with one hand 
under the chin, the other under the occipital bone (cut 8), 
give thorough extension, being careful not to rotate the head. 

3. Pulling gently upon the chin, rotate the head as 
far as possible from side to side, thus stretching the muscles 
of the neck, and thereby freeing the circulation to the head, 
also freeing the pneumogastric nerve, which sends filaments 
10 the bronchi and lungs; also manipulate the muscles and 
trachea very thoroughly as low as the sternum, moving the 
trachea upward as much as possible, as this movement mate- 
rially assists in freeing the circulation. 

The treatment, while thorough and deep, should be so 
very gentle as to give no unnecessary pain. 

4. Standing in front of patient, place the hands upon 
each side of the neck, the fingers almost meeting over the 
spines of the upper cervicals; tip the head backward and 
press gently for two or three minutes to reduce the fever 
(cut 35). 

It is at this point that we can reach the vaso-motor 
nerve-center, a steady pressure upon which will reduce 
almost any fever. See Vaso-motor. 




Cut 8. — Extension of Neck. 



BRONCHI, LUNGS, AND PLEURA. 79 

5. Vibrate gently over the affected part. See Vibra- 
tion (pages 86 and 67). 

This entire treatment should not occupy over fifteen 
minutes. Immediate relief is usually experienced; and a 
ie\\ treatments, given one each day, will effect a speedy cure. 

CHRONIC BRONCHITIS. 
(Kesults from repeated attacks of the acute form.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
It usually first makes its appearance as a winter cough, 
becoming continuous subsequently; the breath is short; 
muco-purulent expectoration. 

TREATMENT. 
The treatment for chronic bronchitis is the same as in 
the acute form, with the exception that treatments need not 
be given oftener than every other day. While we may look 
for the same results, it will take from two to three months 
to effect a cure. 

CAPILLARY BRONCHITIS. 
(Inflammation of the smallest bronchia, and usually 

secondary.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
This disease is most common in children and old people; 
the respiration is hurried, and, in addition to other symp- 
toms, the cough is severe; expectoration scanty; the pulse 
rapid, with moderate fever. 

TREATMENT. 
1. Place the patient upon the back; and, with the 
right hand beneath the left shoulder, the fingers pressing 



80 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

upon the angle of the first rib, with the left hand grasp the 
patient's left wrist, and draw the arm high above the head 
(cut 9) ; press hard upon the angle of the rib as the arm is 
lowered with a backward motion, the elbow passing below 
the edge of the table. Work in this manner as low as the 
eighth rib, the patient inhaling each time as the arm is raised. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. This treatment 
moves the ribs, stretches the intercostal muscles, expands 
the chest, and frees the entire circulation to the bronchia, an 
obstruction of which causes inflammation of the smallest 
bronchia. 

2. See 2, 3, 4, and 5, Acute Bronchitis (page 75). 

FIBRINOUS BRONCHITIS. 

(Usually chronic, and is characterized by expectoration of 

fibrinous casts.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Paroxysmal cough; a decided cyanosis — a diseased con- 
dition of the circulation, causing a livid, bluish color in the 
skin; — dyspnea — labored and difficult breathing; — there may 
be bleeding from the nose. This disease is more common in 
males. 

TREATMENT." 

By expanding the chest, vibration, or any manipulation 
which will free the circulation, we can hope for good results. 
But a very small per cent of these cases are cured. See 
Chonic Bronchitis (page 79). 

PUTRID BRONCHITIS. 
(May accompany other bronchial affections, and is charac- 
terized by inflammation and ulceration of the bronchial 
mucous membrane.) 




Cut 9.— Expanding the Chest. 



BRONCHI, LUNGS, AND PLEUR.^. . 83 

SYMPTOMS. 
Irregular fever; occasional chills; cough; breath and 
sputa highly offensive. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease is seldom cured by Osteopathy, but is some- 
times greatly benefited. For treatment, see Chronic Bron- 
chitis (page 79). 

BRONCHIECTASIS. 

(Dilatation of the bronchi.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Usually complicated with other bronchial troubles; dif- 
ficult breathing; paroxysmal cough; mucus, pus, and casts 
of tubules in the sputa; more common in males. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease is sometimes benefited by osteopathic treat- 
ment. See Chronic Bronchitis (page 79). 

CATARRHAL PNEUMONIA OR BRONCHO-PNEUMONITIS. 

(Inflammation of the lungs, beginning with the bronchi.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Harsh breathing; shallow respiration; temperature ele- 
vated; muco-purulent expectoration; and cough. 

TREATMENT. 
1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, with the finger-tips close to the spine, move 
the muscles upward and outward with a circular motion, 
gently but deep, the entire length of the spinal column. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. Tender spots 
will be found about the third or fourth dorsal, upon which a 



84 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

pressure will cause the patient to cough; manipulate very 
thoroughly over these nerves. 

2. Place the patient on the back; the hand resting 
lightly upon the thorax immediately over the right lung, 
vibrate gently one minute. Treat the opposite lung in a 
similar manner. See Vibration (pages .36 and 67). 

3. Place the right hand under patient's left shoulder, 
the fingers pressing upon the angles of the second rib ; with 
the left hand draw patient's left arm high and strong above 
the head as the patient inhales. Press hard upon the angle 
of the rib as the arm is lowered with a backward motion 
(cut 9). Work in this manner as low as the eighth dorsal. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. Great caution 
must be exercised not to fatigue or exhaust the patient. 

4. Place the left hand under the chin, drawing the 
head gently backward and to the right, at the same instant 
manipulating the muscles upon the left side of the neck with 
the right hand. Treat the opposite side and front of the 
neck in a similar manner. This treatment frees the circula- 
tion to the head, also frees and stimulates the pneumogastric 
nerve, filaments of which assist in controlling the lungs. 

5. Place the hands upon each side of the neck, the 
finger-tips almost meeting over the spines of the upper 
cervicals; press gently with the fingers three or four minutes 
upon the vasomotor to control the fever. See Vaso-motor. 
The treatment should be given each day, and should not 
occupy over fifteen or twenty minutes. 

ACUTE MILIARY TUBERCULOSIS. 
(Uissemin-atlng tuberculosis. May involve several organs.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Very similar to those of acute bronchitis; rapid pulse; 



BROXCHI, LUXGS, AAD PLEURA. 85 

high fever; delirium; profuse perspiration; prostration; and 
symptoms of intoxication. 
Xo cure in Osteopathy. 

INTERSTITIAL PNEUMONITIS. 
(Induration of the lungs, by interstitial over-growth of 
fibrous tissue. Due to inhaling particles of dust, steel 
or cotton.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Curvature of the spinal column ; shoulders drawn down ; 
chest retracted; ribs drawn together; heart displaced to- 
wards the affected side. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA. 
(Dilatation — produced by the infiltration of air — of the air- 
cells of the lungs.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Very distressing cough; difficult breathing; scanty ex- 
pectoration; enlarged chest; ribs fixed in position of full 
inspiration; expectoration is attended with a succession of 
puffs. More common in males. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

PULMONARY CONGESTION. 

(Excessive amount of blood in the lungs, which diminishes 

the air-space.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Cough; difficult breathing; increased fremitus, — vibra- 
tion, or thrils; — and bloody expectoration. 



86 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

In the treatment of this disease it is very necessary to 
use our utmost endeavor to free the circulation to and from 
the lungs, if we hope to relieve their congested condition. 

1. Place patient upon the side; beginning at the last 
cervical vertebra, the finger-tips barely touching the spine, 
move the muscles upward and outward with a circular 
motion, gently but deep, the entire length of the dorsal 
region. The spine will usually be found in a very sensitive 
condition, particularly between the third and the sixth 
dorsal, where a pressure of the hand will instantly produce 
a paroxysm of coughing. Treatment in this region should be 
very thorough. Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Place the patient upon the back ; one operator plac- 
ing the left, the other the right hand, beneath the shoulders, 
the fingers pressing upon the angles of the second ribs; with 
the disengaged hands grasp the patient's wrists, drawing 
the arms gently but strongly above the head, the patient 
filling the lungs with air; press hard with the fingers upon 
the angles of the ribs as the arms are lowered with a back- 
ward motion. Move the fingers to the next ribs below, and 
repeat the operation until the sixth rib is reached. This 
treatment expands the chest, and usually gives immediate 
relief. 

3. Place the hand lightly upon the thorax, over the 
right lung, and vibrate gently for one minute. See Vibration 
(pages 36 and 67). Treat the other lung in a similar manner. 
This treatment tends to equalize and free the circulation 
in the congested lung. 

Care must be exercised, in giving this treatment, not to 
unduly fatigue or exhaust the patient; on the contrary, if the 



BRONCHI, LUNGS, AND PLEURA, 87 

treatment is given in a correct manner, the patient will feel 
refreshed and invigorated. 

It is always well after each treatment to place the hand 
upon the sides of the neck, finger-tips almost meeting over 
the upper cervicals, and press gently for three or four min- 
utes upon the vaso-motor to reduce the fever and quiet the 
patient. See Vaso-motor. 

PULMONARY EDEMA. 

(Serous exudation into the air-cells of the lungs.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Similar to congestion, but in a more aggravated form; 

large quantities of sero-mucoid fluid is expectorated; moist 

r^les, — sounds additional to that of respiration, heard on 

auscultation of the chest, — are detected. Often occurs with 

heart disease, or may be associated with dropsical conditions. 

TREATMENT. 
This disease is very seldom cured, but is sometimes bene- 
fited by osteopathic treatment. See Pulmonary Congestion 
(page 85). 

PULMONARY ABSCESS. 

(Abscess of the lungs. Always secondary, and must be 

considered in connection with its cause.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Sputum is copious, purulent, and often offensive, and 
contains elastic fibers. 

TREATMENT. 
This disease is often benefited and sometimes cured by 
the Pulmonary Congestion treatment (page 85), being very 



88 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

particular to give thorough vibration (pages 36 and 67) imme- 
diately over the abscess. 

PULMONARY THROMBOSIS AND EMBOLISM. 

(Plugging of the pulmonary artery or its branches by coagu- 
lation in the right heart or veins.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pain in the chest; rapid breathing; craving for air; an 
intense dyspnea; heart's action irregular; temperature may 
be below normal, but may rise later. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

PULMONARY GANGRENE. 
(Mortification of the lungs. Frequently results from pneu- 
monia. Is always secondary, and due to obstruction.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
A brownish purulent expectoration, having a gangren- 
ous odor, and containing fragments of lung tissue; fever. 
No cure in Osteopathy. 

CROUPOUS PNEUMONIA, OR LUNG FEVER. 
(Inflammation of the lung tissue. Characteristically accom- 
panied by fever reaching its height about the ninth day, 
local pain, cough, expectoration, and dyspnea. Fre- 
quently complicated with other diseases.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Croupous pneumonia generally comes on insidi3usly,with 
restlessness and feverish disturbance, and sometimes has 
made great progress before the true character of the disease 
has been discovered. There is a deep-seated, dull pain 
beneath the breast-bone or shoulder-blade; a great feeling 



BROXCEI, LUXGS, AXD PLEl'RJE. gy 

of illness: frequent short cougli, with expectoration of viscid 
matter of a green, yellow, or pale color, sometimes tinged 
with blood, which forms such tenacious masses that inver- 
sion of the vessel containing them will not detach them. 
Profuse green expectoration is a serious symptom. The 
breathing is hurried and difficult, the skin hot, especially in 
the regions of the armpits and ribs; there is no moisture in 
the nostrils, and there exists great thirst. If the disease is 
unchecked, the face often exhibits patches of redness and 
lividity and the blood-vessels of the neck become swollen and 
Turgid. The patient may sink either from exhaustion or 
obstruction of the lungs. 

There is shortness and jerkiness of breath, breathing 
forty or fifty times a minute; red spot on the cheek of the 
side affected; low or whispering voice; chills; fever; full, 
rapid pulse; sharp pain in the chest; cough dry, then in two 
days the expectoration becomes rusty and bloody. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward the 
entire length of the spinal column, gently but deep. Treat 
the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Place the patient on the back; with one hand 
under the chin, the other under the occipital bone, give 
gently extension and rotation of the neck. Also manipulate 
all muscles of the neck, carefully but very thorough and deep, 

3. Place the left hand under the right shoulder, 
fingers resting upon the angle of the second rib; draw the 
right arm very gently, but strong, above the head as the 
patient inhales; lower the arm with a backward motion, 
pressing hard upon the angle of the rib at the same instant. 



90 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

Treat the third, fourth, and fifth ribs in a similar manner, 
and repeat the operation on the opposite side. 

4. Place the hand lightly over the right liing and 
vibrate (pages 36 and 67) gently two minutes. Treat the 
opposite lung in a similar manner. 

5. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, the 
fingers almost meeting over the spines of the upper cervicals ; 
tip the head backward, pressing hard upon the vaso-motor 
center for five minutes, to reduce the fever. 

This treatment, if the case is taken in any reasonable 
time, will give immediate relief, and a continuation of the 
treatment a speedy cure. 

Treatment will occupy about fifteen or twenty minutes, 
and should be given each day. 

PNEUMOTHORAX. 

(Air in the pleural cavity.) 
SYMPTOMS. 
Shallow, hurried breathing; pain in the chest; metallic 
tinkling may be heard; chest distended on the affected side. 

TREATMENT. 
This disease is very difficult to manage, but is sometimes 
benefited by our Asthma treatment (page 60). 

ACUTE PLEURISY. 

(Inflammation of the pleura.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Sharp and stabbing pain in the side; difficult breathing; 

fever; cough; the pain generally on a level with the nipple, 

usually anteriorly to the axilla. 




Cut 10.— Raising a Rib. 




Cut 11.— Raising the Ribs. 



BRONCHI, LUNGS, AND PLEURA. 95 

TREATMENT. 

1. Trace the rib or ribs under which the pain is 
located to their angle near the spine; place the thumb of the 
right hand, should the seat of pain be located in the left side, 
apon the angle of the first rib above the seat of pain; with 
the left hand draw patient's left arm high and very strong 
above the head (cut 10) as the patient fills the lungs to their 
utmost capacity; press hard with the thumb as the arm is 
lowered with a backward motion. Apply the same treat- 
ment to the next two lower ribs. 

This treatment seldom fails to give instant relief; and 
two or three treatments usually effect a cure. 

2. Should the case prove stubborn and fail to respond 
to the above treatment, stand behind the patient, who should 
be seated upon a stool, and place the thumbs on each side of 
the spine upon the angles of the third ribs; the assistant 
stands in front and grasps the patient's wrists, raising the 
arms slowly with great strength high above the head (cut 11), 
the patient inhaling, and relaxing all muscles. This treat- 
ment stretches the intercostal muscles and expands the chest, 
thereby freeing the blood-supply to the pleura, an obstruction 
of which has caused its congested condition. Always press 
hard upon the angles of the ribs as the arms are lowered with 
a backward motion, the patient permitting the elbows to 
bend. Place the thumbs upon the angles of the fourth ribs, 
while the assistant raises the arms as before. This operation 
should be repeated until we are below the seat of pain. 

This treatment usually gives immediate relief, and 
always effects a cure in a very short time. Treatment should 
be given once each day, until a cure is effected. All manipu- 
lations, while strong, should be slow and gentle, great care 
being exercised to give no unnecessary pain. 



96 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CHRONIC PLEURISY. 

(Results from acute attacks.) 
SYMPTOMS. 
Curvature of the spine; chest contracted; heart dis- 
placed; scapula dislocated, and shoulder deformed; chills; 
sweats; and accelerated pulse. 

TREATMENT. 
Chronic, cases of pleurisy which have not reached what 
might reasonably be considered an incurable stage can be 
relieved, and a very large per cent cured, by a continuation of 
the treatjnent as laid down for Acute Pleurisy (page 60). 
Treatment should be given every other day, and should 
occupy not over ten minutes. We may expect a cure, accord- 
ing to the nature of the case, in from one to three months. 

EMPYEMA. 
(Effusion of pus into the pleural cavity.) 
SYMPTOMS. 
If the effusion is on the right side, the diaphragm and 
liver are depressed; if on the left, the heart is displaced and 
the apex beat is found in the epigastrium; palpable vibra- 
tions of the chest walls absent; heart action rapid, and pulse 
feeble. 

TREATMENT. 
This disease, although sometimes benefited, is seldom 
cured by Osteopathy. 

1, A light treatment, as in Pleurisy, should be given 
(see page 60). 

2. Place the patient on the back; the hand resting 
lightly over the diseased portion of the pleura, vibrate 



BEOKCHI, LUXGS, AXD PLEURA. 97 

gently for three or four minutes. See Vibration (pages 36 
and 67). 

HYDROTHORAX. 

(Dropsy of the chest. Usually occurs in the course of 
debilitating diseases.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

General sj-mptoms of effusion; difficult breathing, 
relieved only by an upright position; no symptoms of 
inflammation. 

Xo cure in Osteopathy. 

HEMOTHORAX. 

(Effusion of blood into the pleural cavity. May result from 
rupture of an aneurism, or may be in connection with a 
serous effusion; if the latter, it likely indicates carci- 
noma, or tuberculous disease.) 

SY^MPTOMS. 

General symptoms of effusion, such as no pain or fric- 
tional sound; enlargement of the affected side; displace 
ment of the organs; diminution of movement. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

INTERCOSTAL NEURALGIA, OR PLEURODYNIA. 

(Pain in the intercostal muscles.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
A constant aching or burning pain, aggravated by turn- 
ing, twisting, or breathing; the side is also sensitive to touch; 
it often leaves one side and attacks the other. 



98 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 
TMs disease can usually be quickly relieved, and while 
somewhat slow, can be nearly always cured by our Acute 
Pleurisy Treatment (page 60). 

DIAPHRAGMATIC PLEURISY. 

(Inflammation of the pleura involving the diaphragm). 
SYMPTOMS. 
Greater elevation of temperature than in ordinary pleu- 
risy; pain in the epigastrium ; hiccough; vomiting; nausea; 
intense dyspnea; peritonitis may occur at any time. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Acute Pleurisy (page 60). 

2. Standing behind the patient, place the fingers upon 
the transverse processes of the third, fourth, and fifth cervi- 
j^al vertebrae ; press the muscles forward and slip the fingers 
down in front of the transverse processes, where a pressure 
can be exerted upon the phrenic nerve, near its origin (cut 
12). This nerve controls the diaphragm, and a pressure at 
this point breaks the nerve-wave to this muscle, and conse- 
quently slows its action, as is fully explained under the head 
of Hiccoughs. The phrenic nerve should be held about 
two minutes. 

3. Place the hand lightly over the pit of the stomach 
and vibrate gently two minutes. 

4. Press gently upon the stomach, slowly increasing 
the pressure, until as much strength is exerted as patient can 
endure without too much inconvenience. 

Standing beside the patient, place one hand upon each 
side of the neck, the first fingers resting against the occipital 
bone, the index fingers meeting over the spine of the upper 




Cut 12.— Holding the Phernic Nerve. 




Cut 13. — Holding the Vaso-Motor. 



BRONCHI, LUNGS, AND PLEURA. 103 

cervicals ; tip the head slightly backward, press gently with 
the fingers for three or four minutes upon the vaso-motor 
center (cut 13), thus reducing the fever. See Vaso-motor. 

Treatment should be given every day, occupying about 
fifteen minutes. 



104 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 



Diseases of the Heart and Blood- Vessels. 



THE HEART. 

The heart is a hollow, muscular organ, of a conical form, 
placed between the lungs and enclosed in the cavity of 
the pericardium. It is placed obliquely in the chest, the 
broad attached end, or base, upward, backward, and to the 
right, and^ corresponds to the interval between the fifth and 
eighth dorsal vertebrae; the apex is directed downward, for- 
ward, and to the left, and corresponds to the space between 
the cartilages of the fifth and sixth ribs, three-quarters of 
an inch to the inner side, and an inch and a half below the 
left nipple. The heart is placed behind the lower two-thirds 
of the sternum, and projects farther into the left than into 
the right cavity of the chest, extending from the median line 
about three inches in the former direction and only one 
and one-half inches in the latter. In the adult it measures 
five inches in length, three inches and a half in the broadest 
part, and two inches and a half in thickness. The average 
weight in the male varies from ten to twelve ounces, and in 
the female from eight to ten. It continues to increase in 
weight, also in length, breadth, and thickness, up to an 
advanced period of life. The heart of man and warm-blooded 
animals may be said to be made up of two muscular sacs, the 
Pulmonary and Systemic pumps, or, as they are commonly 
called, the right and left sides of the heart. Between these 
no communication exists after birth. Each of these sacs 
may be divided into two chambers. One, acting as an ante- 



HEART AXD BLOOD-VESSELS. 105 

chamber, receives the blood from the yeins; it has very thin 
walls, and is called the Auricle; the other, the Ventricle, is 
the powerful muscular chamber which pumps the blood into 
and distends the arteries. 

Innervation of the Heart. — TS'hen the heart is removed 
from the body, or when all the nerves which pass to it are 
divided, it still beats for some time, so that its movement 
must depend upon some mechanism situated within itself. 
The movement lasts longer in cold-blooded animals (frog and 
turtle), extending even to days, than in mammals. A rab- 
bit's heart beats from three to thirty-six minutes after it is 
out of the body. The average of many experiments is eleven 
minutes. If the heart has ceased to beat, it may be excited 
to action for a short time by direct stimulation, more espe- 
cially by heat. The ordinarj- rhythmical movements of the 
heart are undoubtedly associated with the presence of nerve 
ganglia which exist in the surface of the heart, but the 
movements of the heart are influenced by nervous impulses 
which reach it from without. 

The cardiac plexus is composed of the following nerves : 
The cardiac branches of the vagus, a branch of the same 
name from the external branch of the superior laryngeal, a 
branch from the inferior laryngeal, and sometimes branches 
from the pulmonary plexus of the vagus; the superior, 
middle, inferior, and lowest cardiac branches of the three 
cervical and the first thoracic ganglia; the inconstant twig 
of the descending branch of the hypoglossal nerve, which 
arises from the upper cervical ganglion. From the plexus 
there proceeds the deep and superficial nerves. 

It will be observed that the nerves which form the 
cardiac plexus are composed of branches of nerves which can 
be reached by direct pressure, either in the cervical or upper 



106 * OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

dorsal region; hence the osteopath, by thorough knowledge 
of anatomy, is enabled to so manipulate these nerves as to 
slow or quicken the action of the heart. 

It has been found that stimulation of the cervical por- 
tion of the spinal cord causes quickening of the heart-beat, 
while a steady pressure on the same nerve-centers slows the 
action of the heart. It is thus that in fever, working from 
this center, we slow the heart's action, and are thereby en- 
abled to reduce any fever in an incredibly short time. 

THE BLOOD-VESSELS. 

We will now briefly refer to the blood-carrying mechan- 
ism, our object being to prove to our readers that the heart, 
arteries, and veins are simply different parts of the same 
machine, and that the contraction of a muscle, throwing a 
pressure on an artery or vein, will affect the heart, on the 
same principle that a force-pump attached to a rubber hose 
would be affected should you stand on the hose. 

The channels which carry the blood through the body 
form a closed system of elastic tubes, which may be divided 
into three varieties : Arteries, Capillaries, and Veins. 

Arteries. — The arteries are those vessels that carry the 
blood from the heart to the capillaries. The great trunk of 
the aorta springs from the left ventricle and gives off a series 
of branches, which in turn subdivide more and more freely in 
proportion to their distance from the heart. The aorta is 
divided into the arch, ascending and descending portions. 
The descending aorta is divided into two portions, the tho- 
racic and abdominal, in correspondence with the two great 
cavities of the trunk, in which it is situated. The thoracic 
aorta commences at the lower border of the fourth dorsal 
vertebra on the left side, and terminates at the aortic open- 




Cut 14. — The Heart, Lungs, and Great Vessels. 



HEART AND BLOOD-VESSELS. 109 

ing in the diaphragm, in front of the last dorsal vertebra. 
The abdominal aorta commences at the aortic opening in the 
diaphragm, in front of the body of the last dorsal vertebra, 
and, descending a little to the left of the vertebral column, 
terminates opposite the body of the fourth lumbar vertebra, 
where it divides into the right and left common iliac arteries. 
The common iliac arteries are about two inches in length, 
and divide opposite the intervertebral substance of the last 
lumbar vertebra and sacrum, into the internal and external 
iliac arteries, the latter supplying the lower extremities. 
The external iliac artery passes obliquely downward and 
outward along the inner border of the psoas muscle from the 
bifurcation of the common iliac arteries to Poupart's liga- 
ment, where it enters the thigh and becomes the femoral 
artery. The fem-oral artery commences immediately behind 
Poupart's ligament, midway between the anterior and supe- 
rior spine of the ilium and the symphysis pubis, and, passing 
down the front and inner part of the thigh, terminates at the 
opening of the adductor magnus muscle at the junction of 
the middle with the lower third of the thigh, where it 
becomes the popliteal artery. The popliteal artery com- 
mences at the termination of the femoral at the opening in 
the adductor magnus, and, passing obliquely downward and 
outward behind the knee-joint to the lower border of the 
popliteus muscle, divides into the anterior and posterior 
tibial arteries. The anterior tibial artery passes forward 
between the two heads of the tibialis posticus to the deep 
part of the front of the leg; then descends on the anterior 
surface of the interosseous membrane, gradually approach- 
ing the tibia, and at the lower part of the leg lies on the bone, 
and then on the anterior ligament of the ankle to the bend of 
the ankle-joint, where it lies more superficially and becomes 



110 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the dorsalis pedis. This artery passes forward from the- 
bend of the ankle along the tibial side of the foot, and ter- 
minates in two small branches, the dorsalis hallucis and com- 
municating. The posterior tibial artery is of large size, and 
passes obliquely downward from the lower border of the 
popliteus muscle along the tibial side of the leg to the fossa 
between the ankle and the heel, where it divides into the 
internal and external plantar arteries. 

Now, having traced this river of blood, which thrown 
branches to each organ and muscle in its course from the 
heart to its termination in the lower extremities, passing a& 
it does through, over, under, and between the numerous 
muscles on^its journey, it will not be hard for the intelligent 
reader to believe that an obstruction to its free flow, caused 
by contracted muscles, would affect the heart. Cramping of 
the muscles is so very common, often leaving the muscles 
in ridges, that the most skeptical will not dispute the fact 
that muscles will contract and remain in that condition. 
The heavy muscles of the thigh and those below and about 
the knee, from their peculiar relation to the artery and their 
great strength, are usually at fault, and by a simple twist 
of the leg, throwing these muscles on a strain, and thereby 
freeing the femoral artery, we have cured cases of heart 
disease that had baffled the best physicians of modern times. 

Having followed this river of blood from the heart to its 
termination, we must now trace it back to the heart and 
endeavor to locate along its channel the cause of dropsy and 
consequent heart trouble. The frequently b^'anching arter- 
ies finally terminate in the capillaries, in which distinct 
branches can no longer be recognized, but their channels are 
interwoven into a network, the meshes of which are made 
up of vessels all having the same caliber. They communi- 
cate with the capillary network of the neighboring arteries. 



HEART AXD BLOOD-VESSELS. ill 

SO that any giTen capillary area appears to be one continuous 
net of tubules connected liere and there with a similar net- 
work from distant arterioles, and thus any given capillary 
area may be fed with blood from several different sources. 

Veins. — The veins arise from the capillary network, com- 
mencing as radicles, which correspond to the ultimate dis- 
tribution of the arterioles, but they soon form wider and 
more numerous channels. They rapidly congregate together, 
making comparatively large vessels, which frequently inter- 
communicate and form coarse and irregular flexures. Thus 
it will be seen that we have two rivers, one distributing, the 
other gathering up and returning the blood to the heart. 
While a pressure on an artery, cutting off the supply to 
the extremities, causes them to be cold, at the same time 
affecting the heart, a pressure on a vein, stopping the return 
current, will necessitate an engorgement of the blood in the 
capillaries; the heart, working against heavy odds in trying 
to force the blood past the contracted muscles, will certainly 
be affected, while the stagnant blood, unable to escape, will 
cause either inflammatory rheumatism, dropsy, or erysipelas. 

expla:natory. 

In treating diseases of the heart, three great principles 
must be constantly kept in mind: 

(1) An ohstrnctlon, from any cause, to the free circulation 
of the blood overworks the heart, and in time must certainly 
affect that organ. This condition can be relieved by very 
careful and thorough manipulation of the muscles and by 
using the limbs, arms, and neck as levers to stretch any and 
all muscles to which they give attachment. 

In very many cases of organic heart trouble, in which 
we cannot hope to effect a cure, to free the circulation by 
manipulation relieves the pressure upon the heart to such 



112 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

an extent that the patient improves rapidly, and his life may 
be prolonged for years. 

(2) A contraction of the thorax or enlargement or mis- 
placement of any organ is very liable to affect the heart, in which 
case we must remove the cause, and the heart will be imme- 
diately relieved. 

We have very often cured a case of heart disease by a 
few applications of our Asthma treatment. We have cured 
others by relieving a severe case of dyspepsia; one, where 
the patient lay dying, with two M.D.'s at his bedside, by plac- 
ing the thumb of the right hand upon the angle of the fifth 
rib, and with the left drawing the left arm high and very 
strong above the head, pressing hard upon the angle of the 
rib as the arm was lowered with a backward motion. 

It is impossible to lay down a line of treatment that can 
be used successfully in all cases; so many complications are 
liable to exist that a great deal will depend upon the skill 
and good judgment of the operator, who should apply such 
treatment as, in his judgment, the condition indicates. 

There is a prevailing idea among the medical fraternity 
that in many cases of heart disease it is very dangerous 
to draw the arms high above the head. We consider this 
idea erroneous, if due caution is exercised in giving a very 
light treatment at first, gradualy increasing the strength 
employed, as the patient becomes accustomed to the 
manipulations. 

In treating osteopathically, for any disease, the treat- 
ment should be slow, gentle, and no stronger than the 
patient can stand without fatigue. 

(3) Thevaso-motor nerve-center (see heading), controlling 
as it does the caliber of the arteries, must he carefully studied 



HEART AND BLOOD-YESSELS. 113 

and never forgotten, in all cases that would indicate any com- 
plication of a nervous origin. 

"ENLARGEMENT OF THE HEART." 

CAUSE. 
Heart disease is often caused by constipation • and a 
diseased condition of the alimentary canal. Those cases can 
be readily distinguished, as the patient will find great 
difficulty in breathing when in a recumbent position, and 
upon resuming an upright position will feel immediate relief, 
thus proving that the organs are distended to such an extent 
that there is at all times a pressure on the diaphragm, left 
lung, and heart, and that their own weight, when in an 
upright position, will partially free the last named organs. 
It will be readily understood that our Constipation (page 
147 or Indigestion (page 156) treatment, or both, as the case 
may seem to require, will cure this form of heart disease as 
it has done in hundreds of cases. Other cases — and they 
are very numerous — are caused by a contraction of the mus- 
cles, depressing the ribs immediately over the heart, thus 
interfering with its action. M'e are led to believe that there 
are very few cases of actual ''enlargement of the heart,'' but 
that the so-called "enlargement of the heart" is really a com- 
pression of the cavity in which the heart is contained. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Free all the muscles attached to the ribs immedi- 
ately over the heart, from the spine to the median line, on 
each side, always moving the flesh upward, using the arm 
as a lever in treating the muscles of the spine (cut 7). 

2. Place the patient on the back; two operators, one 
grasping each wrist, placing the disengaged hands between 



114 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the patient's shoulders, the fingers pressing hard upon the 
angle of the rib betAveen the spine and scapula, draw the 
arms sIoavIj-, but with some strength, high above the head; 
move the hands down one inch, and repeat until you have 
reached the lower angle of the scapula. 

This will usually give instant relief, and seldom fails to 
effect a cure in from two to four weeks' treatment. A treat- 
ment should be given every other day. 

Of the many cases cured by us in this manner, it might 
be well to mention an old gentleman of Galena, Kansas. As 
a drowning man will grasp at a straw, when he was dying 
and nearly all hope had fled, we were called in, and, in the 
presence of two medical doctors and the members of his 
family, we raised his ribs, thus permitting the heart to act. 
In a few minutes we had our patient out of danger. We will 
also add that he never afterward experienced any difBculty 
with his heart. 

FEEBLE ACTION OF THE HEART. 

CAUSE. 

This trouble is caused by an almost imperceptible con- 
traction of all the muscles, thus interfering with the entire 
circulation. An aching, tired sensation, so often felt, is 
caused by the contracting muscles, as is readily proven 
beyond the shadow of a doubt by the fact that after a general 
treatment, stretching and moving all the muscles, permit- 
ting the sluggish blood to move more rapidly through the 
arteries and veins, the heart's action is increased and the 
tired, aching, worn sensation has entirely disappeared. 

TREATMENT TO EQUALIZE THE CIRCULATION. 

1. Place the patient on the side; using the arm as a 
lever (cut 7), with the fingers pressing rather hard close to 



HEART AXD BLOOD-TESSELS. 115 

the spine, beginning at the first cervical vertebra, move the 
muscles upward and outv^-ard gently but deep, the entire 
length of the spinal column. Treat the opposite side in a 
similar manner. 

In giving this treatment the operator should endeavor 
to avoid as much as possible using the ends of the fingers, 
but should place the hands flat, using the fingers as far back 
as the second phalanges, vs'hich will give the patient no pain, 
while the ends of the fingers are apt to go too deep, thus 
causing the patient unnecessary discomfort. 

Tender spots upon the ppine are very apt to be dis- 
covered; in which case a little additional treatment should 
be given in this immediate region, which will assist in reliev- 
ing the congested condition, possibly immediately over some 
nerve-center, which may control some distant part of the 
anatomy, and hence could not be expected to do its work cor- 
rectly with such a condition existing at its origin. 

2. Flex the limbs against the chest, the patient lying 
on the back; rotate the leg from side to side quite strongly 
two or three times, extending the limb with a light jerk (cuts 
32 and 36). Flex the limbs strongly against the chest, abduct- 
ing the knee and adducting the foot as the limb is extended. 
This treatment stretches the adductor muscles of the thigh, 
thereby freeing the femoral artery and vein and the long 
saphenous vein, and should never be omitted in any case 
where the patient is troubled with cold extremities. 

3. Grasp the thigh firmlv, with one hand on each side, 
the fingers meeting; beginning close to the body, move the 
flesh to the bone, if possible, from side to side (cut 29). 

This treatment is beneficial in all cases of impaired cir- 
culation of the limbs. 

4. Place the left hand under patient's right shoulder, 



116 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the fingers on the angle of the second rib; with the right hand 
grasp the patient's right wrist, drawing the arm slowly, with 
some strength, above the head as the patient inhales; press 
hard with the fingers upon the angle of the rib as the arm is 
lowered with a backward motion. Treat the third, fourth, 
and fifth ribs in a similar manner. This operation should 
be repeated on the opposite side. 

It is remarkable what a relief the patient will experience 
in alnaost all cases of heart disease if this treatment, which 
expands the chest and equalizes the circulation, is given in 
a correct and scientific manner. 

5. Place one hand under the chin, the other under 
the back of the head, and give gentle extension (cut 8), rotat- 
ing the head from side to side. In all cases where the action 
of the heart is too rapid, place one hand on each side of the 
neck, the fingers almost meeting over the spines of the four 
or five upper cervicals; press gently with the fingers for three 
or four minutes upon the vaso-motor center (see cut 13). A 
pressure at this point causes the arteries to relax, thus in- 
creasing their caliber and slowing the action of the heart. 

In all cases of heart disease or diseases of the blood, 
in addition to this treatment, such other treatment should 
be given as the condition for accompanying complications 
would indicate. 

In applying osteopathic treatment, the operator must 
determine with the utmost nicety just how strong or light 
a treatment will reduce the best results. Always begin 
with a very light treatment, which should increase in 
strength with each succeeding treatment until a point is 
reached beyond which we can go no further without unduly 
fatiguing the patient. If the treatment is correctly given, 



HEART AND BL00D-TE8SEL8. 117 

the patient should feel refreshed and relieved after each 
treatment. 

This treatment will require from fifteen to twenty min- 
utes, and in acute cases should be given each day ; in chronic 
diseases every other day is sufficient. 

Of the numerous cases cured by this treatment, we will 
mention that of an old gentleman of Galena, Kansas. He 
could not climb the steps to our office. We treated him on 
the counter in a grocery store near by. His pulse, which 
was hardly perceptible, was down to 38. AYhen he came for 
his second treatment, two days later, his pulse was strong 
and had increased to 58. He could hear better, and recog- 
nized people on the street for the first time in months. 



VALVULAR DISEASE OF THE HEART. 

(Structural changes in the valves, causing either obstruction 
or regurgitation at the orifices affected. Includes 
Valvulitis and Valvular Incompetency.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

As long as the heart muscle is sufficiently enlarged to 
compensate for the impaired circulation there are no sj'nip- 
toms; otherwise it may be distinguished by the appearance 
of Dilatation or Hypertrophy. 

TREATMENT. 

In this disease we do not hope to effect a cure. The 
patient can be often relieved and greatly beuefiited by a very 
careful application of Treatment to Equalize the Circulation 
(page 114). 



118 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CARDIAC DILATATION. 

(Expansion, usually more iH'ominent in the right heart.) 
SYMPTOMS. 
Irregular and rapid action of the heart; pulse weak; 
poor circulation; venous congestion; edema; syncope, — 
sudden faintness with loss of consciousness; — dyspnea. 

' TREATMENT. 

This disease can be greatly relieved, and the patient's 
life prolonged. See Treatment to Equalize the Circulation 
(page 114). 

" Treatment must be given in a gentle and very careful 
manner. 

CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY. 

(Abnormal enlargement of the heart.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Action of the heart rapid and regular; pulse full and 
strong; rush of blood to the head; shortness of breath; ver- 
tigo; ringing in the ears; insomnia; palpitation; and parox- 
ysmal cough. 

TREATMENT. 
Sometimes benefited by a Treatment to Equalize the 
Circulation (page 114). 

CARDIAC VERTIGO. 

(Dizziness, usually associated with cerebral anemia, and 
closely allied to fainting — also may be associated with 
fatty heart and dilatation of its right cavities.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Swimming sensation in the head ; darkness falls on the 
eyes ; patient becomes weak and chilly. 



HEART AXD BLOOD-VESSELS. 119 

TREATMENT. 

See Treatment to P^qualize the Circulation (page 114). 



CARDIAC MALFORMATION. 

(Abnormal structure or shape of the heart. Imperforated 
interventricular septum and a failure of the foramen 
ovale to close are the most common.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Cyanosis is the most common; patient seldom reaches 
adult life. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 



DEXTROCARDIA. 

(Congenital displacement of the heart on the right side.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Sound and impulse of the heart are on the right side 
instead of the left. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

TACHYCARDIA. 

(Abnormal rapidity of the heart's action.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Heart-beats rapid, accompanied with palpitation. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease is often benefited by thorough and very 
careful Treatment to Equalize the Circulation (page 114). 



120 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ANGINA PECTORIS. 
(Neuralgia of the heart. Breast-pang.) 
SYMPTOMS. 
Intense tearing and squeezing pain in the precordial 
region, extending to the shoulder and arm; irregular pulse; 
paroxysm; features drawn; apt to follow atrophy or fibroid 
degeneration suffocation in the breast. 
TREATMENT. 
Very thorough and careful Treatment to Equalize the 
Circulation, being careful to give No. 4 slowly, gently, but 
very thoroughly (page 114). 

ENDOCAEDITIS. 

(Inflammation of the endocardium.) 
SYMPTOMS. 
Heart action rapid; dyspnea; face flushed and counte- 
nance anxious; elevation of temperature; irritable stomach; 
slight cough; delirium; diarrhea. May accompany acute 
rheumatism. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Very thorough Treatment to Equalize the Circula- 
tion (page 114). 

2. Place the hand lightly over the heart and vibrate 
gently two minutes. See Vibration (pages 36 and 67). 

PERICARDITIS. 

(Inflammation of the pericardium.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Irregular and rapid action of the heart; pain in the pre- 
cordial region; elevation of temperature; dyspnea; nausea; 
and vomiting. 



HEART AXD BLOOD-VESSELS. 121 

TEEATMEXT. 

1. See Treatment to Equalize the Circulation (page 
114). 

2. Place the hand lightly over the heart and vibrate 
gently two minutes. See Vibration (pages 36 and 67). 

MYOCARDITIS. 
(Inflammation of the cardiac muscular tissue.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Somewhat similar to those of Endocarditis and Peri- 
carditis. Often occurs with rheumatism. 

TKEATMEXT. 

1. See Treatment to Equalize the Circulation (page 
114). 

2. Place the hand lightly over the heart and vibrate 
gently for two minutes. See Vibration (pages 36 and 67). 

HYDROPERICARDIUM. 

(Dropsy of the pericardium.) 

SY'MPTOMS. 

Similar to those of Pericarditis, without elevation of 
temperature; evidence of edema and pleural effusion; also 
signs of nephritis. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

CARDIAC THROMBOSIS. 

(Coagulation of the blood in the cavities of the heart.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Eapid action of the heart, feeble and irregular; surface 
of the body cold and livid; vomiting; syncope; delirium; 
venous turgidity; nervous excitement. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 



122 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

THOEACIC ANEURISM. 

(Rupture or dilatation of one or more of the coats of the 

thoracic aorta.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Irregular heart action; venous stagnation and edema; 
inability to swallow; localized perspiration; pulsating 
tumor; contraction or dilatation of one of the pupils. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease is sometimes benefited by a Treatment to 
Equalize the Circulation (page 114). 

. ARTERIO-CAPILLARY FIBROSIS. 

(Degeneration of the walls of the smaller blood-vessels.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Impairment of the nutrition and mental faculties ; numb- 
ness and coldness of the extremities; shortness of breath; 
impeded circulation; vertigo; and irregularity of heart 
action. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease is sometimes benefited, but never cured, 
by Osteopathy. See Treatment to Equalize the Circulation 
(page 114). 

CARDIAC FUNCTIONAL DISTURBANCE. 

(Deranged action of the heart without structural lesion. 
Due to impaired digestion and nutrition, resulting from 
dissipation, overwork, or excessive use of stimulants.) 

Sl^MPTOMS. 
Irregular action of the heart; palpitation; dyspnea; ver- 
tigo; and pain. Often develops into structural change. 



HEART AiTD BLOOD-VESSELS. 123 

TREATMENT. 

While in all organic diseases of the heart we cannot 
expect to give more than temporary relief, often succeeding, 
however, in prolonging the life of the patient for years; in 
all functional diseases we are very successful. 

It is always advisable to give the Treatment to Equalize 
the Circulation (page 114). This treatment not only frees the 
circulation, but expands the chest, thereby relieving the 
short, difficult breathing which often accompanies this 
disease. 

A great deal will depend upon the good judgment of the 
operator in treating these cases. So many different compli- 
cations are liable to arise, for which such treatment should 
be given as the judgment of the operator would indir-ate, 

VARICOSE VEINS, OR VARIX. 

(Morbid dilatation of the veins.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

The affected veins are dilated, tortuous, knotted, of a 

dull leaden or purplish blue color, with much discoloration of 

the parts and some swelling of the limb; if a great many 

small cutaneous veins are alone affected, they present the 

appearance of a close network; the enlarged veins and local 

swelling diminish after taking the horizontal position. 

CAUSE. 

Varicose veins are caused by a stoppage of the veins, 
usually by a pressure on the long saphenous or femoral vein. 

TREATMENT. 

Can be readily cured by stretching the muscles of the 
thigh and othermse treating the limbs as in Inflammatory 
Rheumatism, being very careful in handling the flesh below 
the knee. 



124 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

We will mention our first case of varicose veins to prove 
to our readers how easily this disease may be cured by view- 
ing the human system as a machine and the arteries and 
veins as rivers of blood, easily obstructed. The veins of the 
right limb below the knee were almost bursting, while the 
dead, stagnant blood in the capillaries formed sores, on 
which scales formed, occasionally dropping off, exposing the 
raw, bleeding surface beneath. Every known method had 
been tried and failed during the ten years he had suffered 
with this apparently incurable disease. The long saphenous 
vein, which empties into the femoral vein in the thigh, and 
whose branches gather and return the venous blood from the 
lower part of the leg, gorged, knotted, and distended as large 
as the little finger, could be traced to the obstruction, a con- 
tracted muscle in the thigh. It almost seems incredible 
that, where its cause was so apparent, for years the medical 
fraternity would work on the effect, encasing the limb in a 
rubber stocking to strengthen the bursting veins, while 
throwing medicine into the river above, with some object 
in view, unknown to the writer and possibly equally unknown 
to themselves. We gave the gentleman four treatments, 
stretching and freeing all the muscles of the thigh and start- 
ing the blood up the long saphenous vein. His limb immedi- 
ately became easier. At this time we were called to southern 
Kansas, and after a year, when we had almost forgotten 
the incident, we met our old friend in a small Missouri town, 
entirely recovered. 

PHLEBITIS. 

(Inflammation of a vein, which may be caused by trauma- 
tism, thrombosis, or gout.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Similar to those of Thrombosis, with a dusky red line in 
the course of the vein. 



HEART AND BLOOD-VESSELS. 125 

TEEATMENT. 

Sucli treatment should be given as will free the circula- 
tion through and from the affected area. 

ANASARCA, OR GENERAL DROPSY. 
(An abnormal accumulation of serum in some serous cavity 

of the body, or a diffusion of such fluid through the 

cellular tissue.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

It is of two distinct varieties, for, besides its occurrence 
in the meshes of the loose tissue beneath the skin, it may take 
place as a local dropsy in any of the natural cavities or sacs 
of the body, and is named according to the parts involved. 

Partial dropsy is always due to excessive venous reple- 
tion, and this overdistension of the small veins is the result 
of some mechanical impediment to the venous circulation. 
Dropsy due to obstructed portal circulation may be recog- 
nized by the following clinical characters: It begins in the 
abdomen; difficult breathing follows, but does not precede 
the ascites. There is a tendency to vomiting, diarrhea, and 
piles; further, the spleen becomes enlarged and there are 
varicose veins on the right side of the abdomen. 

Dropsy at first partial, but afterwards becoming general, 
commences in the feet and extends upward, and this is also 
due to excessive venous repletion from obstructed venous 
circulation. 

Dropsical swellings are soft, inelastic, diffused, and 
leave, for some time, the indentation made by the pressure 
of a finger. In chronic cases and when the swelling is very 
great the skin becomes smooth, glassy, and of a dull red or 
purple color; and where the skin is less elastic it becomes 
livid or blackish and troublesome, even gangrenous, or 
sloughs may form. 

—9— 



126 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TEEATMENT. 

In treating dropsy, of whatever organ, it is necessary to 
nse sncli remedies as will act on the kidneys and skin and 
excite tliem to increased activity; the result of this activity 
is to diminish the fluids which have collected in one or 
another part of the body and remain there unabsorbed, and 
cause them to be taken up by the kidneys or thrown off by 
the skin, and thus carried out of the system through the 
natural outlets. Any remedy that accomplishes this object 
effectively cures dropsy occuring in iinj part of the body. 

1. Place the patient on the side; and move all the mus- 
cles of the spine very deep from the tenth dorsal to the last 
sacral vertebra. This will excite the nerves which control 
the kidneys to renewed action, thereby enabling them to sep- 
arate the immense amount of water about to be poured into 
them from the blood. 

2. Give Treatment to Equalize the Circulation (page 
114), being very careful to stretch all the muscles near the 
affected parts. 

In a very short time, usually from two to six days, the 
kidneys will begin to act very freely, throwing off the 
decomposed and watery particles of blood, while in from six 
to twelve weeks the patient will be entirely well. 

Of numerous cases of dropsy cured by us we will men- 
tino that of a lady of Joplin, Missiouri, whose case had not 
only been treated by the best physicians of her own city, 
but those of Kansas City and St. Louis. She came to us in 
a hopeless condition; her abdomen, limbs, and feet were 
swollen to more than twice their normal size. After the 
second treatment, she began to improve rapidly, and in ten 
days her ankles could be spanned by the thumb and fingers; 
in one month the dropsy had entirely disappeared. She 



HEART AND BLOOD-VESSELS. 127 

gained strength rapidly, and in a short time had entirely 
regained her health. 

Another remarkable case was that of an old gentleman 
of Baxter Springs, Kansas, who had been for five years 
gradually losing the use of his lower limbs, and during the 
last year dropsy had made its appearance. After the second 
treatment, the dropsy had almost entirely disappeared; 
his limbs regained their long-lost strength, and he would 
leap about the office like a boy in an ecstacy of delight, 
kicking higher than the doctor's head and springing from the 
floor to our operating-table with apparent ease. 



128 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 



Diseases of the Blood. 



ANEMIA. 
(Deficiency of blood and red corpuscles.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Weak heart; palpitation; vertigo; neuralgia; insom- 
nia; imp'aired appetite and digestion; eyeballs of a bluish 
tint; countenance pale; urine pale. 

TREATMENT. 

Very thorough Treatment to Equalize the Circulation 
(page 114). Particular stress should be placed upon No. 1, 
being very thorough in the cervical and upper dorsal region, 
as it is here that we reach the nerves which control the assim- 
ilation. It is also advisable to give vibrations over the spLen, 
one of the sources of origin of the corpuscles. 

Treatment should be given every other day, fifteen 
minutes. Improvement should be noticed after the first 
week, and a cure in from six to twelve weeks. 

CHLOROSIS, OR GREEN SICKNESS. 
(A form of anemia in young girls, occurring about puberty.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Complexion of a yellowish-green hue; languor; weari- 
ness; neuralgia; pearly eyes; amenorrhea; and palpitation. 



LYMPHATIC SYSTEM. 129 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Treatment to Equalize the Circulation (page 
114). This treatment should be given in a very thorough, 
careful manner. 

2. See Amenorrhea 

Treatment should be given every other day. Immediate 
benefit can be expected, and a cure effected in from two to 
three months. 

THE LYMPHATIC CIRCULATION. 

There exists generally within the tissues of the body a 
system of vessels, or channels, which contain the juices of the 
tissues, and within these vessels a fluid is always moving in a 
centripetal direction. These channels within the tissues 
arise in a variety of ways, uniting to form delicate and, 
afterward, thicker tubes in their course, which dually termi- 
nate in two large trunks which open at the junction of the 
jugular and subclavian veins. That on the right side is the 
right lymphatic trunk, and that on the left is the thoracic 
duct. This fluid is called the lymph, permeating every tissue 
in the body, bathing their constituent elements, supplying 
them with nutriment, and enabling them to dispose of the 
waste products resulting from their metabolism. 

The lymph is collected and returned to the blood in 
special tubes, the lymphatics. They communicate freely 
with each other, at first forming thin-walled, microscopic 
lymphatic vessels, and by their confluence forming the lym- 
phatic veins, which usually accompany the superficial and 
deep blood-vessels. 

The larger lymphatics are provided with valves which 
open towards the heart. The walls are so thin and translu- 
cent that often the clear lymph which they contain may be 
seen. 



130 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

The general function of the lymphatics is to collect the 
fluid that saturates the tissues and convey it back to the 
blood. 

The capillary blood system may be regarded as a system 
of irrigation which supplies the tissues with nutrient fluid, 
while the lymphatic may be regarded as a drainage appa- 
ratus, conveying away the fluids that have passed through 
the capillary walls. The lymphatic represents an appendix 
to the blood-vascular system. A careful study of these con- 
ditions shows that there can be no lymphatic system when 
the blood-stream is completely arrested. 

The lymphatic glands are incorrectly named, as they are 
merely many-branched lacunar labyrinthine spaces composed 
of adenoid tissue, intercalated in the course of the lymphatic 
vessels. The simple lymph-glands, or lymph-follicles, are 
small rounded bodies about the size of a pin-head. 

The compound lymphatic glands are a collection of 
lymph-follicles, and are small oval or kidney-shaped bodies, 
varying much in size. 

Lymph-glands not only form leucocytes, but in them, 
also, cells break down, and the products of their disintegra- 
tion are taken up by the leucocytes and further changed by 
them. 

It is estimated that the total amount of lymph and chyle 
passing through the large vessels in twenty-four hours is 
equal to the amount of blood; it will, therefore, be readily 
understood that a free and uninterrupted circulation of 
the fluids of the body is essential to a condition of perfect 
health. 



THE LYMPHATIC SYSTEM. 131 



Diseases of the Lymphatic System. 



LEUCOCYTHEMIA, LEUKEMIA, OR WHITE BLOOD. 

(Abnormal increase in the number of white corpuscles, with 

glandular enlargement.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Enlargement of the spleen, liver, and lymphatic glands; 
dyspnea; diarrhea; edema; epistaxis; and febrile periods. 
More common in men than in women. ' 

TREATMENT. 

In the treatment of this disease, in addition to the 
Treatment to Equalize the Circulation (page 114), particular 
attention should be given to freeing the lymphatic circula- 
tion in the immediate vicinity of the enlarged glands. 
Manipulate the lymphatic glands carefully and thoroughly, 
rolling them between the finger and thumb, also work under 
them as deeply as possible. Place the hand lightly over the 
liver, if enlarged, and vibrate gently for three minutes. See 
Vibration (pages 36 and 67). Treat in a similar manner any 
other gland which may be enlarged. See Lymphadenoma 
(page 132). 

Check the diarrhea by placing the knee in the back 
just below the last dorsal, and drawing the patient back- 
ward, pressing hard with the knee; hold a moment in this 
position. Place the hand over the bowels and vibrate gently 
for one or two minutes. 



132 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

LYMPHADENOMA, HODGKIN'S DISEASE, OR PSETJDO- 
lEUKEMIA. 

(Enlargement of the lymphatic glands and outer adenoid 
tissues, with diminution of red corpuscles and hemo- 
globin.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Cervical glands usually first involved. Weakness; 
pallor; anorexia, loss of appetite; pyrexia, paroxysm of fever; 
spleen not so much enlarged as in Leucocythemia. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Thorough Treatment to Equalize the Circulation 
(page 114). Be very thorough and careful in cervical region 
to work as deep and strong as patient can conveniently stand. 

2. Manipulate each of the enlarged lymphatic glands, 
rolling them beneath the fingers, working under them as 
much as possible. 

3. Place the tips of the fingers upon the enlarged 
glands, vibrating hard and strong. See Vibration (pages 
3G and 67). 

It is remarkable how soon, if this treatment is given in a 
thorough, careful manner, the patient will show signs of 
recovery. 

Treatment should be given every other day, and should 
occupy about fifteen or twenty minutes. 

THE STOMACH. 

The stomach is a sac-like, pear-shaped dilatation of the 
alimentary canal, between the esophagus and beginning of 
the small intestine. Its large end is directed above and to 
the left, to the diaphragm; its small end, below and to the 
right. 



TEE STOMACH. 133 

The mouth of the stomach is the cardiac opening, which 
passes from the esophagus like an inverted funnel without 
visible external limit. On the inner surface a definite line 
is seen between the esophagus and cardia; above the line 
the mucous membrane is whitish and made largely of pave- 
ment epithelium, while below^ the color is red and the 
mucous membrane shows characteristic cylindrical epi- 
thelium. Sometimes an external ring, as' well as an internal 
projection, is found between the cardia and the rest of the 
stomach, forming a kind of antrum cardiacum. 

Passing from the cardia to the left and above, we find the 
first great pouch, blind sac, or fundus, whose relative size 
varies with age. In early youth it is slightly developed; in 
the adult man it forms one-fifth of the stomach. 

This continues on the right into the body of the stomach, 
which has two surfaces, anterior and posterior, and two 
borders. 

At the right the body of the stomach gradually contracts 
towards its duodenal end. 

The division between the stomach and intestine is 
marked externally by a circular constriction, sulcus pj/loricus, 
and more deeply by a muscular ring, sphincter pylorlcus, and 
internally by a corresponding projection of mucous mem- 
brane called valvula pylorica, or pylorus. 

The valve usually presents a round opening, the 
oriflcium duodenale, w^hich may have a central or ec.'centric 
position. It may not be an enclosing ring, but a crescentic 
projection, and rarely consists of two halves lying opposite 
each other. 

The size of the stomach varies, according to age, sex, 
individual, and the degree of distension. A woman's stom- 



134 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

acli increases more in length, is more slender, and is gener- 
ally smaller than that of a man. 

The stomach lies in the epigastric region and left hypo- 
chondrium, slightly in the right hypochondrium, about five 
sixths to the left of the median line, and one-sixth to the 
right. Of the left segment, the greater part lies in the left 
hypochondrium — ^viz.,the cardia, fundus, and the most curved 
part of the body. The rest of the body and a part of the pars 
pylorica fall in the left part of the epigastrium. The only 
part belonging to the right half includes a very small portion 
of the pars pylorica and the pylorus. The stomach lies under 
the diaphragm and liver, above the jejunum, ileum, and 
transverse colon, extending its greater part into the left 
hypochondrium, and its smaller part into the epigastrium, 
between the spleen on the left and the gall-bladder on the 
right. It does not lie transversely, unless in the infant, or in 
the female deformed by corsets. It is directed from above 
and the left downward and forward to the right. An empty 
stomach may hang nearly vertically, and present an anterior 
and posterior surface, but there is usually some obliquity. 
If the small intestines are much distended, it may be trans- 
verse, or, if rigor mortis be rapid, it may be cylindrical, 
especially below. 

Movements of the Stomach. — When the stomach is empty, 
the great curvature is directed downward, and the lesser 
upward ; but when the organ is f^Ul. it rotates on an axis run- 
ning horizontally through the pylorus and cardia, so that 
the great curvature appears to be directed to the front, and 
the lesser backward. 

The movements of the stomach are of two kinds: One 
is the rotary or churning movement, whereby the parts of the 
walls of the stomach in contact with the contents glide to 



THE STOMACH 135 

and fro with a slow rubbing movement. Such movement 
seems to occur periodically, every period lasting several min- 
utes. By these movements the contents are moistened with 
the gastric juice, while the masses of food are partially 
broken up. (The formation of hair-balls in the stomachs of 
dogs and cattle indicates that such rotary movements of the 
contents of the stomach take place.) 

The other kind of movement consists in a periodically 
occuring peristalsis, whereby, as with a push, the first dis- 
solved portion of the contents of the stomach is forced into 
the duodenum, beginning after a quarter of an hour, and 
recurring until about five hours after a meal. This peristal- 
sis is most pronounced towards the pyloric end, and the mus- 
cles of the pyloric sphincter relax to allow the contents to 
pass into the duodenum. The longitudinal muscular fibers, 
when they contract, especially when the pyloric end is filled, 
may act so as to dilate the pylorus. 

The Nerves of the Stomach. — The stomach is supplied by 
nerve-fibers from the two vagi and the solar plexus. After 
forming the esophageal plexus, the left vagus descends 
rather anterior to, and the right posterior to, the esophagus. 
along which they continue to the stomach. The left supplies 
chiefly the lesser curvature and the anterior surface of the 
organ, together with branches to the liver and the duodenum. 
The right gives branches to the posterior surface of the 
stomach, about two-thirds of its fibers passing to the solar 
plexus. 

From the solar or celiac plexus branches, composed 
chiefly of non-medullated fibers, constitute the gastric plexus 
of the splanchnic nerves along the gastric artery to the stom- 
ach, while they intermingle with the branches from the vagi 
under the peritoneal covering. Small ganglia exist in the 



136 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

course of these nerves. Branches penetrate the coats of the 
stomach, along with the arteries and between the longitudi- 
nal and circular muscular coats. 

Nerve-Influence on the Stomach. — Auerbach's ganglionic 
plexus of nerve-fibers and cells, which lie between the muscu- 
lar coats of the stomach, must be regarded as its proper 
motor center, and to it motor impulses are conducted by the 
vagi. Section of both vagi does not abolish, but diminishes 
the movements of the stomach. The muscular fibers of the 
cardia may be excited to action, or their action inhibited, by 
fibers which run to the vagus. If the vagi be divided in the 
neck, theri? is a short temporary spasmodic contraction of the 
cardiac aperture. On stimulating the peripheral end of the 
^agus with electricity, after a latent period of a few seconds, 
The cardiac end contracts, more especially if the stomach is 
distended, but the movements are slight if the stomach be 
empty. Stimulation of the vagi in the neck causes contrac- 
tion of the pylorus, when the latent period may be several 
seconds. Stimulation of the splanchnics in the thorax 
arrests the spontaneous pyloric contractions, the left splanch- 
nic being more active than the right. 

In the cardia are automatic gangliotic cells, which are 
connected with the vagus and sympathetic. The efferent 
channel for impulses seems to be through the vagi, and 
partly through the splanchnics. The center for the opening 
of the cardia lies in the anterior inferior end of the corpus 
striatum, and the conducting paths in the vagi. The cardia 
may be opened reflexly by stimulation of the sensory abdomi- 
nal nerves of the kidney, uterus, or intestine. 

The body of the stomach also possesses a few automatic 
ganglia in connection with the vagi and sympathetic. A 
center for its contraction lies in the corpora quadrigemina, 



THE STOMACH. 137 

and the efferent paths lie in the vagi, but chiefly in the spinal 
cord, and from the latter into the sympathetic. Inhibitory 
centers lie in the upper part of the spinal cord, and the effer- 
ent paths are in the splauchnics. 

The pylorus also contains automatic centers. The cen- 
ter for opening the cardia also inhibits the movements of the 
pylorus, the path being through the cord and splanchnic. 
Inhibitory pyloric centers lie in the corpora quadrigemina 
and olives; the paths are in the spinal cord. The centers in 
the cortex for opening the cardia at the same time contract 
the pylorus. The contraction centers for the pylorus lie in 
the corpora quadrigemina. 

VOMITING. 

Vomiting is caused by contraction of the walls of the 
stomach, the pyloric sphincter being closed. It occurs more 
readily when the stomach is distended. Dogs usually 
greatly distend the stomach by swallowing air before they 
vomit. It readily occurs in infants, in whom the cul-de-sac at 
the cardia is not developed. It is quite certain that in chil- 
dren vomiting occurs through contraction of the walls of the 
stomach, without the spasmodic action of the abdominal 
walls. When vomiting is violent, the abdominal muscles act 
energetically. Vomiting is generally preceded by a feeling 
of nausea, and usually there is a rush of saliva to the mouth, 
caused by a reflex stimulation of the afferent fibers in the 
gastric branches of the vagus; the efferent nerve for the 
secretion of saliva being the corda tympani. After this, a 
deep inspiration is taken and the glottis closed, and a violent 
expiratory effort is made, so that the contraction of the 
abdominal muscles acts upon the contents of the abdomen, 
the stomach being forcibly compressed. The cardiac orifice 



138 ■ OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

is open at the same instant, and the contents of the stomach 
are ejected. 

The center for the movements concerned in vomiting 
lies in the medulla oblongata, and is in relation with the 
respiratory center, as is shown by the fact that nausea may 
be overcome by rapid and deep respiration. 

In vomiting, the afferent impulses may be discharged 
from the mucous membrane of the soft palate, pharnyx, 
root of the tongue — glosso-pharyngeal nerve — as in tickling 
the fauces with the finger ; the nerves of the stomach — vagus 
and sympathetic — stimulation of the uterine nerves; the 
mesenteric nerves; nerves of the urinary apparatus; nerves 
to the liver and gall-duct; and nerves to the lungs — vagus. 
Vomiting is also produced by direct stimulation of the vomit- 
ing centers. The efferent impulses are carried by the phrenics 
to the diaphragm; by the vagus to the esophagus and stom- 
ach; and by the intercostal nerves to the abdominal muscles. 

Vomiting produced by the thought of something dis- 
agreeable appears to be caused by the conduction of the 
excitement from the cerebrum to the vomiting center. It 
may also be excited through the brain by a disagreeable 
smell, a shocking sight, or by other impressions on the nerves 
of special sense. Vomiting is very common in diseases of 
the brain. 

THE INTESTINES. 

The intestinal canal is in the form of a curved tube, pass- 
ing uninterruptedly from the pylorus to the anus. Its length 
is about six times the height of its possessor, though in the 
adult it may be independent of the age, weight, or height. 
A^egetarians may have a longer intestine than those living 
on a mixed or flesh diet. This canal is divided into the Small 



THE INTESTINES. 139 

Intestine, the upper four-fifths; and the lower one-fifth, the 
Large Intestine. 

Small Intestine. — This is that part of the alimentary 
canal extending from the pylorus to the ileo-cecal valve. Its 
average length is about 22 feet, the extremes being 34 feet 
and S feet. Its circumference decreases from the stomach 
towards the large intestine. The small intestine is divided 
into three parts, the Duodenum, the Jejunum, and the Ileum.. 
The wall of the ileum is so thin and translucent that a news- 
paper may be read through it. 

Large Intestine.— The large intestine extends from the 
Termination of the ileum to the anal orifice, differing from the 
small intestine in its larger size, more fixed position, sacular 
form, and appendices epiploicse. It is about 5 or G feet in 
length. Its circumference decreases from beginning to end, 
except at the ampulla of the rectum. In its course the large 
intestine describes a horseshoe-shapedarch, which surrounds 
the convolutions of the small intestine. It begins in a blind 
sac in the right iliac fossa, ascends along the right posterior 
abdominal wall to the right hypochondrium, where it is con- 
nected with the under surface of the liver. It here bends 
to the left, and takes a transverse, somewhat ascending, 
course to the spleen. In the left hypochondrium it bends 
again, and descends along the left posterior abdominal wall 
to the left iliac fossa, then becomes convoluted, as the sig- 
moid flexure. It enters the pelvis, and descends as the rec- 
tum, along its posterior wall to the anus. It is divided 
into the Cecum, Ascending Colon, Hepatic Flexure. Transverse 
Colon, Splenic Flexure, Descending Colon. Sigmoid Flexure, 
and Rectum. 

Movements of the Intestines, Peristalsis. — The best ex- 
ample of peristaltic movements is afforded by the small 



140 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

intestine; the progressive narrowing of the tube pro- 
ceeds from above downward, thus propelling the con- 
tents before it. Frequently, after death, or when air acts 
freely upon the gut, the peristalsis develops at various parts 
of the intestine simultaneously, whereby the loops of the 
intestine present the appearance of a heap of worms creeping 
among each other. The advance of new intestinal contents 
again increases the movement. In the large intestine the 
movement is more sluggish, and less extensive. Peristaltic 
movement may be seen and felt when the abdominal walls 
are very thin, and also in hernial sacs. They are more lively 
in vegetable feeders than in carnivorous. The movements 
of the stomach and intestines cease during sleep. 

Nerve-Influence on the Intestines. — ^Stimulation of the 
vagus increases the movements of the small intestine, 
either by conducting impressions to the plexus mesentericus, 
or by causing contraction of the stomach, which stimu- 
lates the intestine in a purely mechanical manner. The 
splanchnic is the inhibitory nerve of the small intestine 
only as long as the circulation in the intestinal blood- 
vessels is undisturbed and the blood in the capillaries does 
not become venons. When the latter condition occurs, 
stimulation of the splanchnic increases the peristalsis. If 
arterial blood be freely supplied, the inhibitory action con- 
tinues for some time. Stimulation of the origin of the 
splanchnics of the spinal cord in the dorsal region, under 
the same conditions, and even when general tetanus has been 
produced by the administration of strychnine, causes an 
inhibitory effect. 

It is believed that the splanchnic contains, besides the 
inhibitory fibers, which are easily exhausted by a venous 
condition of the blood, motor fibers, which remain excitable 



THE IXTESTIXES. 143 

for a longer time, because, after death, stiniulation of tlie 
splancbnics always causes peristalsis, the same as stimula- 
tion of the vagus. It is the yaso-motor nerve of the intes- 
tinal blood-vessels, governing the largest vascular area in 
the body. When it is stimulated, all the vessels of the intes- 
tine, which contain muscular fibers in their walls, contract; 
when it is divided, they dilate. In the latter case a large 
amount of blood accumulates within the blood-vessels of the 
abdomen, so that there is aneihia of the other parts of the 
body, which may be so great as to cause death, owing to the 
deficiency of blood in the medulla oblongata. 

Effect of Nerves on the Rectum. — The nervi erigentes, 
when stimulated, causes the longitudinal muscular fibers 
of the rectum to contract, while the circular muscular 
fibers are supplied by the hypogastric nerves. Stimu- 
lation of the hypogastric also exerts an inhibitory effect 
on the longitudinal muscles. Stimulation of the nervi eri- 
gentes inhibits not only the spontaneous movements of the 
circular fibers of the rectum, but also those movements ex- 
cited by stimulation of the hypogastric nerves. 

Excretion of Fecal Matter. — The contents of the small 
intestine remain in it about three hours, and about twelve 
hours in the large intestine, where they become less 
watery, and assume the character of feces. The feces 
are gradually carried along with the peristaltic move- 
ment until they reach a point a little above that part 
of the rectum which is surrounded by both sphincter muscles. 

Immediately after the expulsion of the feces, the exter- 
nal sphincter usually contracts vigorously and remains so 
for some time: afterwards it relaxes, when the elasticity of 
the part surrounding the anal opening, particularly the two 
sphincters, sufiices to keep the anus closed. In the interval 



144 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

between two evacuations there does not seem to be a continu- 
ous tonic contraction of the sphincter. As long as the feces 
lie above the rectum, they do not excite any conscious sen- 
sation. The sensation of requiring to go to stool occurs when 
the feces pass into the rectum; at the same instant the stimu- 
lation of the sensory nerves of the rectum causes a reflex 
excitement of the sphincter. The center for these move- 
ments lies in the lumbar region of the spinal cord. 

EXPLANATORY. 

Our object in entering thus briefly into the anatomy . 
of the above named organs is to prove to our readers by such 
standard .works as Gray and Landois the intimate relation 
existing between the alimentary canal and the nervous sys- 
tem. We will endeavor to prove to the satisfaction of the 
most skeptical that the human system is a machine governed 
by the great dynamo, the brain, reinforced and assisted by 
numerous nerve-centers; that an obstruction of undue pres- 
sure upon any nerve or nerve-center, from any cause, breaks 
the circuit, and causes partial or complete paralysis of the 
part controlled by the nerve involved, and consequent dis- 
ease. We also expect to prove that irritation, or undue 
stimulation from any cause, to the brain, nerve-centers, or 
any nerve, has the opposite effect, and consequent disease in 
a different form. 

If the osteopath, by a thorough knowledge of anatomy 
and physiology, can remove the cause by skillful manipula- 
tion, tTius equalizing the forces, health will be the inevitable 
result in all cases where the disease has not reached a stage 
in which the tissues are hopelessly destroyed. This last 
proposition all unprejudiced, fair-minded physicians will 
admit. 



STOMACH AND INTESTINES. 145 

While we canuot agree with the discoverer of Osteopa- 
thy, that in all cases of constipation a rih is dislocated, press- 
ing upon the splanchnic nerve, and thereby causing consti- 
pation and kindred troubles, we believe there are instances 
where such is the case, and that by reducing the dislocation 
we turn on the current from the brain, thereby starting the 
peristaltic action of the bowels, which immediately move. 

It is always advisable, in examining the patient, to first 
satisfy yourself that the framework is in line, as very many 
diseases have been traced to a partial or complete disloca- 
tion, obstructing the nerve-wave or blood-supply, perhaps, 
to a distant part; and a speedy cure effected by reducing the 
dislocation. 

It has been our experience that the muscles are usually 
at fault, and we believe that Dr. Still and his associates, in 
a vain attempt to reduce an imaginary dislocation, accident- 
ally stretch the right muscles, thereby freeing the obstructed 
nerve-wave or blood-sujjply. 

It is always well, in endeavoring to ascertain the cause 
of any disease of the thorax or ahdomen, (1) to place the 
patient upon the face, and carefully examine the spine and 
ribs for dislocations; (2) beginning at the atlas, with one 
finger on each side of the spine, move the hand downward^ 
slowly and gently. If careful, we are very apt to discover, 
upon one or possibly both sides of the spine, an irregularity 
in the temperature, which must be equalized by a skillful 
manipulation, if we hope to obtain satisfactory results; 
(3) once more beginning at the cervicals,and moving the hand 
down the spine in a similar manner, working more deeply, 
we are very liable to discover contraction of the muscles, 
which may be detected by their hard, cord-like, knotty condi- 
tion. By referring to cut 15, and carefully inspecting it, the 
reader will begin to realize how utterly impossible it would 



146 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

be for the brain to control the various organs of the body, 
unless the muscles which surround and assist in protecting 
this delicate piece of mechanism — the nervous system — ^are 
in a perfect and normal condition ; one had as well expect an 
uninterrupted telephone service immediately after a cyclone, 
when the wires are crossed, broken, and covered with fallen 
timbers. By a thorough understanding of anatomy, the 
osteopath is enabled to so manipulate the muscles at fault 
as to restore harmony of action. 

It would be impossible to lay down a set of manipula- 
tions that could be correctly applied in all the complications 
arising in various cases. A great deal must depend upon the 
good judgment of the operator. Anyone at all familiar with 
anatomy and physiology may hope to attain very gratify- 
ing results in almost all diseases of the stomach and intestines 
by keeping in mind the fact that we must not only have 
a free and uninterupted circulation of blood, but must 
have a free and uninterrupted circuit of nerve- wave between 
the brain and each muscle and organ of the system. 

Take, for instance, the solar plexus, or "Great Abdominal 
Brain," formed by the pneumogastric and splanchnic nerves ; 
is it not reasonable to suppose that any obstruction or press- 
ure upon either of these nerves, breaking the circuit with the 
brain, would cause constipation or torpid liver, or that an 
undue stimulation or irritation might cause diarrhea or 
bloody flux? Is it not equally reasonable to suppose that 
to remove the cause in the same common-sense and method- 
ical manner in which the telephone company adjusts its 
wire would cure the disease? 

After locating the cause of the trouble, the operator will 
have the best success who applies the manipulation, or com- 
bination of manipulations, which seems best adapted to the 
case in question. 



STOMACH, IXTE8TINE8, AND PEEITONEUM. 147 



Diseases of the Stomach, Intestines, and 
Peritoneum. 



CONSTIPATION. 

(Sluggish action of the bowels.) 

EXPLANATORY. 

While we admit that constipation is not desirable, and 
may almost invariably be avoided, yet persons thus predis- 
posed are generally long-lived, unless they commit suicide 
by purgative medicines, while those who are subject to 
frequent attacks of diarrhea are soon debilitated. A daily 
action of the bowels is no doubt desirable in most cases, but 
by no means invariably so. An evacuation may take place 
daily, or every second day, or even every third day, in per- 
sons who are equally healthy. There is no invariable rule 
applying to all persons. Purgation produced by drugs is 
an unnatural condition, and although temporary relief often 
follows the use of aperients, they tend to disorganize, the 
parts on which their force is chieflj^ expended. The intes- 
tinal canal is not a smooth, hard tube, through which can be 
forced whatever it contains without injury; it is part of a 
living organism, and needs no force to propel its contents on 
their way; nor can such force be applied with impunity. Not 
only does the frequent use of purgatives overstimulate the 
liver and pancreas, but also ajid especially the numerous 
secretory glands which cover the extensive surface of the 
intestinal canal, forcing them to pour out their contents in 
such excessive quantities as to weaken and impair their 



148 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

functions, produceing a state of general debility, and thus 
suspending the normal action of the stomach and intestinal 
canal. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Nausea, vomiting, griping, and even fainting, are 
produced; the brain and vital energies are disturbed, occa- 
sioning lowness of spirits and melancholy, alternating with 
mental excitement and peculiar irritability of temper. 

CAUSE. 

We will now endeavor to prove to the satisfaction of 
our readers that, viewing man as a machine, constipation 
can be traced to its true cause, and cured by an application 
of the never-failing principles of Osteopathy. The digestive 
organs in constipation may be compared to an electric car 
with the current partially cut off; with a light load it might 
possibly work in a feeble, halting manner, while the slender 
wire transmits the power to move the heavy car. The 
dynamo generates that power; break the connection, and the 
car stops. So in the human being; the brain is the great 
generator, the center of all power. Stop for one instant 
the current on these slender nerves, and the heavy muscles 
of the giant are weaker than those of a tiny child. There 
is one peculiarity about the nerves which is liable to lead 
one astray, and that is the fact that a pressure on the main 
trunk of a nerve causes no pain at that point, but at the 
extremity of the nerve. 

In constipation we find the intercostal and spinal mus- 
cles contracted from the fifth dorsal vertebra and fifth rib 
to the eighth. The sixth or seventh rib may be turned 
slightly, and either the muscles or rib pressing on the 
splanchnic nerves (which, with the pueumogastric, control 
the digestive organs), thus depriving the intestines of half 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 149 

their motor power. Taking physic for constipation is like 
whipping a weak, half-starved horse. He will go just as 
long as jou continue to apply the whip, but is left in a more 
enfeebled condition after each application of the lash. 
Would it not be more human and sensible to increase his 
feed and reduce his load, as we now propose doing with the 
splanchnic nerve? 

By relaxing the contracted muscles we not only allow 
the ribs to spring back, thus releasing the nerve, but also 
permit the blood to pass down and supply the nerve with 
food, and in a comparativel\" short time it will be able to 
once more convey the current that will start the peristaltic 
action of the bowels, and also furnish a motor power to the 
sluggish liver and pancreas, enabling these organs to resume 
their work. As an obstruction to the nerve-force of the 
splanchnic system not only weakens the peristaltic action 
of the bowels, but also the action of the liver: that great 
chemical laboratory, placed on the highway by which the 
great majority of material absorbed from the intestines 
reaches the blood, it is obviously in a position to act as the 
guardian of the blood's purity and health. It certainly in 
some respects performs this duty, for many poisons, when 
introduced into the digestive tract, are stopped by the liver, 
and, if their amount be not excessive, are eliminated with the 
bile. But we have reason to believe that this enormous 
mass of protoplasm is placed in this peculiar position in the 
circulation to preside over much more important duties than 
that of a mere gatekeeper. Many if not all of the absorbed 
materials are found to be altered during their visit to the 
liver. In fact, we must regard this organ as the great 
chemical laboratory of the blood, where many important 
analyses are made. It has an immense double blood-supply; 
it receives all the blood of the portal veins coming from the 



150 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

digestive tract and spleen. This supply of blood varies 
much in amount; after meals, it equals one-fourth of all the 
blood in the bod3'. Among the many important functions 
of the liver are the formation of the urea and uric acid and 
the secretion of the bile. Its failure to supply in sufficient 
quantities the latter (which is mixed in the abdomen with 
the pancreatic juice, to assist in digesting the food) is one of 
the secondary causes of constipation; another is the inability 
of the pancreas, through lack of nerve-force, to do its part in 
furnishing pancreatic juice. Thus, when we turn the cur- 
rent on the splanchnic, we start a three-horse team, which, 
pulling together in perfect harmony, will safely carry our 
constipated friend to the highway of perfect health, 

EXAMINATION. 

Make careful examination of the spine to ascertain the 
cause of the trouble. The ribs, in the normal condition, 
should present a flat surface and be an equal distance apart. 
If one is turned partially on its side, presenting its edge, as 
is very often the case, we have discovered the cause of a 
multitude of evils; if pressing either directly or indirectly 
upon the splanchnic, it cannot fail to produce constipatin, 
while its pressure upon the intercostal nerve, artery, and 
vein produces other complications; neither is the pressure 
of its edge upon the vital organs which it is supposed to pro- 
tect pleasant to contemplate. If physicians would make 
this examination in chronic cases which had failed to re- 
spond to drugs, they would be surprised at the number of 
cases in which this condition exists. 

TREATMENT. 

To set the rib, place the patient on the side; with the 
thumb of one hand upon the angle of the rib at fault, place 
Ihe thumb of the disengaged hand upon the edge of the rib 




Cut 16. — Reducing: Dislocation of Rib. 



STOMACH, IXTESTIXES, AXD PERITOXEl'M. 153 

at about its middle; hare the patient inhale, filling the lungs 
to their utmost capacity, while an assistant draws the arms 
high aboTe the head. 

It will be observed that the pectoralis major attaches to 
the seven or eight upper ribs, and to the humerus at the 
external bicipital ridge; thus the arm can be used as a lever 
to pull any of the upper ribs into line; at the instant the 
arm is thrown backward to be lowered, while the assistant 
is pulling hard, and patient's lungs are expanded, spring the 
rib forward by a hard pressure of the thumb upon its angle; 
at the same instant a pressure of the thumb upon its edge 
will turn it into position (cut 16). This treatment may not 
necessarily occasion much pain, and should be continued, 
making two or three trials each treatment, until the dislo- 
cation is reduced, providing it is stubborn and fails to 
respond promptly to the first treatment. The time required 
to set the rib will depend much uj)on the skill of the opera- 
tor and length of time that the rib has been in an abnormal 
position. 

In all cases where the difficulty is traced to an abnormal 
temperature in the spinal column, or contraction of muscles, 
thus affecting a nerve-center, the following accessory treat- 
ment should be given. This treatment should also be gi-ven 
where a rib is turned or partially dislocated. 

ACCESSORY TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side, and proceed to free 
all the muscles of the spine on each side as low as the 
twelfth dorsal vertebra. Let the arm of the patient rest on 
that of the operator, the patient's elbow pressing against the 
humerus, forming a lever with which the muscles of the 
scapula can be manipulated. With the fingers between the 
spine and scapula, pressing hard, move the scapula and mus- 



154 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

cles under the fingers upward (see cut 7), being particular 
not to let the hand slip oyer the muscles, but to move them. 
After each upward motion, move the fingers down an inch, 
nntil the last dorsal vertebra is reached, taking care not to 
work lower than the last rib. 

2. With the patient lying on the back, grasp the 
right wrist with the right hand, drawing the arm slowly but 
with some strength high above the head, at the same time 
placing the left hand between the shoulder-blades on the 
right side of the spine, about two inches below the upper 
part of the shoulder-blades, pressing hard as the arm comes 
up; lower the arm, the elbow passing below and at the 
side of the table. Repeat, moving the hand down the spine 
one inch every time, until you have reached the tenth dorsal 
vertebra, which will be found one inch below the inferior 
angle of the scapula. This excites and stimulates the 
splanchnic nerve. 

o. Knead the bowels (cut 17), beginning on the right 
side and at the lower portion of the abdomen, close to the 
bone, and immediately over the ileo-cecal valve. Work 
lightly at first, gradually using more strength, following the 
ascending colon upward from its commencement at the 
cecum to the under surface of the liver on the right side of 
the gall-bladder, where it bends abruptly to the left, forming 
the hepatic flexure; it now becomes the transverse colon, 
and passes transversely across the abdomen from right to 
left, where it curves dowuAvard beneath the lower end of the 
spleen, forming the splenic flexure. Th« descending colon 
passes almost vertically downward to the upper part of the 
left iliac fossa, where it terminates in the sigmoid flexure. 
The sigmoid flexure is the narrowest part of the colon. It 
is situated in the left iliac fossa, commencing at the termina- 
tion of the descending colon at the margin of the crest of 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 155 

the ilium, and ending in the rectum opposite the left sacro- 
iliac symphysis. Work across the abdomen, following the 
transverse colon and down the descending and sigmoid por- 
tions to the rectum. Next knead the small intestine, which 
is contained in the central lower part of the abdominal 
cavity, surrounded above and at the sides by the colon or 
large intestine. , 

4. Place the patient upon the back; with one hand 
upon the ribs, over the liver, press them down several times 
quite strongly, holding them a moment in this position 
before slowly removing the pressure, thus starting the cir- 
culation in and through the liver. Work as deeply as pos- 
sible with the fingers over the liver, under the ribs, raising 
them gently. Also carefully knead and manipulate the gall- 
bladder, endeavoring to empty its contents into the 
duodenum. 

5. Place the hand lightly over the liver, vibrating 
geutly for two minutes. See Vibration (pages 36 and 67). 

6. Place the patient upon the back; and with the 
hand under the chin, pull the head backward to the right and 
left, thus stretching the muscles, and freeing as much as pos- 
sible the pneumogastric nerve, which so largely controls the 
digestive organs. It is also well to manipulate, thorough 
and deep, the muscles on the front and sides of the neck, the 
object being to remove all obstructions, and equalize as 
much as possible the nerve-wave between the brain and 
solar plexus. 

This treatment should be given every other day, and can 
be administered in fifteen minutes. It will cure the most 
stubborn cases of constipation or torpid liver. Care should 
be taken to work as deep and as far under the ribs as pos- 
sible. Children and young people are often cured in a 
single treatment, but the average time required for a cure 



156 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

is from two to six weeks. In very stubborn cases it is well 
to tlush the bowels once or twice, until Nature begins to act. 
This treatment, if applied as directed, will be found infallible. 

ACUTE GASTEITIS, OR INDIGESTION; CHRONIC GASTRI- 
TIS, OR DYSPEPSIA. 

(Inflammation of the stomach, characterized by difficulty or 
failure in changing food into absorptive nutriment.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

These vary greatly, both in character and intensity, but 
there is commonly one or more of the following: impaired 
appetite^ flatulence, and nausea; eructations, which often 
bring up bitter or acid fluids; furred tongue, often flabby, 
large, or indented at the sides; foul taste or breath and heart 
burn; pain and a sensation of weight and inconvenience or 
fullness after a meal; irregular action of the bowels; head- 
ache, diminished mental energy and alertness, and dejection 
of spirits; palpitation of the heart or great vessels, and 
various affections in other organs. 

CAUSE. 

Dyspepsia, or indigestion, is usually caused by a con- 
stipated condition of the bowels, which, becoming over- 
loaded, hinder the action of the stomach until the glands of 
that organ become diseased. Thus we are again confronted 
with the parallel of an electric car, which, having lost its 
current, obstructs the main track. We expect to prove to 
the intelligent reader that when the peristaltic action of the 
small intestine loses part of its nerve-power, occasioned by 
a pressure on the splanchnic center at or near the spine, the 
foundation is laid not only for constipation, livei^ complaint, 
and various stomach and Tcidney troubles, but by blocking 
the main track, one organ after another becomes diseased, 




Cut 17. — Kneading the Bowels. 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 159 

and finally the stomach, bloated or filled with gas, presses 
so hard upon the diaphragm, compressing the left lung, that 
it affects even the lungs and heart. Many cases of heart 
trouble we have traced directly to this cause, and cured by 
working on these never-failing principles, 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; with the fingers of 
both hands upon the spine, beginning at the upper cervicals, 
move the muscles upward and outward, very deep and thor- 
oughly, as low as the last dorsal (see cut 7). Tender spots will 
usually be found between the second and sixth dorsal, over 
the nerves of assimilation, and should be treated thoroughly. 
As soon as the soreness begins to disappear, the patient will 
commence to recover. Careful investigation in the immedi- 
ate region where the tenderness is discovered will lisually 
enable the operator to detect some slight contraction in the 
deep muscles, thus obstructing the circulation, and produc- 
ing a congested condition. 

2. Place the hand gently over the stomach and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) strongly two minutes, thus stimulating 
the circulation through that organ. 

3. In all cases where constipation is present, begin- 
ning at the cecum, manipulate the colon very thoroughly 
and carefully, following it its entire length to the rectum, 
endeavoring to manipulate and move forward any hardened 
lumps of feces that may be discovered. Also manipulate 
the gall-bladder and liver. See Constipation (page 150). 

4. Stand behind patient, and, raising the right arm 
high above the head, lifting strong, press hard with the 
thumb on the fourth dorsal vertebra, lowering the arm with 
a backward motion. This pressure reaches the nerves that 
control the pyloric valve, causing, after a few treatments, 



160 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the pyloric orifice to permit the escape of gases and undi- 
gested food into the duodenum. 

5. With left hand under patient's chin, draw the 
head backward and to the side; with the right manipulate 
the muscles of the neck, thereby freeing the pneumogastric 
nerve (cut 18). 

This disease is usually caused by a complication of 
troubles, all of which must be removed before we can hope to 
effect a cure. A great deal, therefore, depends upon the 
good judgment of the operator in discovering the real cause, 
and employing such treatment as will reach the conditions as 
they exist. 

6.' In all cases of fever, hold the vasomotor two or 
three minutes.. See Yaso-motor (page 253). 

GASTRALGIA. 

(Neuralgia of the stomach.) 

SYMrTOMS. 

Spasmodic pains, shooting and shifting, usually brief in 
duration, and may be relieved by vomiting or belching. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the back ; if there are any indi- 
cations of constipation, give thorough treatment for same 
(page 150). 

2. Place the hand lightly over the sternum, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) gently for three minutes. 

3. Place the patient on a stool ; and with the thumbs 
upon the angles of the fifth pair of ribs, have an assistant 
standing in front, raise the arms high above the head, lifting 
quite strong, as the patient fills the lungs with air; press 
hard with the thumbs as the arms are lowered with a back- 




Cut 18.— Freeing and Stimulating Pneumogastric Nerve. 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 163 

ward motion, patient permitting the elbows to bend, as the 
arms are pressed quite strongly backward and downward. 
This treatment stretches the muscles, frees the intercostal 
nerves, arteries, and veins, at the same time acting upon the 
splanchnic nerves. Place the thumbs upon the next two 
lower ribs, raise the arms as before, and repeat until the 
tenth dorsal is reached. 

4. Place the patient on the back; with one hand under 
the chin, draw the head backward, rotating it from side 
to side, at the same instant manipulating the muscles over 
the pneumogastric with the disengaged hand (cut 18). It is 
also advisable to place one hand under the occipital, the 
other under the chin, and give gentle extension. 

This treatment usually gives immediate relief, and a 
continuation of the same once each day, occupying about 
fifteen minutes, a speedy cure. 

GASTRECTASIA. 

(Dilatation of .the stomach, due to obstruction of the pyloric 

orifice.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Heart dislocated, action rapid; upper portion of the 
abdomen enlarged; pressure on the surrounding structures; 
palpitation; difficult breathing; and inability to remove 
the gas. 

TREATMENT. 

In this disease, while we can hardly hope to effect a cure, 
the patient can often be greatly benefited by the following 
treatment : 

1. Place the patient upon the left side; an assistant 
holding the hip, draw the right arm slowly but strongly 



164 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

above the head, holding it in this position for a moment; 
lower the arm with a backward motion, pressing hard with 
the thumb of the disengaged hand upon the fourth dorsal 
vertebra; repeat this operation, pressing hard the second 
time upon the fifth dorsal. 

2. Place the patient on the back; the hand of the 
operator resting lightly, as near as possible, over the pyloric 
orifice, vibrate (pages 36 and 67) strongly for three minutes. 

3. Place the patient upon a stool; the knee of the 
operator between patient's scapula?, grasp the patient's 
wrists, and draw the arms slowly but strongly high above 
the head, pressing hard with the knee as the arms are 
lowered with a backward motion (cut 5). Repeat this opera- 
tion two or three times, as it expands the chest and relieves 
the difficult breathing. 

This treatment should be given every day, and occupy 
about ten minutes. 

GASTRIC CARCINOMA. 

(Cancer of the stomach.) 
SYMPTOMS. 

Loss of appetite, flesh, and strength; the vomitus is 
dark and streaked with blood. 
No cure in Osteopathy. 

GASTRIC ULCER. 
(Ulcer of the stomach.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Annoying and burning pain, confined to small area in 
the epigastrium; pain increased by food, and relieved after 
digestion or by vomiting; pain and tenderness near the 
spinal column, opposite the site of the epigastric pain. 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 165 

TEEATMEJ^T. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward the 
entire length of the spinal column, deeply but gently, being 
very thorough in the dorsal region, and particularly thor- 
ough and gentle in the immediate region of all spots where 
tenderness exists along the si^inal column. 

2. Place the hand under the chin, and draw the head 
backward", rotating it from right to left; with the disengaged 
hand manipulating the muscles immediately over the pneu- 
mogastric nerve. 

3. Place the hands under the shoulders of the patient, 
an assistant grasping the ankles, and give thorough and 
strong extension of the spinal column, as this extension, 
together with the two preceding treatments, tends to stimu- 
late and equalize the nerves which control the alimentary 
canal. 

4. Place the hand lightly and as near as possible over 
the ulcer, and vibrate (pages 36 and 67) gently for three or 
four minutes. 

This entire treatment should not occupy over ten or fif- 
teen minutes; should be administered each day; and if 
given correctly, will produce very gratifying results. 

GASTRIC NEUROSIS. 

(Functional derangement of the stomach, due to impairment 
of motor or sensory powers, or secretions.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Manifestations of hysteria; feeling of fullness, tension, 
and nausea; sensation of heat or cold, annoying or pulling; 
may be relieved by food, apt to be aggravated by fasting, or 
restriction of diet. 



166 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See 1, 2, and 3, Treatment for Gastric Ulcer 
(page 165). 

2. Flex the limbs strongly against tlie chest, abduct- 
ing and adducting them several times and extending with a 
light jerk. This treatment starts and increases the circula- 
tion to the limbs. 

Should the patient be constipated, apply Constipation 
Treatment (page 150). 

3. Place the patient upon a stool; operator placing 
knee between the shoulders, draw the arms strongly above 
the head two or three times as the patient inhales; lower the 
arms wilh a backward motion, pressing hard with the knee 
as the shoulders are forced backward. This treatment is 
very beneficial, as it expands the chest and frees the 
circulation. 

4. Place the hand on the stomach and vibrate (pages 
36 and 67) gently two or three minutes. 

In case of fever, place the hands upon the sides of the 
neck, the fingers almost meeting over the spinal processes of 
the upper cervicals, and press gently two or three minutes on 
the vaso-motor center (page 253). 

This treatment will occupy about fifteen or twenty min- 
utes; should be administered every other day. We should 
expect to see a decided improvement after the first few treat- 
ments, a continuation of which will effect a cure. 

CtAStric vertigo. 

(Dizziness, usually associated with disorders of the stomach.1 

SYMPTOMS. 
In acute form there is coldness; objects appear to go 
round and round; patient reels ; seasick feeling; may vomit* 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PEFITONEUM. 167 

face pale; pulse feeble; vision blurred. In chronic form 
there is headache; noise in the ears; feeling of reeling and 
dizziness. 

TREATMENT. 
See General Treatment. 

ACUTE ENTERITIS. 

(Inflammation of the small intestine.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Colicky pains about the umbilicus; urine highly colored 
and scanty; tenderness over the abdomen; diarrhea. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Very gentle but thorough kneading of the bowels, 
being very particular to work from left to right, as this 
treatment not only assists in checking the diarrhea, but 
starts the circulation, thereby assisting in reducing the 
inflammation in the small intestine. (Treating from left to 
right assists in checking the peristaltic action of the bowels, 
Jlnd diarrhea. Manipulating the bowels from right to left 
assists in increasing the peristaltic action, and should be 
always given in constipation.) 

2. Place the hand lightly over the intestine, and 
vibrate (pages 36 and 67) gently two or three minutes. 

3. Standing at the side of the bed or table, place the 
arms around patient's bodj', the ends of the fingers pressing 
upon each side of the spine in the lumbar region and immedi- 
ately below the last dorsal vertebra; raise the patient gently 
until only the shoulders and limbs touch the bed (cut 19); 
hold in this position a moment, and repeat. This treatment 
seems to get the body in such a position as to throw a direct 
pressure upon the solar plexus, thereby obstructing the 



168 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

nerve- wave to the bowels and checking the peristaltic action. 

4, Drawing the arms slowly but strongly above the 
head, pressing strongly upon the fourth or fifth dorsal ver- 
tebra as they are lowered with a backward motion, will 
almost instantly check the colicky pains in the region of the 
umbilicus. 

5. In this disease we often discover the lumbar 
region in a very sensitive condition, in which case the mus- 
cles of this region on each side of the spine should be manipu- 
lated, moving them upward and outward gently but deeply. 
The soreness will immediately begin to disappear, and with 
it the urine will resume its normal quantity and color. 

In all cases of fever hold the vaso-motor two or three 
minutes after each treatment (page 253), 

This treatment, which must be given in a very gentle 
and careful manner, occupying fifteen or twenty minutes 
each day, should give the patient immediate relief. 

CHRONIC ENTERITIS, OR INTESTINAL CATARRH. 
(Usually follows acute attacks.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Sallow complexion; constipation, alternating with diar- 
rhea; stools containing undigested food; headache; im- 
paired nutrition; colicky pains; and abdomen distended. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward, 
gently but deeply, the entire length of the spinal column, 
being very particular to treat thoroughly in all regions where 
any tenderness is discovered. Stimulation in this manner 
over all the nerve-centers the entire length of the sr»inal 




Cut. 19.— Diarrhea Treatment. 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 171 

column tends to equalize the nerve-wave to the various 
organs. 

2. Place the patient on the back; with the hand 
under the chin, draw the head backward, rotating it from 
side to side, with the disengaged hand manipulating the 
muscles immediately over the pneumogastric nerve. 

3. In all cases where constipation is present, a light 
Constipation Treatment (page 150) should be given. In 
cases of diarrhea, give a light treatment for the same (page 
182); the object being to equalize the action of the bowels. 

4. Drawing the arms strongly above the head two or 
three times, at the same instant pressing hard upon the 
fourth or fifth dorsal vertebra, will relieve the colicky pain. 

This treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes; will 
usually give immediate relief; and should be given every 
other day until complete recovery is effected. 

CHOLERA MORBUS. 

(Inflammation of the stomach and intestines, resulting from 

an irritating diet.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Cholera morbus is a violent purging and vomiting, at- 
tended with gripes and a constant desire to go to stool. It 
comes on suddenly, and is most common in autumn. There 
is hardly any disease that kills more quickly than this when 
proper means are not used in due time for removing it. It 
is generally preceded by heartburn, sour belchings, and 
flatulence, with pain in the stomach and intestines; to these 
succeed excessive vomiting and purging of green, yellow, 
or blackish colored bile, with distension of the stomach and 
violent griping pains. There is likewise great thirst, with 
a very quick unequal pulse, and often a fixed acute pain 



172 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

about the region of the navel. As the disease advances, the 
pulse often sinks so low as to become quite imperceptible; 
the extremities grow cold or cramped and are often covered 
with a clammy sweat, the urine is obstructed, and there is 
palpitation of the heart. Violent hiccoughing, fainting, 
and convulsions are the signs of approaching death. 

EXPLANATORY. 

Cholera morbus can often be cured instantly. ' Of 
the hundreds of cases treated by us, we have yet to find 
the first that did not respond, and we stand ready to wager 
our reputation that there never was and never will be a case 
of this disease that cannot be cured by this method of treat- 
ment if properly applied. This may justly be considered the 
grandest discovery of this or anj^ other age. And we beg the 
medical fraternity throughout our land, who usually look 
with eyes of skepticism on anything out of the ordinary, to 
try this one great principle, which is destined to save thou- 
sands of lives each year. We trust that each and every one 
who may chance to read these pages will remember our 
treatment for cholera morbus. Not because it is more reli- 
able than any other great principle laid down in this work, 
but it is so simple and of such vast importance in times of 
need, so infallible, and gives such immediate relief. 

That the reader may gain a correct understanding- of 
this great principle, we will return to the anatomy of the 
machinery of human life. Once more comparing the cerebro- 
spinal cord, the brain, and the nerves to a telegraphic system, 
we will trace the cause of cholera morbus and the excited 
condition of the digestive organs directly to the brain. It 
will be wise, in this connection, as some of our readers may 
not be very familiar with anatomy and physiology, to sketch 
briefly the process of digestion. 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 173 

Food, when taken into the mouth, undergoes two proc- 
esses, which are inseparable and simultaneous in action, 
being mastication and insalivation. In the short time occu- 
pied by the passage of the food through the esophagus no 
special change takes place. In the stomach the food is 
mixed with the juices of that organ, and is converted into 
chyme. The chyme begins to leave the stomach through 
the pyloric orifice soon after gastric digestion has begun, 
some passing into the duodenum in about half an hour. The 
materials which resist gastric secretion or are affected very 
slowly by it are retained many hours in the stomach, and 
the pylorus may refuse exit to such materials for an indefi- 
nite length of time, so that, after causing much uneasiness, 
they are finally removed by vomiting. Many solid masses 
escape through the pylorus, however, when it opens to let 
out the chyme. 

The small intestine is a convoluted tube, varying in 
length from twenty to thirty feet, which gradually dimin- 
ishes in size from its commencement to its termination. The 
power which forces the food and chyme through this long 
convoluted tube is called the peristaltic action, and is con- 
trolled by the "main battery," the brain. A wave of con- 
traction passes from the pylorus along the circular fibers 
so as to look like a broad ring of constriction, progressing 
slowly downward. The longitudinal fibers at the same time 
contract so as to shorten the piece of intestine immediately 
below the ring of constriction, and also causes a certain 
amount of rolling movement of those loops of intestine 
which are free enough to move. In cholera morbus this per- 
istaltic action becomes increased to an alarming extent. 
,Food has been taken into the stomach, to remove which a 
great amount of nerve-power is required; and when it is 
finally expelled, and the current still on, we have a machine 
running away with itself. We are as yet unable to deter- 



174 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

mine the precise cause of Nature failing to apply her brakes, 
and check the current at the proper moment, but we have 
succeeded in locating the point on which a slight pressure of 
the hand will instantly slow up the machine. 

The great splanclmic and riglit pneumogastric nerves form 
the solar plexus, or "great abdominal brain," and control 
the peristaltic action of the bowels. Now it is obvious that 
a pressure on these nerves long enough to break the current 
will check the peristaltic action of the intestines. The 
pneumogastric has a more extensive distribution than any 
of the other cranial nerves. Passing through the neck and 
thorax to the upper part of the abdomen^ it is composed of 
both motor and sensory fibers. It supplies the organs of 
voice and respiration with motor and sensory fibers, and 
the pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and heart with motor- 
fibers. It emerges from the cranium through the jugular 
foramen, passes vertically down the neck within the sheath 
of the carotid vessels, lying between the internal carotid 
artery and the external jugular vein as far as the thyroid 
cartilage. Thus it will be seen that it can be reached by 
a strong, steady pressure on the right side of the windpipe, 
as it is commonly called, in the lower part of the neck. The 
right splanchnic nerve will respond to a pressure close to the 
spine between the sixth and seventh ribs. 

While this treatment will cure cholera morbus, and was 
arrived at by studying man as a machine from a scientific 
standpoint, a much simpler method, producing the same 
results, will be given as our infallible mode of treating these 
diseases. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on a stool, the operator standing 
behind. The operator now places his knee on the spine, just 
below the last rib, grasping the patient's shoulders, and 




Cut 20.— Diarrhea Treatment. 



-12- 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 177 

draws him gently but firmly backward as far as possible 
(cut 20). Let all motions be slow, allowing the patient time 
to relax the muscles. Ninety per cent of all cases will be 
cured instantly by this one move. In aggravated cases, 
where the patient is bedfast, while lying on the back, place 
one hand under each side, the fingers pressing on each side of 
the spine just below the last ribs, and two or three times 
slowly raise the patient until only the shoulders and pelvis 
touch the bed (cut 19). 

2. Press lightly with the palm of the hand on the 
umbilicus (and stronger as the patient becomes accustomed 
to the pressure) for one minute. 

3. Hold the vaso-motor center for two or three min- 
utes, and your patient is out of danger (see cut 13). It is 
A'ery seldom that anything further than one backward move- 
ment is necessary. 

Taken suddenly with cholera morbus between St. Louis 
and Kansas City, the writer cured himself instantly by bend- 
ing far backward over the back of the car seat. Any of our 
readers can do likewise. 

While on this subject, we will mention the case of a lady 
at Miami, I. T. We received an urgent call from her husband 
one Tuesday marning, but, being overwhelmed with oflflce 
work, it seemed impossible for us to take the time to drive 
twenty miles into the Indian Nation; so it was arranged that 
if the drugs of the local doctors failed, and she was still alive, 
we should drive down Friday night. We reached her bedside 
at midnight (Friday night), and found her just alive. We 
treated her once, and in a week she was walking on the streets 
of Miami in perfect health. 

CRAMP IN THE BOWELS. 

Cramp in the bowels is caused by the too rapid action 
of the intestines, one fold being thrown over another; this 



178 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

can usually be instantly cured by bending tlie patient far 
backward as in flux. In rare cases it will be found neces- 
sary to place the patient on the back and gently but firmly 
knead the bowels, working deep, thus freeing the parts and 
giving immediate relief. 

Vibration two or three minutes over the bowels is very 
beneficial in all cases of diarrhea or cramp in the bowels. 
See Vibration (pages 36 and 67). 

CHOLERA INFANTUM. 
(Inflammation of the stomach and bowels of children.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Usually occurs in the summer months. Rapid wasting; 
fever; vomiting; watery and fetid diarrhea; convulsions; 
coma; depressed fontanelles. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the child upon its back; the hands of the 
operator on each side of the spine below the last dorsal, the 
ends of the fingers pressing hard on each side of the spine; 
raise and hold the patient a moment in this position, the head 
and limbs only touching the bed. 

2. Place the hand lightly over the bowels, and 
vibrate (pages 36 and 67) gently one or two minutes. 

3. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, the 
fingers almost meeting over the spinous processes of the 
upper cervicals; press gently two or three minutes with the 
fingers upon the vaso-motor (cut 13). 

This treatment, if properly applied, is infallible. If the 
child is restless, and refuses to submit to the operation, it can 
be treated upon the mother's lap by bending it backward 
while pressing upon the lumbar vertebrae; the object being 




Cut 21. — Holding the Splanchnic Nerves. 



STOMACH, INTESTIXES. AND PERITONEUM. 181 

to get the body in such a position as to throw a direct press- 
ure upon the solar plexus. 

We might mention in this connection a very prominent 
physician at Galena, Kas, who was converted to Osteopathy 
by the results achieved in the treatment of a case of cholera 
infantum. While the doctor was fairly liberal in his views, 
and willing to investigate this new science, it seemed unrea- 
sonable to him to believe that this disease could be cured 
without the use of medicine. Having a case of cholera 
infantum, in its last stages, after having applied the drug 
treatment in vain, he gave the little one, one evening, an 
osteopathic treatment, and was surprised upon his visit the 
next morning to find it improving quite rapidly. A continu- 
ation of the treatment in a few days effected a cure. 

CRAMP IN THE STOMACH AND VOMITING. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Bend the patient backward as in diarrhea. 

2. Press steadily on the pit of the stomach with the 
palm of the hand for a moment. 

3. Place the knee between the shoulders, raising the 
arms high above the head (see cut 5). 

4. Permit the patient to lie on the back, and, reaching 
over as in cut 21, with each of the fingers close to the spine, 
between and a little below the scapuhie, press strongly a 
moment, after which hold the vaso-motor center (see cut 13). 

This treatment will cure the most aggravated cases, 
usually in a few moments. It will be observed that we are 
working here on the splanchnic nerves, which are in direct 
communication with the stomach. 



182 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CHRONIC DIARRHEA. 

(Frequent evacuation of the bowels, usually resulting from 
amyloid diseases, but may be due to chronic inflamma- 
tion of the bowels, causing increased peristalsis.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Increased movement of the bowels; stools light in col- 
or, containing mucus; nervousness; intestinal indigestion. 
More common in females. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper dorsal, move the muscles upward and outward, very 
deeply, the entire length of the dorsal region. Treat the 
opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Place the patient on a stool; the operator placing 
the knee against the back of the patient, just below the last 
dorsal, draw the patient backward, slowly but strongly, as 
far as the patient can stand without too much inconvenience; 
hold in this position a moment and repeat. 

3. Place the hand lightly over the bowels, with the 
patient lying on the back; vibrate (pages 36 and 67) gently 
two minutes. 

4. Place the hand under the chin, drawing the head 
backward, rotating it gently from side to side, with the dis- 
engaged hand manipulating the muscles immediately over 
the pneumogastric. 

This treatment should be applied each day; will require 
about fifteen minutes ; and, if correctly given, will cure any 
case of chronic diarrhea. 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 183 

FLUX, OR ACUTE DYSENTERY. 

(Inflammatiou of the large intestine, with frequent eyacua- 
tion of the bowels.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Prostration; fever; evacuations mucous and bloody; 
vertigo; weakness; vomiting; nausea; and headache. 
Usually occurs in summer or fall. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; bee-innine at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward, 
gently and carefully, along the entire length of the spinal 
column. Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Stand beside the bed, patient lying on his back; 
place one hand on each side of the spine, below the last dor- 
sal, the fingers pressing close to the spine upon each side; 
raise the patient, his weight resting upon the ends of the 
fingers, until his body is several inches off the bed; hold in 
this position for a moment ; and repeat, this time placing the 
fingers nearer the sacrum. 

8. Place the hand lightly over the bowels, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) gently two or three minutes. 

4. Place the hands upon each side of the neck, the 
fingers almost meeting over the spinous processes of the 
upper cervicals (see cut 13); press gently two or three min- 
utes, to reduce the fever. See Vaso-motor (page 253). 

Treatment will occupy ten or fifteen minutes, and should 
be given every four hours. 

CHRONIC DYSENTERY. 
(May follow an acute attack.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Similar to the acute form, but without fever; com 



184 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

plexion sallow; wasting; skin dry; nrlne albuminous; and 
anemia. 

TREATMENT. 
See Flux or Acute Dysentery (page 183). Treatment 
should be given each day, omitting No. 4. 

APPENDICITIS. 

(Inflammation of the vermiform appendix.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Fever; anorexia; severe pain in the right iliac fossa, 
increased by motion; indication of a sausage-shaped tumor; 
vomiting' usually attended with nausea, but may not occur 
if there is diarrhea. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the back; beginning at the ileo- 
cecal valve, manipulate gently, but as deep as possible, the 
ascending, transverse, and descending colon, endeavoring to 
move any hardened lump of feces toward the rectum. 

2. Place the patient on the left side and manipulate 
. very gently at first, gradually working deeper and stronger 

over the cecum and vermiform appendix, manipulating 
these parts as tlioroughly as possible. If this treatment is 
given in a very gentle, careful manner, it is surprising how 
deep and thorough these parts can be manipulated, without 
giving pain, and the immediate relief experienced by the 
patient. 

3. Place the hand lightly over the cecum, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) gently one or two minutes. 

4. Grasping the right hand of patient, an assistant 
holding the hip, draw the arm strongly abov(i the head, giv- 
ing thorough extension (cut 22). 




Cut 22. — Appendicitis Treatment. 



STOMACE, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 187 

5. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward 
gently the entire length of the spinal column, giving particu- 
lar attention to that portion which seems sensitive to the 
touch ; treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

6. Place the hands on each side of the neck, fingers 
almost meeting over the spinous processes of the upper cervi- 
cals; press genth' with the fingers three or four minutes 
upon the vaso-motor, to check the fever. 

This treatment should be given each day, and occupy 
about fifteen minutes. First treatment will usually give 
immediate relief. 

TYPHLITIS. 
(Inflammation of the cecum.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain in the right iliac fossa; nausea; constipation; 
fever; sausage-shaped tumor. 

TREATMENT. 

See Appendicitis (page 184). 

PERITYPHLITIS. 
(Inflammation of the tissues surrounding the cecum.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
It usually occurs in the course of appendicitis or typhli- 
tis. Symptoms, except the tumor is not sausage-shaped, 
similar to the latter. Patient usually lies with thighs partly 
flexed upon the right side. 

TREATMENT. 
See Appendicitis (page 184). 



18S OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ENTEROPTOSIS. 

(Falling down of a number of the abdominal organs on 
account of relaxation of the supporting ligaments.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Heaviness and weight in the abdomen, with distress; 
and displacement of the organs. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease can be greatly benefited and is sometimes 
cured by a long continuation of our General Treatment (page 
306), the object being to free and stimulate the circulation to 
the weakened muscles and ligaments supporting the dis- 
placed organs. 

INTUSSUSCEPTION. 

(Slipping of one fjart of the intestine into another.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Paroxysms; sudden pain; sausage-shaped tumor in the 
abdomen; dysentery; small intestine entering the large one 
at the ileo-cecal orifice is the most common. 

TREATMENT. 

Beginning a few inches above the sausage-shaped tumor, 
manipulate the bowels, gently at first, gradually working 
stronger and deeper, 'endeavoring, if possible, to move the 
intestine backward and out of the larger one. This treat- 
ment should be very careful and thorough, and continued at 
intervals until the desired resnlt is accomplished. It is 
always advisable to place the hand lightly over the tumor 
and vibrate (pages 30 and 67) two or three minutes. 



STOMACH, IXTESTINES, AND PERIT0NEU2I. 189 

INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION. 

(May be calculus, gall-stone, or fecal impaction.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pulse feeble and rapid; surface cold and clammy; 
abdominal pain; vomiting; rumbling, and distended 
abdomen. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Very thorough, careful manipulation of the large 
and small intestines; working gently at first, gradually 
deeper and stronger, as the patient becomes accustomed to 
the manipulation. Patient should lie upon the back, with 
the limbs slightly flexed, thus relieving the tension upon the 
abdominal muscles. After manipulating the bowels a few 
moments, work deeper, and endeavor to locate, if possible, 
the obstruction, which must be kneaded and manipulated in 
any manner which will best tend to move it onward toward 
the rectum. 

2. Thorough and careful Treatment to Equalize the 
Circulation ipage 114). 

Treatment should be given every day, and will occupy 
about twenty minutes. 

INTESTINAL CARCINOMA. 
(Cancer of the bowels.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

There may be no symptoms, except general failure of 
the health, until obstruction of the bowels takes place. 
No cure in Osteopathy. 



190 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

INTESTINAL TUBERCULOSIS. 

(Consumption of the bowels.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Anemia; diarrhea; irregular fever; rapid emaciation. 
No cure in Osteopathy. 

INTESTINAL AMYLOID DEGENERATION. 

(Starch-like wasting of the bowels.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Diarrhea, associated with amyloid diseases of other 
organs; changes in the urine; and enlargement of the liver 
and spleen. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

INTESTINAL PARASITES. 

(The most common are Cestodes, or Tape-worms, and 
Nematodes, or Eound-worms. The former are Tenia 
Solium, Tenia Mediocanellata, and BothriocepJialus Latus. 
The most common of the latter are Lumhricoides, 
Oxyuris Termicularis, and Trichina Spiralis.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Capricious appetite; uneasiness in the abdomen; col- 
icky pains; nausea; insomnia; possibly vomiting; itching 
of the nose and anus; and epileptic convulsions. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

ACUTE PERITONITIS. 

(Inflammation of the peritoneum.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Sudden and chilly feelings, or rigor; intense pain in the 
abdomen, aggravated by movements or pressure; patient 



STOMACH, INTESTINES, AND PERITONEUM. 191 

lies on the back, with legs drawn up; tympanites; nausea; 
vomiting; elevation of temperature; drawn face and anxious 
expression. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the back; beginning at the 
cecum, manipulate very gently, following the colon its en- 
tire length to the rectum. This treatment should occupy 
several minutes; gradually working deeper and stronger. 
The small intestine must also be kneaded very carefully. 
Great caution must be exercised to begin very gently, grad- 
ually working deeper and stronger, as in this manner the 
patient can be greatly relieved and the treatment given with 
very little pain. 

2. Place the hand lightly over the intestine; vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) gently for two minutes, thus starting 
the circulation, and reducing the inflammation in the 
peritoneum. 

3. Grasp the patient's wrists, and draw the arras 
slowly, gently, but with some strength, above the head, as 
the patient inhales. 

4. Place the patient upon the side; moving the mus- 
cles upward and outwa.rd the entire length of the spinal 
column, gently but deep; treat the opposite side in a similar 
manner. 

5. Place the hands on each side of the neck, the 
finger-tips almost meeting over the spinous processes of the 
upper cervicals fcut 13) ; press gently with the fingers three 
or four minutes, to reduce the fever. 

This treatment, if carefully given, will occupy about 
thirty minutes, and give immediate relief. Should be giien 
once each day, until recovery. 

—13— 



l92 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CHRONIC PERITONITIS. 
(May follow an acute attack.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

The omentum is hard and rolled up close to its attach- 
ment to the stomach; coughing or speaking often increases 
pain; tongue often cracked and red; greenish vomit; and 
constipation. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Peritonitis (page 191). 

ASCITES. 

(Dropsy of the abdomen. Fluid in the peritoneal cavity.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Skin tense; enlargement of the abdomen; the navel 
may project; fluctuation or waving of fluid on tapping. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Thorough manipulation of the bowels and abdo- 
]nen. See Constipation Treatment (page 150). 

2. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
tenth dorsal, move the muscles upward and outward very 
thoroughly and deeply to the lower end of the sacrum. This 
treatment stimulates the kidneys to more rapid action. 

This treatment should be very thorough and careful, and 
occupy about fifteen minutes, every other day. 

PERITONEAL CARCINOMA. 

(Cancer of the peritoneum.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
This disease usually occurs in old people, and follows 
cancer in other organs; pain, with appearance of a tumor. 



STOMACH, INTE8TINES, AND PERITONEUM. 193 

More common in females. Progressive emaciation; ascites 
usually develop, with bloody exudation. 
Xo cure in Osteopathy. 

PERITONEAL TUBERCULOSIS. 
(Tuberculosis of the peritoneum.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

May continue without any symptoms; may simulate 
suppurative peritonitis, except that its course is more pro- 
longed and less pronounced; fluctuation of temperature. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 



194 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 



Diseases of the Liver. 



THE LIVER. 

The liver is a gland, intended for the secretion of sugar 
and bile, remarkable for its size, equaling that of all the other 
glands, and for its connection with the system of the portal 
vein, which ramifies in its substance. This organ fills almost 
all of the right hypochondrium, a great part of the epigas- 
trium, and advances into the left hypochondrium as far as 
the mammary line, in the neighborhood of the spleen. It is 
situated below the diaphragm, which separates it from the 
lungs and heart; above the stomach, duodenum, transverse 
colon, and small intestine, which forms a sort of pillow; 
behind are the false ribs, which protect it. 

Capsule. — The liver is covered by a thin, fibrous, firmly 
adherent capsule, which has on its free surface a layer of 
endothelium, derived from the peritoneum. The capsule 
sends fine septa into the organ, between the lobules, but it is 
also continued into the interior of the transverse fissure, 
where it surrounds the portal vein, hepatic artery, and bile- 
duct, and accompanies these structures as the Capsule of GKs- 
son, or interlobular connective tissue. The spaces in which 
these structures lie are known as the portal canals. 

Lobules. — The liver consists of innumerable small lob- 
ules, one to two millimeters in diameter. These lobules are 
visible to the naked eye, and all have the same structure. 

Cells. — The liver or hepatic cells are irregular polygonal 
cells of about 1-1000 of an inch in diameter. They form 
anastomosing columns, which radiate from the center to the 
periphery of each lobule. 



TEE LITER. 195 

The appearance of the cells varies with the period of 
digestion. During hunger the cells are finely granular and 
very cloudy, and contain little glycogen, but many pigment- 
granules, and the nucleus is more frequently absent. During 
activity after a full meal the cells are larger and more 
distinct. 

Bile-Ducts. — The two hepatic ducts, which carry the bile 
out of the liver, emerge from the right and left hepatic sub- 
stance, at the transverse fissure; they unite, and are joined 
by the cystic duct, which is a continuation of the tapering 
extremity of the gall-bladder. By the union of the hepatic 
duct Tvith the cystic duct, the common bile-duct is formed. 
It pierces the coat of the duodenum very obliquely, and 
opens along with the pancreatic duct into the duodenum. 

The finest bile-capillaries, channels, or canaliculi arise 
at the center of the lobule, and indeed throughout the whole 
lobule they form a regular anastomosing network of very 
fine tubes or channels. The bile-capillary network is much 
closer than the capillary network of the blood. Extensive 
minute intercellular passages are said to pass from the bile- 
cajjillaries into the interior of the liver-cells, where they com- 
municate with small cavities, or vacuoles. As the blood- 
capillaries run along the edge of the liver-cells, and the bile- 
capillaries between the op^josed surfaces of adjacent cells, 
the two systems of canals within the lobule are kept separate. 
Toward the peripheral part of the lobule the bile-capillaries 
are larger, while adjoining channels anastomose, and leave 
the lobule, where they become interlobular ducts, which join 
with other similar ducts to form larger bile-ducts. These 
accompany the hepatic artery and portal vein, and leave the 
liver at the transverse fissure. 

Bile. — Although the bile is secreted continuously, and 
passes along the hepatic duct in most animals, it is only 



196 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

poured into the intestine at certain times. In tlie intervals 
it is carried along the cystic duct and stored up in the gall- 
bladder. At certain times it is poured out by the common 
bile-duct into the duodenum. Bile is a yellowish-brown or 
dark-green transparent fluid, with a sweetish, strongly bit- 
ter taste, feeble musk-like odor, and neutral reaction. 

Gall-Bladder. — The gall-bladder is a pear-shaped sac, 
( apable of containing 20-25 c.c. of bile. In some animals the 
gall-bladder is wanting, as in the donkey, elephant, and 
mouse. 

Blood- Vessels. — The liver is supplied with blood by the 
hepatic artery and the portal vein. 

The hepatic artery supplies a small quantity of arterial 
blood to the liver. The blood, after circulating through the 
liver, is returned by the hepatic veins to the inferior vena 
cava. 

The branches of the hepatic artery accompany the 
branches of the portal vein and bile-ducts in the portal canals 
between the lobules, and in their course give off capillaries 
TO supply the walls of the portal veins and larger bile-ducts. 
The branches of the hepatic artery anastomose frequently 
where they lie between the lobules. On reaching the per- 
iphery of the lobules, a number of capillaries are given off, 
which penetrate the lobule, and terminate in the capillaries 
of the portal vein. These capillaries, however, which supply 
the walls of the portal vein and large bile-ducts, terminate 
in veins which end in the portal vein. 

The portal vein is formed by the confluence of the gas- 
tric, splenic, inferior and superior mesenteric veins, whereby 
the short, wide, vena portae is formed. It enters the liver 
at the transverse fissure, accompanied by the bile-duct and 
hepatic artery, and is distributed between the lobules. The 



THE LIVER. 197 

portal vein returns the blood from the stomach, pancreas, 
intestines, and spleen; hence it carries some of the products 
of digestion directly to the liver, where some of them are 
materially changed by the hepatic cells, as they pass slowly 
through the hepatic blood-vessels. 

The portal vein, after its entrance into the liver, at the 
portal fissure, gives off numerous branches, lying between 
the lobules, and ultimately forming small trunks which 
I'each the periphery of the lobules, where they form a rich 
plexus. The branches of the portal vein, lying between the 
lobules, are called the interlobular veins, which are always 
provided with thick muscular walls. From these veins num- 
erous capillaries are given off to the entire periphery of the 
lobule. The capillaries converge towards the center of the 
lobule. As they proceed inward they form elongated 
meshes, and between the capillaries lie rows or columns of 
liver-cells. The capillaries are relatively wide, and are so 
arranged as to lie between the edges of the columns of cells, 
and never between the surfaces of two adjacent cells. The 
capillaries converge toward the center of each lobule, where 
they join to form one large vein, the hejjatic, intralobular, or 
central vein, which traverses each lobule, reaches its surface 
at one point, passes out and joins similar veins from other 
lobnles to form the sublobular veins. Branches of the 
hepatic veins have very thin walls. 

Nerves. — The nerves consist partly of medullated, but 
chiefly of nou-medullated fibers. From branches of the sym- 
pathetic, the terminal branhes of the right vagus, and some 
branches of the left vagus, to the hepatic plexus, the hepatic 
plexus being that portion of the solar plexus which embraces 
the portal vein, bile-duct, and hepatic artery, as they pass 
into the liver at the portal fissure. 



198 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

Functions. — To understand the functions of the liver we 
must remember its unique relation to the vascular and diges- 
tive systems, whereby many of the products of gastric and 
intestinal digestion have to traverse it before they reach 
the blood, and some of them as they traverse the liver are 
altered. The liver has several distinct functions, some obvi- 
ous, others not. The liver secretes bile, which is formed by 
the hepatic cells, and leaves by the bile-ducts, to pass into 
the duodenum. Glycogen is also formed in the liver, and 
does not pass into the duct, but, in some altered form, passes 
into the blood-stream, and leaves the liver by the hepatic 
vein. One of its functions, also, is to destroy the hemoglobin 
of the blood; hence the study of the liver materially influences 
our conception of a secreting organ. In this instance we 
have the products of its secretory activity leaving it by two 
different channels, the ducts and the blood-stream. The 
liver, therefore, is a great storehouse of carbo-hydrates, serv- 
ing them out to the economy as they are required, preventing 
the blood from being overcharged with sugar, and, on the 
other hand, it prevents a deficiency of this important body in 
the blood. All this points to the liver as being an organ inti- 
mately related to the general metabolism of the body. In 
a certain period of development it is concerned in the for- 
mation of blood-corpuscles. It has some relation to the 
breaking up of blood-corpuscles and the formation of urea 
"and other metabolic products. Some importance is attrib- 
uted to the' liver in connection with the arrest of certain 
substances absorbed from the alimentary canal, whereby 
they are either destroyed, stored up in the liver, or prevented 
from entering the general circulation in too large an amount. 
It converts the poisonous, odorous products of putrefaction, 
derived from proteids in the intestine, into harmless com- 
pounds, by conjugation with sulphates. 



TEE LITER. 199 

EXPLANATORY. 

We have entered rather minutely into the anatomy and 
physiology of the liver, desiring to call the attention of the 
reader more particularly to its immense double blood-supply 
(which equals, after meals, one-fourth of all the blood in 
the body), and to the fact that it is a great chemical labora- 
tory, placed on the highway by which the great majority 
of material absorbed from the intestines reaches the blood. 
It is, therefore, obviously in a position to act as the guardian 
of the blood's purity, and health ; and the necessity of a free 
and unobstructed circulation to, through, and from this 
organ cannot be overestimated. 

ACUTE LITHEMIA, BILIOUSNESS, OR TORPID LIVER. 
(Excess of uric acid or other metabolic compounds in the 

blood). 

SYMPTOMS. 
Furred tongue; nausea; bitter taste; anorexia; slight 
fever; constipation; headache; stupor; perspiration, alter- 
nating with flashes of heat. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward, 
gently but deeply, the entire length of the spinal column, 
being very particular and thorough in all regions which are 
in the least sensitive to the touch; endeavoring in these 
regions to discover muscles in a contracted, cord-like condi- 
tion, which are obstructing the circulation, and thereby 
affecting nerve-centers which control the alimentary canal. 
Such muscles must be kneaded and manipulated very 
thoroughly. Treat opposite side in a similar manner. 



200 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

2. Place the patient upon the back; the operator 
grasping the shoulders, an assistant now grasps the patient's 
ankles, and a very thorough extension of the spine is given ; 
pull gently at first, gradually stronger, the patient relaxing 
all muscles, for two minutes (cut 23). Care must be exer- 
cised, in giving this extension, to make it no stronger, but 
just as strong as the patient can conveniently stand. This 
thorough extension of the spine relieves the i^ressure uj^on 
the intervertebral fibro-cartilage, thereby relieving, in a 
measure, any undue pressure upon the spinal nerves, and 
also freeing the circulation to the cerebro-spinal cord, any 
obstruction to which means disease in some of its varied 
forms. 

3. Place one hand under the chin, the other under the 
occipital bone (cut 8), and give careful extension of the neck, 
pulling gentlj^ until the body moves, 

4. Place one hand under the chin, and draw the 
head backward, rotating it from side to side; with the disen- 
gaged hand manipulate the muscles immediately over the 
pneumogastric nerve. It is also well to manipulate all 
the muscles of the sides and front of the neck in a very 
thorough and careful manner, as this treatment not only 
frees and stimulates the pneumogastric, but also frees the 
blood-supply to the head. 

5. In all cases where constipation is present, beginning 
at the cecum, manipulate very deeply and gently, following 
the colon its entire length, endeavoring to move any hard- 
ened lump of feces toward the rectum. Manipulate the 
small intestine carefully and thoroughly (cut 17). 

It is also well, in constipation, to knead, as much as pos- 
sible, the gall-bladder, endeavoring to empty its contents 
into the duodenum. 




Cut 23.— Extension of the Spine. 



THE LIVER. 203 

6. Flex the limb against the abdomen strongly; while 
in this position, move the knee three or four times from side 
to side, giving quite strong abduction; extend the leg with 
a light jerk. This treatment stretches the adductor muscles 
of the thigh, thereby freeing the circulation to the leg, and 
assisting to equalize the same. Treat the opposite limb in a 
similar manner. 

7. Place the hand upon the ribs over the liver; press 
gently at first, gradually increasing the strength, until the 
ribs are pressed strongly downward upon the liver; relax 
the pressure gradually. This operation should be repeated 
two or three times each treatment, as it assists very mate- 
rially in stimulating the liver to correctly perform its allot- 
ted task. 

8. Place the fingers of the left hand under the ribs, 
immediately over the liver (cut 25) ; with the left hand grasp 
patient's right wrist and draw the arm strongly above the 
head; at the same instant, with the right hand, raise the ribs 
as much as possible, off of the liver. 

9. Place the hand lightly over the liver; vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) gently two or three minutes. 

10. Place the patient upon a stool; with the thumbs 
close to the spine, at about the second dorsal, have an assist- 
ant raise the arms high above the head, as the patient 
inhales, filling the lungs to their utmost capacity; press hard 
with the thumbs, as the arms are lowered with a backward 
motion, patient permitting the elbows to bend (cut 24). 
Repeat this operation, moving the thumbs downward each 
time to the next lower vertebra, until the eighth dorsal ver- 
tebra is reached. 

This treatment will occupy about twenty minutes, and 
should be given each day. Immediate results can be ex- 



204 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

pected, and a speedy cure will be effected, If tMs treatment is 
given in a correct and careful manner. 

CHRONIC LITHEMIA. 
(May follow acute attacks.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Similar to the acute form with functional disturbance 
of nearly all the organs of the body. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Lithemia (page 199). Treatment to be given 
every other day. A change for the better will be noticed in 
one or two weeks, if the treatments are correctly given, and 
a cure may be looked for in from two to three months. 

ICTERUS, OR JAUNDICE. 

(May be hematogenous, (1) when the function of the liver 
cells have been suppressed, and (2) when the destruction 
of hemoglobin is in excess of the capacity of the liver to 
remove the product of destruction; hepatogenous, when 
there is obstruction of the ducts. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Skin and mucous membranes become yellow^; irritation 
of the skin; discoloration of the secretions; bile absent in the 
feces; slow pulse; irritability and depression of spirits, 
drowsiness and stupidity of mind, advancing with the 
disease. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Lithemia (page 199), being very particular to 
manipulate and vibrate the liver in an exceedingly thorough 
manner. 




Cut 24.— Acute Lithemia. 



THE LITER. 207 

MALIGNANT JAUNDICE, OR ACUTE YELLOW ATROPHY. 

(Acute inflammation of the liver, with necrosis of the cells, 
and bile-pigment in the urine.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Nausea; vomiting; headache; aversion to light; tongue 
dry and coated; diminution of the area of hepatic percus- 
sion; dullness; temperature subnormal at times. 

treatme:nt. 

See Acute Lithemia (page 199). The entire treatment 
should be given in a very thorough, careful manner, every 
other day, being particularly thorough in vibration of the 
liver. 

HEPATIC CONGESTION. 

(Excess of blood in the liver, from obstructed circulation.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Weight, and dull pain in the right hypochondrium; 
tongue coated; anorexia; headache; vertigo; digestion 
impaired; and there may be pain in the right shoulder. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Acute Lithemia (page 199). 

2. Place the hands on the sides of the neck, the fingers 
almost meeting over the spinous processes of the upper cervi- 
cals; tip the head slightly backward, pressing gently with 
the fingers three or our minutes upon the vaso-motor 
(page 253). 

ACUTE HEPATITIS. 
(Inflammation of the liver.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain in the right hypochondrium; appetite impaired; 
nausea; vomiting and febrile symptoms. 



208 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMEXT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; make a careful exami- 
nation of the spine. A very sensitive spot will usually 
be discovered over the origin of the splanchnic nerves in the 
dorsal region, which should be treated in a very thorough 
and careful manner, moving the muscles upward and out- 
ward. It is always well in this disease to treat the entire 
length of the dorsal region, on both sides of the spinous proc- 
esses, after which, placing the finger-tips directly over the 
origin of the splanchnics in the spine, give gentle vibration 
two or three minutes. 

2.' With the patient lying on the back, place the hand 
lightly over the liver; vibrate gently five minutes (pages ^ 
86 and 67). 

3. Place the hands on each side of the neck, fingers 
almost meeting over the spinous processes of the upper cer- 
vicals; press gently with the fingers three or four minutes 
upon the vasomotor (cut 13). 

Treatment should be given each day, and occupy about 
fifteen minutes. 

HEPATIC ABSCESS. 
(Abscess of the liver. Maj- follow acute hepatitis.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pain over the liver, and at the right shoulder; may be 
hiccough, and dyspnea; elevation of temperature; rigors and 
perspiration. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Acute Hepatitis (page 207). 

2. In case of difficult breathing, pressing upon the 
angle of the second rib, upon the right side, with the left hand 
draw the right arm with the right hand with some strength 



THE LITER. "209 

slowly and strongly above the head as the patient inhales ; 
lower the arm with a backward motion, pressing hard at the 
same instant upon the angles of the second rib; place the 
lingers upon the third rib; raise the arm as before; and re- 
peat until the fifth rib is reached. Treat the opposite side 
in a similar manner. 

In the treatment of this disease, a great deal will depend 
ujHiu the good judgment of the operator, who should not only 
apply the above treatments, but should apply such parts 
of the treatment for Acute Lithemia (page 199) as the con- 
ditions necessitate. 

HEPATIC CIEHHOSIS. 

(Inflammation, and thickening of the tissues of the liver; 

usually with atrophy of the organ.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Impairment of nutrition; superficial veins of the abdo- 
men become enlarged; skin clay hue; hemorrhages of the 
nose and stomach. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

HEPATIC FATTY INFILTRATION, OR FATTY LIVER. 

(Accumulation of fat in the liver.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Skin greasy ; diarrhea ; dyspnea ; failure of hepatic func- 
tion. More common with drunkards. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Acute Lithemia. (page 199). omitting Xo. 5. 

2. Place the patient upon a stool; with the knee 
against the back, just below the last dorsal, bend the 
patient backward quite strongly; hold in this position a 
moment; and repeat (see cut 20). 



210 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

3. Place the knee between the scapulse, at about the 
third dorsal; draw the arms slowly but strongly above the 
head as the patient inhales, filling the lungs to their utmost 
capacity (cut 5) ; press hard with the knee as the arms are 
lowered with a backward motion. 

While we cannot hope to effect a cure in this disease, 
the patient often derives much benefit from the above treat- 
ment, careful 1}^ given every other day. 

HEPATIC AMYLOID DEGENEKATION. 

(Starch-like degeneration of the liver. Generally a sequel of 

syphilis.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Enlargement without pain ; face swollen and pallid; im- 
paired digestion; ankles edematous. 
No cure in Osteopathy, 

HEPATIC CARCINOMA. 

(Cancer of the liver.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Loss of fiesh; cachexia (malnutrition and general bad 
health , characterized by a waxy or sallow complexion); 
enlargement of the liver; fluids in the peritoneal cavity; 
deranged digestion; lancinating pains. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

HEPATIC HYDATID CYST. 

(Tumor of the liver, occurring in people who live with dogs.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

A local sensation of weight and dragging; no pain, but 
enlargement of the organ. 




Cut 25.— Raising the False Ribs. 



THE LITER. 213 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the liand ligiitly over the tumor; vibrate for 
fire minutes verr gentlv. 

2. Press the ribs slowh' but strongly down upon the 
liver; slowly relax and repeat the pressure; thus manipulate 
the liver for two or three minutes. 

This treatment frees the circulation and often gives 
relief. 

PERIHEPATITIS. 

(Inflammation of Glisson's capsule.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pain and tenderness in the hepatic region; may be asso- 
ciated with hepatic cirrhosis. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side ; move the muscles up- 
ward and outward, gently but deep, the entire length of the 
dorsal region. Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Place the patient on the back; the hand resting 
lightly over the liver, vibrate (pages 36 and 67) gently for 
five minutes, thus starting the circulation, and thereby 
reducing- the inflammation. '^ 

CHOLECYSTITIS, OR CHOLANGITIS. 

(Inflammation of the gall-bladder.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pain in the right hypochondrium; liver enlarged; heart 
action retarded; tongue coated; itching of the skin; and 
impaired digestion. 



214 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETi:. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Lithemia (page 199). 

Treatment should be given in a very thorough, careful 
manner, particular attention being given the gall-bladder, 
which should be manipulated, and vibrated (pages 36 and 67) 
very carefully. 

BILIARY CALCULI, OR GALL-STONES. 

(Stones in the gall-bladder.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Excruciating colicky pains in the right hypochondrium : 
nausea; shivering; vomiting; face pale; and body covered 
with cold perspiration. 

TREATMENT. 

Very thorough and careful manipulation of the gall- 
bladder will, if persisted in, cause the stones to move forward 
into the duodenum. The treatment should be continued at 
short intervals, until the desired results are obtained. 

Operator must exercise great caution in not continuing 
any one treatment a sufficient length of time to unduly 
exhaust or fatigue the patient, in case the stones do not 
readily move forward. 

CATARRHAL JAUNDICE. 
(Inflammation and obstruction of the gall-duct.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

They are similar to moderate jaundice, usually follow- 
ing an attack of acute gastritis. The onset is attended with 
chill and fever, headache and vomiting. 



TEE LITER. 215 

TREATMENT. 

See treatment for Acute Lithemia (page 199), which 
should be given in a very careful manner, particular atten- 
tion being given to manipulating the liver and gall-bladder. 

HEPATIC COLIC. 
(Pain in the hepatic region, due to passage of gall-stones.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Attack may be sudden, -^ith pains along the margin 
of the ribs on the right side and right shoulder; patient 
becomes doubled up in agony; pulse rapid; retching and 
vomiting; profuse perspiration after paroxysms. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Lithemia (page 199). 

In applying this treatment particular attention should 
be given to thorough manipulation and vibration (pages 3G 
and 67) of the liver and gall-bladder. 



216 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 



Diseases of the Pancreas. 



THE PANCEEAS. 

The pancreas is a long, narrow, compound racemose 
gland of a cream color and soft texture, which lies across the 
posterior wall of the abdomen, behind the stomach, and 
opposite the first lumbar vertebra. It is about seven inches 
long; its structure resembles that of the salivary glands. 

The broader end, or head, lies in and is embraced by the 
curvature of the duodenum; and the narrow end, or tail, is in 
contact with the spleen. 

Capsule. — The gland has a thin connective-tissue cap- 
sule, which sends a fine process and septa between its lob- 
ules, and these septa carry into it the blood-vessels and 
nerves. 

Ducts. — The duct of Wirsung runs along the whole 
length of the gland, and in its course it receives nearly at 
right angles contributory small ducts from the different lob- 
ules of the gland. It opens with the common bile-duct, pierc- 
ing the coat of the latter obliquely. In man there is a small 
accessory duct opening independently into the duodenum. 

The duct consists of connective tissue, and is lined by a 
single layer of non-striated columnar or cylindrical cells. 
When traced backward, the ducts open into intermediate or 
intercalary parts lined by flattened epithelium, while the 
intercalary parts open into the acini. 

Condition of Blood-Vessels. — During secretion the blood- 
vessels behave like the blood-vessels of the salivary glands 
after stimulation of the chorda tympani. They dilate, and 



THE PANCREAS. 217 

the Tenons blood is bright red; thus it is probable that a 
similar nervous mechanism exists. 

Nerves. — The nerves arise from the hepatic, splenic, and 
superior mesenteric plexuses, together with branches from 
the vagus and sympathetic. The secretion is excited by 
stimulation of the medulla oblongata, as well as by direct 
stimulation of the gland itself. It is not arrested by section 
of the cervical spinal cord. The secretion is suppressed by 
atropin (in the dog, but not in the rabbit), by producing vom- 
iting, by stimulation of the central end of the vagus, as well 
as stimulation of other sensory nerves. Extirpation of the 
nerves accompanying the blood-vessels prevents the above 
named stimuli from acting. Under these circumstances a 
thin paralytic secretion, with feeble digestive powers, is 
formed, but its amount is not influenced by the taking of 
food. 

Secretion. — As in other glands, we distinguish a quies- 
cent stage, during which the gland is soft and pale, and a 
stage of secretoiw activity, during which the organ swells up 
and appears a pale red. The latter condition only occurs 
after a meal, and is caused, probably, reflexly, owing to stim- 
ulation of the nerves of the stomach and duodenum. The 
secretion begins to flow when food is introduced into the 
stomach, and reaches its maximum in two or three hours 
thereafter. The amount falls toward the fifth or seventh 
hour, and rises again, owing to the entrance of the chyme into 
the duodenum, toward the ninth and eleventh hour, gradu- 
ally falling toward the seventeenth to the twenty-fourth 
hour, until it ceases completely. When more food is taken, 
the same process is repeated. As a general rule, a rapidly 
formed secretion contains less solids than one formed slowly. 



218 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ACUTE PANCREATITIS. 

(Inflammation of the pancreas.) 
SYMPTOMS. 
Pain and tenderness in the epigastric region; colicky, 
and shooting pains to the back of the shoulder; thirst; 
anorexia; and other symptoms similar to Peritonitis. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. With the patient lying upon the side; operator 
places his hands upon the upper cervicals, moving the mus- 
cles upward and ■ outward, gently but deeply, the entire 
length of' the spinal column, being very thorougn in all 
regions which seem sensitive to the touch, or where the 
temperature is abnormal. Treat the opposite side in a simi- 
lar manner. 

2. Place one hand under the chin, the other under the 
occipital; give strong extension, continued for one minute, 
using sufficient strength to move the patient's body slightly; 
manipulate carefully and thoroughly all the muscles of the 
neck. 

.3. Knead the bowels gently for a few moments, thus 
starting the circulation. 

In case of constipation, very thorough Constipation 
Treatment (page 150) should be given. 

4. Place the hand lightly over the pancreas, vibrating 
(pages .36 and 67) gently four or five minutes, thus freeing 
the circulation of the pancreas, and thereby reducing the 
inflammation. 

5. Draw the arms slowly but strongly above the 
head, an assistant holding the patient's feet, giving rather 
strong extension for one minute. This treatment, it will be 
observed, stretches and moves the parts immediately over 




Cut 26. — The Pancreas and Duodenum. 



THE PAlsCREAS. 22 L 

and around the pancreas, and very often gives immediate 
relief. 

0. Place tlie hands upon the sides of the neck, fingers 
almost meeting over the upper cervicals; press gently three 
or four minutes (cut 13). 

This treatment should be given every other day, and 
occupy about fifteen minutes. Immediate relief will be 
experienced, and, if given correctly, a speedy cure may be 
expected. 

SUPPURATIVE PANCREATITIS. 
(Inflammation of the pancreas, with suppuration.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Emaciation; exhaustion; constipation; irregular fever; 
pain in the epigastrium; and evidence of tumor above the 
umbilicus. 

TREATMENT. 
See Acute Pancreatitis (page 218). 

PANCREATIC CYST. 

(Tumor in the pancreatic duct, due to impaction of calculi 

in the duct.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Appearance of a tumor in the upper abdomen. May 
simulate ovarian tumor; sense of weight and fullness in the 
epigastrium; complexion yellow; tumor smooth, soft, and 
fluctuating. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Pancreatitis (page 218). 
Treatment should be given every other day. 



222 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 



Diseases of the Spleen. 



THE SPLEEN. 

The spleen is the largest and most important ductless 
gland. It is undoubtedly related to the vascular system, yet 
its anatomical relations to the stomach and physiological 
relations to the liver may allow it to be described as an acces- 
sory to the digestive tract. It is placed deep in the left 
hypochondrium, between the fundus of the stomach and the 
diaphragm, above the descending colon. There is usually 
but one s]>leen, jet observation shows it may be congenitally 
lacking, or may be multiple, as many as twenty-three having 
been found in one body. These are called accessory or super- 
numerary spleens, and are probably occasioned by the deep 
notching of the anterior margin and separation of the 
included parts. They may be connected with the mother 
organ by thin bridges of splenic tissue, or only by a portion 
of capsule. They are usually wholly isolated, and situated 
in the gastro-splenic omentum, great omentum, transverse 
mesocolon, or in the pancreas on a branch of the splenic 
artery ; frequently one or two are in the region of the hilus. 
They are the size of a hazel-nut, red, to almost black, in color, 
and of a rounded form. The spleen varies more in volume 
than any other organ, being relatively well developed in 
children, and atrophied in old age. It varies with the same 
individual, with sex. degree of fullness of the portal vein, 
state of health, or disease, and with the influence of certain 
drugs. It is hypertrophied in all infectious diseases. It may 
be so large as to reach the pelvis, and weigh many pounds. 



TEE SPLEEy. 223 

The spleen is situated, under cover of the ribs, on the left 
side, being separated from them by the diaphragm, and 
above by a small portion of the lower margin of the left lung. 
Its position corresponds to the ninth, tenth, and eleventh 
ribs. 

Blood- Vessels. — Tlie splenic artery arises from the celiac 
axis, and is large and tortuous, dividing at the hilum 
into five or six branches, each supplying a segment of the 
organ, and terminating either in the venous radicles or in 
the lacunar spaces. 

The splenic vein arises by radicles, partly from the capil- 
lary, partly from the lacunar spaces, and empties into 
the portal vein. 

Nerves. — The splenic nerves are derived from the semilu- 
nar ganglion of the solar plexus and the right pneumogastric, 
forming the splenic plexus. 

Function. — Leading authorities regard the spleen as a 
prominent source of white blood-corpuscles, which seems to 
be proven by the enormous number of them found in the 
blood in cases of leucocythemia as well as by the fact that 
they are more numerous in the region of the spleen than in 
any other part of the body. Tt is a very vascular organ, 
capable of very great distension, and becomes, in a passive 
Avay, a sort of safety-valve in relieving the portal system. It 
is also regarded as an organ in which many of the red blood- 
corpuscles undergo degeneration when their usefulness is 
impaired. 

SPLENITIS. 
(Inflammation of the spleen.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Nausea; vomiting; aggravated respiration; elevation 
of temperature: pain and tenderness in the left hypochon- 
drium. 



224 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upjjer dorsal, mos^e the muscles upward and outward, gently 
but very deep, the entire length of the dorsal region, being 
very thorough where any tenderness or abnormal tempera- 
ture is discovered. Treat the opposite side in a similar 
juauuer. 

2. Place the patient on a stool; the thumb of the right 
hand on the angle of the eighth rib, with the left hand draw 
the right arm slowly but ^ery strongly above the head, 
pressing hard upon the angle of the rib as the arm is lowered 
with a backward motion; place the thumb upon the angle of 
the next lower rib; raise the arm; and repeat, until the 
eleventh rib has been treated in a similar manner (cut 27). 
This portion of the treatment usually gives immediate relief. 

3. Place the patient on the back; with the hand rest- 
ing lightly over the spleen, vibrate (pages 36 and 67) gently 
three or four minutes. 

■i. Place the hands on the sides of the neck, fingers 
almost m.eeting over the upper cervicals; press gently three 
or four minutes upon the vasomotor (page 253) to reduce the 
fever. 

This treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and 
should be given each day. 

SPLENIC HYPERTROPHY. 

(Enlargement of the spleen. May occur as the result of 
blood diseases.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Fever; weakness; diarrhea; disposition to hemor- 
rhages ; pain in the splenic region, which may extend to the 
left shoulder. 



TEE SPLEEX. 225 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Splenitis (page 224). 

2. Flex tlie limb strongly against the abdomen, ab- 
ducting the knee strongly as it is extended with a light 
jerk; repeat two or three times; treat the opposite limb in 
a similar manner. This treatment stretches the abductor 
muscles of the thigh, and thereby starts the circulation to the 
limb. 

3. Place one hand under the chin, the other under the 
occipital, and give thorough extension of the neck; also 
jnanipulate the front and sides of the neck thoroughly, thus 
freeing the circulation to the head. 

4. Place the patient upon a stool ; bend strongly back- 
wards over the operator's knee, the knee being placed 
against the spine just below the last rib: hold in this posi- 
tion a moment and repeat. This last treatment will almost 
invariably check the diarrhea in a very few days. 

This treatment will occupy from twenty to twenty-five 
ininutes, and should be given every other day until recovery. 

SPLENIC HYDATID CYST. 

iTumor of the spleen). 

SYMPTOMS. 
When large enough to permit palpation, fluctuation may 
be detected, and characteristic cystic fluid may be with- 
drawn by aspiration. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon the right side; place the 
fingers of the right hand as far as possible under the ribs 
immediately over the spleen; with the left hand draw 
patient's left arm above the head, at the same instant, with 

—15— 



226 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the right hand, raising the ribs as much as possible from the 
spleen. This treatment usually gives immediate relief. 

2. Place the hand lightly over the spleen, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) or five minutes. 

Treatment should be given every other day. 

FLOATING SPLEEN. 

(Mobility of the organ, due to relaxation of its attachments.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

The absence of the organ from its usual position. The 
presence of a solid body in an unusual position. 

TREATMENT. 

1. A thorough Treatment to Equalize the Circulation 
(page 114) will nourish and strengthen the attachments of 
the spleen, thereby enabling them to hold the organ in place. 

2. After each treatment for the circulation, the opera- 
tor should endeavor, by any manipulation which seems most 
suitable to the case, to move the organ toward its normal 
position. 

Treatment should be given everv other dav. 




Cut 27.— Raising the Eighth Rib. 



TEE KIDNEYS. 229 



Diseases of the Kidneys. 



THE KIDNEYS. 

The kidneys are two in number, situated in tlie back 
part of the abdomen, and are for the purpose of separating 
from the blood materials which, when dissolved in a quantity 
of water, also separated by the kidneys from the blood, con- 
stitute the urine. 

They are situated one on each side of the vertebral 
column, behind the peritoneum, surrounded by a mass of fat 
and loose areolar tissue. 

Their upper extremity is on a level with the upper 
border of the last dorsal vertebra, and their lower extremity 
is on a level with the third lumbar. The right kidney is 
usually a little lower than the left, probably on account of 
the vicinity of the liver. 

The kidney is flattened, and presents, at one part of 
its circumference, a hollow. It is larger at its upper than 
at its lower extremity. 

Each kidney is about four inches in length, two to two 
and a half in breadth, and a little more than one inch in 
thickness. The right is somewhat shorter, though some- 
what broader, than the left. 

The weight of the kidney in the adult male varies from 
four and a half to six ounces. In the adult female, from 
four to five and a half ounces. 

Eelations.- — Their posterior surface is in relation with 
the crns of the diaphragm, the eleventh and twelfth ribs, and 
the quadratus lumbonim and psoas magnus muscles. The 



230 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

right is covered in front by the right lobe of the liver, the 
descending portion of the duodenum, and the beginning of 
the transverse colon. The left lies behind the fundus of the 
stomach, the tail of the pancreas, and the upper part of the 
descending colon. 

At the hilum of the kidney the relative position of the 
main structures passing into and out of the organ is as fol- 
lows: The vein is in front, the artery in the middle, and the 
duct or urethra behind and toward the lower part. (By a 
knowledge of these relations a student may distinguish 
between the right and left kidneys.) 

Blood-Vessels. — Considering the size of the kidney, it 
is most abundantly supplied with blood. The renal artery, 
arising from the abdominal aorta, divides into four or five 
branches, which pass into the kidney at the hilum. These 
branches, surrounded by connective tissue continuous with 
that of the capsule, continue to divide, and pass between the 
papillae to reach the bases of the pjramid on the limit 
between the cortical and boundary zones, where they form 
incomplete arches. From these horizontal trunks, the inter- 
lobular or radiate arteries run vertically and singly into the 
cortex, between each two medullary rays, and in their course 
they give off on all sides the short undivided vasa affereutia, 
each of which enters a jMalpighian capsule at the opposite 
pole from which the urinary tubule is given off. 

Nerves. — The nerves of the kidney, although small, are 
about 15 in number. They have small ganglia developed 
upon them, and are derived from the renal plexus, which 
is formed by branches from the solar plexus, and lower and 
outer part of the semilunar ganglion, and aortic plexus, and 
from the lesser and smaller splanchnic nerves. They com- 
municate with the spermatic plexus, a circumstance which 



THE KIDNEYS. 231 

may explain the occurrence of pain in the testicle in diseases 
of the kidneys. They accompany the renal artery and its 
branches, but their exact mode of termination is not known. 

Nerve-Infliience on the Kidneys. — With regard to the 
influence exerted by the nervous system on the renal secre- 
tion, there can be little doubt that here, as in other glands, 
the process is under the control of the nerves. Many of the 
conditions which cause increased secretion have no effect 
upon the general blood-pressure, so that if the increased flow 
be brought about by the vaso-motor mechanism, it must be 
by means of nervous channels altering the blood-flow in the 
special arteries of the glands. In some emotional condi- 
tions, such as hysteria, an unaccountably great amount of 
urine of very low specific gravity is evacuated. 

The principal renal vaso-motor fibers leave the spinal 
cord by the anterior roots of the tenth, eleventh, and twelfth 
dorsal nerves. 

In regard to the effects of the vaso-motor nerves, we 
know that section of all the nervous twigs going to the kid- 
neys causes great congestion and an immense increase in 
the secretion. This undoubtedly depends upon the sudden 
rise in pressure in the glomeruli owing to the dilatation of 
the arteries. 

If the great splanchnics, in which also are renal vaso- 
motor fibers, be cut, in addition to the lesser and smallest 
splanchnics, a great quantity of urine is produced from the 
vaso-motor paralysis, but. on account of the large area of 
vessels injured, the general blood-pressure falls; and the 
effect, therefore, is not so marked. If, on the contrary, the 
lesser and smallest splanchnic nerves be stimulated, the 
secretion is diminished, owing to the contraction of the 
renal arteries. Section also of the spinal cord at the 



232 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

seventh cervical vertebra stops the flow, because it reduces 
the general blood-pressure below that necessary for the 
secretion of urine. 

EXPLANATORY. 

We desire to call the attention of the reader particu- 
larly to the large blood-supply of the kidneys, and the impor- 
tant duty which these organs are called upon to perform in 
separating the urine from the blood. With poor circulation, 
and the blood in a stagnant, diseased condition, it is obvious 
that the kidneys are laboring under a disadvantage, and 
must in time feel the effects of this extra effort; hence, in 
all kidney diseases, the first duty of the osteopath is to free 
the entire circulation; neither can we hope to have healthy 
kidneys for any length of time if the liver is in an abnormal 
condition; it is, therefore, advisable to look well to that 
organ, giving such treatment, if it is found diseased, as con- 
ditions would indicate. The nerves, also, play an important 
part, and we have no reason to hope for healthy kidneys if 
certain regions in the spinal column are in a sensitive or a 
congested condition. 

So many complications are liable to arise in diseases 
of the kidneys that the results obtained from osteopathic 
treatment will depend largely upon the good judgment of 
the operator in making a correct diagnosis, and applying, 
in all cases, such accessory treatments for complicalions 
arising in individual cases as the conditions indicate. 

ANURY, ANURIA, ANURESIS, OR RENAL INADEQUACY. 

(Deficiency of the urine; of low specific gravity, containing 
but little urea, and neither albumin nor casts.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon the face; beginning at the 
eighth dorsal vertebra, with one thumb on each side of the 



THE KIDXET8. 233 

spine, between tlie eighth and ninth vertebrae, press 
strongly a few seconds; with the thumbs between the ninth 
and tenth, repeat the operation; work in this manner be- 
tween each successive vertebra, until the first lumbar is 
reached. 

2. Place the patient on the back, with the knees 
slightlv flexed, thus lessening the tension on the abdominal 
muscles; place the hands over the kidneys, the patient being- 
required to make several strong expirations; with each sue- 
ceeding expiration we come closer to the kidneys, until at 
last they are easily felt. The patient will now make thoracic 
respiration, that the manipulation of the kidneys may not be 
interfered with. Knead the kidneys gently but thoroughly, 
from without inward and slightly from above downvrard, 
that the pressure may be applied in the direction of the 
venous circulation and large number of renal canals. This 
treatment should be given in a very thorough manner, as 
it asists largely in exciting the kidneys to renewed action. 

3. Place the hand over the kidney, and vibrate (pages 
36 and 67) gently for two minutes over each kidney. 

While the above treatment is very beneficial in stimu- 
lating the kidneys to greater activity, it is very often neces- 
sary to give Genera] Treatment (page 306) or such part there- 
of as may. in the judgment of the operator, be deemed 
essential 

Treatment should occupy about fifteen or twenty min- 
utes, and be given every other day. 

ALBUMINURIA. 

(Albumin in the urine, generally from defective action of 

the secretory tubes of the kidneys; detected by heating.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Exudative and Productive Nephritis (page 

239). 



234 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CHYLURIA. 

(A discharge of milky urine, without apparent derangement 
of the kidneys or bladder, there being chyle in the urine, 
from communication between the lymphatic system and 
the genito-urinary tract; detected by microscope.) 

TEEATMENT. 

Xot treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

HEMATURIA. 

(Hemorrhages from the mucous membrane of the urinary 
passages. Blood in the urine. Small quantity and 
uniform admixture with the urine points to renal hem- 
orrhages. Pure blood or clots mixed with the urine at 
the beginning or close of urination points to bladder or 
urethral hemorrhage.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the face; with the thumbs of 
the operator upon each side of the spine, beginning at the 
eighth dorsal, pressing hard with the thumbs, move the mus- 
cles upward and outward; move the thumbs down to the 
next dorsal, and repeat until the second sacral A^ertebra is 
reached. 

2. Place the patient upon a stool; the thumbs of the 
operator upon the angles of the second ribs, an asistant 
standing in front, raising the arms slowly, strongly, high 
above the head ; press hard with the thumbs while the arms 
are lowered with a backward motion. Treat in this man^ 
ner until the eighth ribs are reached. 

3. Place the patient upon the back; one operator 
grasping the shoulders, another the feet, give thorough ex- 
tension of spine. 



THE EIDXEYS. 235 

4. Place the hand lightly over the kidney, and give 
thorough vibration (pages 36 and 67) three or four minutes. 
Treat the opposite kidney in a similar manner. 

In case of other complications, see General Ti-eatment 
(page 306). applying such portions thereof as will meet the 
conditions. 

HEMOGLOBINURIA. 
(Hemoglobin in the urine. Urine dark-red or chocolate- 
brown, high specific gravity, contains albumin, and tew 
or no blood-cells.) 

TEEATMENT. 
See Hematuria ('page 234). 

LIPURIA. 

(Fat in the urine. May occur in health after excessive 
ingestion of fatty food; detected by adding potassium 
hydrate and shaking with ether.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward very 
deeply the entire length of the spinal column, being very 
thorough over the splanchnic nerves, as it is here we will 
find conditions which are causing an obstruction to the nerve- 
wave, thereby interfering with their control of the digestive 
mechanism of the stomach, pancreas, and liver. Thorough 
treatment of these nerves stimulates them to greater activity. 

2. Place the patient on the back ; with one hand under 
the chin, draw the head backward and to the side; with the 
disengaged hand manipulate the muscles thoroughly and 
deeply over the pneumogastric, thus freeing and stimulat- 
ing this nerve to great activity. 



236 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

3. Place the hands over the stomach, vibrating (pages 
36 and 67) gently two minutes. Vibrate the pancreas, liver, 
and kidneys in a similar manner. 

This treatment will occupy about fifteen or twenty min- 
utes, and should be given every other day. 

During the course of this treatment, the patient should 
be confined strictly to a fruit and vegetable diet, 

PYURIA. 

(Pus in the urine. From suppuration in any portion of the 
genito-urinary tract; detected by microscope.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the face; beginning at the 
last dorsal vertebra, with the thumbs on each side and close 
to the spinal column, move the muscles upward and outward 
gently, but very deep, being particular to treat thoroughly 
between the last lumbar and first sacral vertebra. 

2. Place the patient upon the back, with one hip and 
limb off the edge of the table; place one hand upon the knee, 
the other under the great trochanter, pressing downward 
strongly upon the knee, at the same instant lifting upon the 
great trochanter. This treatment stretches the muscles 
through which passes a large portion of the urinary tract, 
thereby freeing the circulation in this immediate region. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

3. The kidneys and the entire urinary tract should be 
manipulated in a very thorough and careful manner. 

Treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and should 
be given everv other da v. 



THE KIDNEYS. 237 

OXALURIA. 

(Calcium oxalate in the urine. From insufficient activity 
of tlie stage whicli should change oxalic acid into 
carbonic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Dull pain in the loins; boils or carbuncles; specific grav- 
ity of urine increased, and contains an excess of urea and 
oxalates. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon the back; grasping both 
knees, flex the limbs slowly but very strongly against the 
abdomen; with the knees in this position, press as hard as 
the patient can stand without too much pain, at the same 
time moving the limbs gently from side to side. 

2. Flex one limb strongly, upon the chest, giving it 
strong abduction, and extending with a light jerk. Treat 
the opposite limb in a similar manner. 

3. Knead the kidneys carefully and thoroughly. 

4. Place the hand over the liver, vibrating (pages 36 
and 67) gently three or four minutes; also vibrate over the 
kidneys. 

Treatment should occupy about ten or fifteen minutes, 
and be given every other day. 

UREMIA. 
(Toxic condition of the blood from accumulation of urea. 
Due to retention of poisonous materials which should be 
eliminated by the kidneys.) . 

SYMPTOMS. 

Headache; nausea; vertigo; vomiting; dilatation of the 
pupils; delirium; convulsions; and coma. 



238 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon the side; beginning at the 
eightli dorsal, move the muscles upward and outward to the 
last lumbar vertebra, being very particular over the lesser 
splanchnic nerves to manipulate deeply, as it is here we are 
very apt to discover conditions which are the real cause of 
the failure of the kidneys to properly perform their duties. 

2. Place the patient on the back; and knead the kid- 
neys carefully and thoroughly; also give vibrations (pages 
36 and 67). 

It is often advisable in this disease, in addition to the 
above treatment, to give a thorough Treatment to Equalize 
the Circulation (page 114), 

Treatment will occupy about tw^enty or twenty-five min- 
utes, and should be given each day. 

RENAL CONGESTION. 

(Excess of blood in the kidneys.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Amount of urine diminished, and of high specific grav- 
ity, 1020 to 1030, dark, and only small amounts passed at 
frequent intervals; uric acid increased, small amount of 
alumbin, hyaline casts, and few red blood-cells. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
eighth dorsal, move the muscles upward and outward, very 
deep, to the end of the sacrum, thus freeing and stimulating 
the nerves which assist in controlling the kidneys. Treat 
the opposite side in a similar manner. 

3. Place the patient face downward; the operator 
pressing very hard upon the sacrum, as an assistant raises 



THE KIDXEYS. 239 

the limbs, slowly, as high as the patient can bear without 
great ineonveuieuce, holding them in this position a moment, 
also moving them gently from side to side; lower the limbs; 
and repeat, this time, if possible, raising the limbs a little 
higher. 

3. Place the hand lightly over the kidney, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) gently tw'O or three minutes. Treat the 
opposite side in a similar manner. 

Treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and 
should be given each day, until recovery. 

ACUTE EXUDATIVE AND PRODUCTIVE NEPHRITIS, OR 
ACUTE BRIGHT'S DISEASE. 

(Inflammation of the kidneys, with exudation of plasma, red 
and white blood-cells; excessive growth of capsule-cells 
in the glomeruli; and overgrowth of connective tissue.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
May commence with a chill, followed by fever; pain in 
the loins; headache; eyelids puffy; extremities dropsical; 
diminished exretion ; micturition frequent ; urine smoky and 
reddish, specific gravity high, deficient in urea, contains 
albumin, hyaline, and blood-casts. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Patient lying face downward; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, with the thumbs on each side of and close 
to the spinous processes, pressing rather hard, move the 
muscles upward and outward the entire length of the spinal 
column, being very thorough in the lower dorsal and lumbar 
regions. 

2. Place the patient on the back; the oi)erator grasp- 
ing the patient's shoulders, while an asistant, grasping the 



240 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ankles, assists in giving thorougli and strong extension, 
which should be continued one minute. 

3. Place the patient close to the edge of the table, 
the limb and hip lying oyer the side; place one hand upon 
the knee, the other under the trochanter; while lifting 
strongly upon the trochanter with one hand, with the other 
press the limb as far downward as possible, holding it a few 
seconds in this position. Treat the opposite limb in a similar 
manner. 

4. Place the hand lightly over the kiney. and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 07) gently two minutes. Treat the opposite 
kidney in a similar manner. 

5. Flex the limb strongly against the chest, while 
in this position moving it slowly from side to side; give the 
knee strong abduction, extending with a light jerk. Treat 
the opposite limb in a similar manner. 

6. Place one hand on each side of the thigh, and move 
all the flesh gently but very deep from side to side the entire 
length of the limb. This and the above treatment frees the 
circulation to the limb, and will immediately relieve its drop- 
sical condition. 

7. Knead and manij^ulate the bowels carefully but 
deeply. 

Treat twenty minutes each day, till a cure is effected. 

CHRONIC EXUDATIVE AND PRODUCTIVE NEPHRITIS, 

OR CHRONIC BRIGHT'S DISEASE. 

(May follow acute attacks. And develops in the course of 

syphilis, endorcarditis, tuberculosis, or bone diseases.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Development slow. Dropsy; skin pasty in color; sclerot- 
ies very white; headache; insomnia; dyspnea; nausea; vom- 



THE KIDXETS. 241 

iting; urine deficient in urea and specific gravity; excess of 
albumin; casts abundant, both epithelial, fatty, and granu- 
lar; few red blood-cells. More common in males. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Exudative and Productive Nephritis (page 239). 

2. Manipulate and. vibrate (see Acute Lithemia, 7, 8, 
and 9, page 199) the liver in a very thorough manner. 

3. Place the patient upon a stool; the knee of the 
operator between the scapula^ of the patient, grasp the 
wrists and draw the arms slowly but strongly above the 
head as the patient inhales (cut 5), pressing hard with the 
knee as the arms are lowered with a backward motion. 

Treatment should be given every other day, and occupy 
about twenty or twenty-five minutes. 

Patients suffering with this disease are very often bene- 
fited and occasionally cured by the above treatment. 

DIABETES INSIPIDUS, OR POLYURIA. 

(Excessive quantity of urine of low specific gravity.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Urine pale and of low specific gravity, 1001 to 1005- 
Patient usually well nourished. Generally secondary to 
some disease of the brain or abdomen. More common in 
young males. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon the side; beginning at the 
first cervical, move the muscles upward and outward, care- 
f ally but very deep, the entire length of the spinal column. 
Be very thorough from the ninth dorsal vertebra to the 
second lumbar. Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Place the left hand upon the sarcum, just below 

—16- 



242 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the last lumbar; with the right beneath the knees of the 
patient, the limbs should now be drawn toward the operator, 
upon a level with the table, after which they should be raised 
as far as the patient can stand without too much inconveni- 
ence, the operator pressing, at the same instant, very hard 
upon the sacrum; move the limbs until they are on a line 
with the body, and lower to the table (cut 31). Repeat this 
operation two or three times, raising the limbs a little 
higher with each succeeding operation. 

3. Place the hand over the kidney, and vibrate (pages 
36 and 67) for two minutes. 

The above treatment acts directly upon the nerves, and, 
if given correctly, will immediately check the excessive 
flow of urine. 

In case the disease is secondary to brain or abdominal 
troubles, it, of course, will be necessary to give such acces- 
sory treatment as the conditions indicate. 

DIABETES MELLITTJS, OR GLYCOSTJEIA. 

(Excessive quantity of urine containing sugar.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Urine pale, of high specific gravity, 1025 to 1045, acid 
reaction, and contains sugar; hunger; emaciation; muscular 
weakness ; and loss of sexual power. 

TREATMENT. 

See Diabetes Insipidus (page 241). 

This disease is very often benefited by the above treat- 
ment, using such other accessory treatment as the condition 
of the patient and judgment of the operator would indicate. 




Cut 28. — Diabetes Insipidus. 



TEE KIDXETS. 245 

PAROXYSMAL HEMOGLOBINURIA. 
(Hemoglobin in the urine, accompanied by paroxysms.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Languor; fatigue; feeling of chilliness; fingers, toes, and 
ears become numb, cold, and cyanotic. More common in 
young adult males. 

TKEATMENT. 

In the treatment of this disease it is necessary to stimu- 
late the nerves controlling the entire digestive tract, particu- 
larly the nerves of nutrition, vrhich can be stimulated by 
thorough treatment in the upper dorsal region. It is also 
essential to expand the chest, thus stimulating the lungs to 
greater activity, and also freeing the circulation to these 
organs. The liver, pancreas, and kidneys must also be 
treated, with a view of equalizing and stimulating their 
action. 

1. Place the patient upon the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward very 
deeply the entire length of the spinal column, being very 
thorough in all regions which appear at all sensitive to the 
touch, or in which the temperature is abnormal. Treat the 
opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Place the hand under the chin, drawing the head 
backward and to the side; with the disengaged hand manipu- 
late the muscles immediately over the pneumogastric nerve. 
Treat the opposite side of the neck in a similar manner. 

3. Vibrate (pages 36 and 07) one minute over each of 
the following organs: the lungs, stomach, liver, pancreas, 
and kidneys. 

4. Place the patient upon a stool; the knee of the 
operator between the scapulae at about the second dorsal, 



246 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

draw the patient's arms strongly above the head, as the lungs 
are filled to their fullest capacity (cut 5) ; press hard with the 
knee as the arms are lowered with a backward motion. 

This treatment will occupy about fifteen or twenty min- 
utes, and should be given every other day. 

PYELITIS. 
(Inflammation of the pelvis of the kidney.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pain in the lumbar region; urine acid reaction; sedi- 
ment, principally pus, but may contain blood. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on his side; beginning at the last 
dorsal, move the muscles upward and outward, gently but 
very deep, the entire length of the lumbar and upper sacral 
region. Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. This 
treatment, if correctly applied, will remove almost immedi- 
ately the pain in the lumbar region. 

2. Manipulate the kidneys and entire urinary tract 
gently, but as thoroughly as possible. 

3. With the patient lying upon the side, place one 
hand against the sacrum, with the other grasping the knee; 
draw the limb strongly backward, pressing hard at the same 
instant upon the sacrum. 

4. Place the hand lightly over the kidney, vibrating 
(pages 36 and 67) one minute. Treat the opposite kidney in a 
similar manner 

Treatment should be given each day, and occupy about 
ten minutes. 



THE KIDNEYS. 247 

RENAL CALCULUS. OR NEPHROLITHIASIS. 

(Stone in the pelvis of the kidney.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Constant dull pain in the lumbar region ; following par- 
oxysms, urine may contain blood; if calculus enters ureter, 
there is excruciating pain in its course; numbness of the 
thigh; nausea and Tomiting. 

TEEATMEXT. 

1. Place the patient on the back, the operator's hands 
immediately over the kidneys; the patient will now be 
required to exhale several times very deeply; with each 
exhalation the hands are brought nearer the kidneys, until at 
last they can be felt very distinctly; patient will now make 
thoracic respiration, that the process of kneading the kid- 
neys may not be interfered with. 

In manipulating the kidney, great care must be exer- 
cised in endeavoring to move the stone towards its natural 
point of exit. 

2. Place the hand over the kidney, and vibrate (pages 
36 and G7) gently two or three minutes. 

8. Place the patient on the face; the operator's 
thumbs upon each side and close to the spine, beginning at 
the ninth dorsal vertebra, move the muscles upward and out- 
ward, gently but very deeply, to the. first sacral, being very 
thorough the entire length of the lumbar region. 

Treatment should be given at short intervals, until the 
desired results are obtained. 

HYDRONEPHROSIS. 
(Dropsy of the kidneys, due to obstruction.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Dull pain, with sense of fullness; periodical discharges 



248 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

of large quantities of urine, as the obstruction is temporarily 
removed; rigo^; sweat; and emaciation, 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper dorsal vertebra, move the muscles upward and out- 
ward the entire length of the spinal column, being very 
thorough in the splanchnic and lumbar region. Treat the 
opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Place the patient on the face; operator placing one 
hand upon the sacrum, the other beneath the knees, raise 
the limbs strongly, pressing at the same instant very hard 
upon the sacrum. 

3. Place the hand lightly over the kidneys, vibrating 
(pages 36 and 67) each kidney two minutes. 

4. Place the patient upon a stool; the operator places 
his thumbs upon the angles of the second ribs, an assistant 
raising the arms strongly above the head as the patient 
inhales ; press hard -with the thumbs as the arms are lowered 
with a backward motion; place the thumbs on the angles of 
the third r-ibs; raise the arms as before, and repeat until the 
lower borders of the scapulas are reached. 

This treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and 
should be given each day. 

CHRONIC INTERSTITIAL NEPHRITIS. 

(Overgrowth of connective tissue, with atrophy of the epi- 
thelium and tubules. Due to lead poison, gout, or 
alcoholism.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Urine increased and of low specific gravity; frequent 
micturition ; diarrhea ; shortness of breath ; arterial tension 
high; and hypertophy of the heart. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 



THE EIDXETS. 249 

KENAL AMYLOID DEGENERATION, OR WAXY LIVER. 

(Starch-like degeneration of the renal capillaries.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Albuminuria; edema; diarrhea; waxy complexion; 
urine pale, and specific gTavity 1008 to 1014, containing 
liyaline casts and white blood-cells. 
No cure in Osteopathy. ' 

RENAL TUBERCULOSIS. 

(Consumption of the kidney, vrith specific bacillus.) 

SY^MPTOMS. 

As a rule, other organs of the body are involved. Urine 
generally contains pus and waste matter and tubercle bacilli; 
emaciation; and exhaustive perspiration. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

RENAL CARCINOMA. 
(Cancer of the kidney.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Hematuria, and development of tumor; dull exacer- 
bating pain in the lumbar region; anorexia: emaciation; 
cachexia; and edema of the lower extremities. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

RENAL HYDATID CYST. 
(Tumor of the kidney.) 

SY^MPTOMS. 

Fluctuating tumor in the loin or lateral region. Pecu- 
liar thrill on percussion. 



250 ■ OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place patient on the back; flexing the limb corre- 
sponding to the diseased kidney slowly, genth^, gradually 
increasing the force used, as far as possible upon the abdo- 
men ; abduct the knee strongly as the limb is extended. 

2. Place the patient in such position that the limb 
will hang over the edge of the table; placing one hand under 
the trochanter, with the other press the limb gently down- 
ward, being very careful not to cause much pain; raise the 
limb carefully, and again press it downward, this time a little 
further, if possible, than before. 

3. Place the hand over the tumor, and vibrate (pages 
36 and 67) two minutes. 

Treatment will occupy about ten minutes, and should be 
given every other day. 

EENAL ABSCESS. 

(Abscess of the kidney. May be due to general pyemia, or 
to traumatism.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Rigors; sw^eat; emaciation; urine may contain pus, 
albumin, tube casts, and blood-corpuscles; pain and tender- 
ness in the renal region. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place patient on the back; manipulate very care- 
fully over the abscess, working gradually deeper, until the 
kidney has been manipulated as thoroughly as possible. 

2. I'lace the hand over the abscess, and vibrate (pages 
36 and 67) two minutes. 

3. Place the patient on the face; while pressing hard 
upon the sacrum with one hand, draw the limb correspond- 



THE KIDNEYS. 251 

iiig to the diseased kidney backward slowly, but as far as pos- 
sible. This operation should be repeated, the second time 
drawing the leg a little further backward. 

Great care must be exercised in giving this treatment to 
cause no unnecessary pain. If given very gently, patient 
relaxing all muscles, quite a thorough treatment can be 
given even the first time. 

Treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and should 
be given every day. 

PEEIEENAL ABSCESS. 
(Suppuration in the perirenal connective tissue.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Fluctuating tumor in the lumbar region; chills; fever; 
sweat; emaciation. 

TKEATMENT. 

See Renal Abscess (page 2.50). 

FLOATING KIDNEY. 
(Mobility of the organ. Generally the right.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

A void in its usual position ; sense of weight and drag- 
ging in the abdomen, with dull pain; sometimes nausea and 
vomiting. More common in females. 

TREATMENT. 

In treating this disease it is necessary to free the circu- 
lation and nerve- wave to the muscles and ligaments holding 
these organs in position. 

1. Place the patient on the face; with the thumbs on 
each side of and close to the spine, move the muscles upward 



252 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

and outward the entire length of the spinal column, being 
very thorough in the lumbar region, which will be found in a 
very sensitive condition, 

2. Place the patient on the back; one operator grasp- 
ing the shoulders, the other the feet, give very thorough 
extension, using as much strength as the patient can stand 
without too much inconvenience. 

3. The operator should now endeavor, by any manipu- 
lation which seems most applicable to the case, to work the 
kidney back to its normal position. 

Treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and should 
be given every other day. 

ADDISON'S DISEASE. 

(Disease of the suprarenal capsule.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Skin discolored; appetite impaired; heart action feeble; 
pulse soft and slow; nausea and vomiting. Supposed to be 
tuberculous. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 



FEVERS, INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 253 



Fevers and Infectious Diseases. 



THE VASO-MOTOR CENTER. 

The chief or general center, supplying all the non-striped 
muscles of the arterial system with motor fiber, lies in the 
medulla oblongata at a spot which contains many gangli- 
onic cellsw 

The nerA'es which pass to the blood-vessels contain vaso- 
motor fibers, and are known as vaso-motor nerves. The chief 
center reaches from the upper paii: of the floor of the medulla 
oblongata to within four to five m.m. of the calamus scripto- 
rius ( but in the higher animals other centers are distributed 
throughout the spinal cord which are able to take the place 
of the great primary center). 

Each half of the body has its own center in that part of 
the medulla oblongata which represents the upper continua- 
tion of the lateral column of the si)inal cord. 

Stimulation of this central area causes contraction of all 
the arteries, and in consequence there is great increase of 
the arterial blood-pressure, resulting in swelling of the veins 
and heart. 

Paralysis of this center causes relaxation and dilatation 
of all the arteries, and consequently there is an enormous 
fall of the blood-pressure. 

Under ordinary circumstances the vaso-motor center is 
in a condition of moderate tonic excitement. 

Just as in the case of the cardiac and respiratory centers, 
the vaso-motor center may be excited directly or refiexly. 



254 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

From the mso-motor center fibers proceed directly 
through some of the cranial nerves to their area of distribu- 
tion; through the trigeminus partly to the interior of the 
eye, through the lingual and hypoglossal to the tongue, and 
to the intestines by the splanchnics. 

All the other vasomotor fibers descend in the lateral 
column of the spinal cord; hence stimulation of the lower 
cut end of the spinal cord causes contraction of the blood- 
vessels supplied by the nerves below the point of section. 

The cervical portion of the sympathetic supplies the great 
majority of the blood-vessels of the head. 

The vaso-motor fibers to the upper extremities pass 
through the anterior roots of the middle dorsal nerves into 
the thoracic sympathetic and upward to the first thoracic 
ganglion, and from thence through the rami communicates 
to the bracliial plexus. 

The skin of the trunk receives its vaso-motor fibers 
through the dorsal and lumbar nerves. 

The lungs are supplied from the dorsal spinal cord 
through the first thoracic ganglion. 

The vasomotor fibers to the lower extremities pass 
through the nerves of the lumbar and sacral plexuses into 
the sympathetic, and from thence to the lower limbs. 

The splanchnic is the greatest vaso-motor nerve in the 
body, and supplies the abdominal viscera. 

In referr-ing to the above, from Landois, it will be 
observed (1) that the chief vaso-motor nerve-center is situ- 
ated in the medulla oblongata; (2) that the majority of and 
all the most important vaso-motor nerves descend in the lat- 
eral column of the spinal cord; and (3) that stimulation of 
the vaso-motor causes contraction of all the arteries, and a 
consequent enormous increase of the arterial blood-pressure, 



FEVERS, IXFECTIOUS DISEASES. 255 

resulting in swelling of the veins and heart; while paralysis 
of the same center causes relaxation and dilatation of all the 
arteries, and a consequent immense fall in the general blood- 
pressure. 

It is impossible for the osteopath to reach directly the 
center in the medulla oblongata. The same results are 
attained, however, through so-called ''reflew action," by a 
pressure upon the upper cervicals — where is situated the 
most important subsidiary center — at the same instant tip- 
ping the head backward, thus bringing the neck into such a 
position as to throw a pressure upon the nerves over the cer- 
vical vaso-motor center. A steady pressure at this point for 
a few moments reduces the general blood-pressure, slows the 
action of the heart, and will reduce the temperature of the 
body in one-half the time required by any other known 
method. 

Place the fingers upon the sides of the neck, the tips 
almost meeting over the spines of the upper cervicals ; tip the 
head backward, and press gently with the lingers four or 
five minutes, to reduce a fever. 

EXPLANATORY. 

Whij the Osteopath Prefers Chronic Cases. 

In the treatment of fevers and other acute diseases, 
Osteopathy is destined, in the near future, to play an import- 
ant part. At present, however, the osteopath prefers only 
chronic cases, for several very important reasons. 

iV] Osteopathy is in its infancy, and not only the profes- 
sion, but the laity, must be educated to the fact that it pos- 
sesses many virtues. A chronic invalid, who has tried every 
other known method without success, is usually willing to 
give the new science a fair trial, and if cured or benefited, 
which is usuallv the case, never tires of singing the praises of 



256 08TE0PATEJ COMPLETE. 

Osteopathy. On the other hand, very many acute caseSy 
which would require weeks of treatment by the old method, 
if an osteopath is called at once, the patient is cured so quick- 
ly that he imagines there was nothing radically wrong. If the' 
case proves at all stubborn, and does not respond quickly to^ 
osteopathic treatment, the patient and his friends areverj^apt 
to become frightened, without giving Osteopathy a fair trial,, 
and call in an M.D., in whose hands he lingers uncomplain- 
ingly for months, dying, perhaps, with the pleasant thoughts 
that he is taking all kinds of medicine and has had a con- 
sultation of leading physicians to pronounce the death- 
sentence. Had he given Osteopathy a trial of two weeks,, 
instead of two days, he might at that time have been 
convalescent. 

(2) Chronic cases can %isit the office, and seldom 
require treatment oftener than every other day; while in 
fevers the patient must be visited at his home, and should be 
treated eA^ery four or six hours. 

For the above reasons. Osteopathy deals principally 
with chronic cases. 

In fevers, as in other diseases, we seldom find two cases 
exactly alike ; it will therefore depend largely upon the good 
judgment of the operator in applying the proper treatment 
to the various conditions as they arise, whether or not he 
attains success. 

ARDENT FEVER. 

(Non-specific, continued fever, peculiar to warm climates.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Severe headache, with throbbing in the temples; may be 
delirium. Resembles inflammatory fever. 



FEVERS, INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 257 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon the back; one hand under 
the chin, the other under the occipital bone, give gentle ex- 
tension, rotating the head from side to side. 

2. Manipulate all the muscles of the neck thoroughly, 
carefully, and very deep. 

3. In all cases of diarrhea, place the hands under 
the patient, the ends of the fingers pressing close to the 
spine, immediately beloAv the last dorsal vertebra; raise 
the patient gently until only the hips and shoulders rest 
upon the bed; hold in this position a few seconds; lower the 
patient; and repeat. This treatment should be given in all 
cases of fever where diarrhea is present, 

4. Place the hand lightly over the abdomen, vibrat- 
ing gently three or four minutes (pages 36 and 67). 

5. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, the 
finger-tips almost meeting over the spinous processes of the 
upper cervicals; tip the head slightlj^ backward, thus bring- 
ing a direct pressure upon the cervical vaso-motor center; 
hold the head in this position, pressing gently, for four or 
five minutes, at the end of which time the fever will be 
reduced and the patient in a light perspiration (cut 13). 

This treatment should be given every four or six hours, 
treatment occupying about ten or fifteen minutes. 

THERMIC FEVEE, SUNSTROKE, OR INSOLATION. 

(Due to exposure to extreme heat.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Unconsciousness; high temperature; rapid pulse; head- 
ache; nausea; vertigo; inability to swallow; snoring; fre- 
quent micturition. 



258 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient in a cool place, applying ice or 
pouring cold water on the head. 

2. Flex the limbs strongly against the abdomen, giving 
them strong abduction, and extend with a light jerk. 

3. Draw the arms strongly above the head, lowering 
them with a backward motion, while pressing hard upon the 
dorsal vertebra between the scapulae. This treatment 
tends to draw the blood from the head and equalize the 
circulation. 

4. Place the hands under the chin and occipital bone, 
giving light extension of the neck, rotating the head gently 
from side to side. Manipulate all the muscles of the neck 
in a very thorough manner. 

5. If high fever, place the bauds upon the sides of the 
neck, the fingers almost meeting over the spines of the upper 
cervicals; tip the head backward, pressing hard with fingers 
five minutes. 

If the patient dies, it is generally in about nine hours 
after the attack. Many never completely recover. 

Treatment should be repeated every few hours during 
the first few days, after which a treatment every day is 
sufficient. 

SIMPLE CONTINUED FEVER. 

(Elevation of temperature, with no definite lesion. May 

be due to fatigue, error in diet, anxiety, exertion, etc.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Chilliness and fever; headache; thirst; tongue coated; 
urine scanty and high-colored. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Ardent Fever (page 257). 



FEVERS, INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 259 

2. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
seventh dorsal vertebra, move the muscles upward and out- 
ward thoroughly and deep, through the splanchnic and lum- 
bar regions. Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

Treatment should be given each day, and occupy about 
ten or fifteen minutes. 

Patient should have perfect rest, and be confined to a 
fruit and vegetable diet. 

LA GRIPPE, INFLUENZA, OR CATARRHAL FEVER. 

(Specific, infectious, essential, continued fever.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Catarrhal inflammation of the nose; headache over the 
eyes and root of the nose; soreness in back and limbs; ach- 
ing of muscles and stiffness of neck; temperature irregular; 
tongue coated; urine scanty, high-colored, and light or pro- 
fuse; skin hot, dry, and sensitive. May last a few days ov 
weeks. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the hands under the chin and occipital bone; 
give careful extension of the neck, pulling until the body 

moves. 

2. Rotate the head from side to side, manipulating 
very thoroughly the muscles on the front and sides of the 
neck, thus freeing the circulation to the head. 

3. Place the thumb upon one side, the index finger 
upon the other, of the root of the nose, and press gently, 
working the thumb and finger as deep as possible, without 
pain, into the corners of the eyes; after which, pressing 
gently, move the thumb and finger up and down the nose, 
moving the muscles, and not permitting the skin to slip 



260 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

beneath the thumb and finger. This treatment is very 
beneficial, and should not be omitted. 

4. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervical®, move the muscles upward and outward the 
entire length of the spinal column, being very thorough in 
all regions where tenderness is discovered. Treat the oppo- 
site side in a similar manner. 

5. Flex the limbs strongly upon the abdomen, giving 
them strong abduction, and extending with a light jerk. 

6. Knead the bowels gently two or three minutes; 
vibrate (pages 36 and 67) one minute each, the lungs, stom- 
ach, and'liver. 

7. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, the 
fingers almost meeting over the spines of the upper cervi- 
cals; tip the head backward, pressing hard upon the vaso- 
motor center (page 253) four or five minutes, to reduce the 
fever. 

This treatment will occupy twenty or twentj^-five min- 
utes, and should be given each day, until recovery. If given 
correctly, very gratifying results may be expected immedi- 
ately after the first treatment. 

HAY FEVER. 

(An infectious, specific catarrh of the respiratory passages. 
Probably due to the pollen of certain plants, of which 
ragweed is the most common. Also called Hay Asth- 
ma, Ragweed Fever, Autumnal Catarrh, June Cold, 
Eose Cold, Idiosyncratic Coryza, and Periodic Vaso- 
motor Coryza.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Itching and burning, and lachrymation of the eyes ; pain 
in the brow or eyeballs; itching of the nasal mucous mem- 
brane, and irritating watery discharge; a similar condition 



FEVERS, INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 261 

is in the throat, when affected, and may attack the bronchial 
mucous membrane; cough and dyspnea. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See La Grippe, 1, 2, and 3 (page 259). 

2. Place the patient upon a stool; the operator plac- 
ing the thumb of his left hand upon the angle of the second 
rib of the right side, with the right hand draw patient's right 
arm slowly but strongly above the head as patient inhales.; 
press hard with the thumb as the arm is lowered with a 
backward motion; move the thumb down to the angle of the 
next lower rib, and raise the arm as before; repeat this oper- 
ation, until the sixth rib has been reached. Treat the oppo- 
site side in a similar manner. 

3. Place the patient on the back; the right hand rest- 
ing lightly upon the center and upper part of the thorax, 
vibrate (pages 36 and G7) gently two minutes. 

Treatment will occupy about twenty minutes, and 
should be given each day. Immediate relief will be the 
result of the first treatment. 

MALARIAL FEVER, OR AGUE. 

(Periodic paroxysms of chill, fever, and perspiration. Asso- 
ciated with unicellular organism.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Chills sets in with nausea, vertigo, shivering; teeth 
chatter; skin cold and rough; coldness gives way to warmth; 
surface of the body becomes flushed ; eyes brilliant, followed 
by copious perspiration. May be intermittent, remittent, 
or pernicious. 

TREATMENT. 

ing the thumbs upon the angles of the second rib , an assist- 
1. Place the patient upon a stool: the operator plac- 



262 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ant standing in front raises the arms very strongly above 
the head, as the patient inhales; press hard upon the ribs, 
while the arms are lowered with a backward motion (cut 
24), the patient permitting the elbows to bend. Move the 
thumbs down to the next lower rib, and raise the arms as 
before; and repeat, until the last dorsal is reached. 

2. Place the patient on the back; one operator grasp- 
ing the shoulders, an asistant the feet, give thorough ex- 
tension of the spine. 

3. With the patieut in the same position, flex the 
limbs, one at a time, strongly against the abdomen, abduct- 
ing the tnee strongly, and extending the limb with a light 
jerk. 

4. Manipulate the muscles of the neck gently but 
very deep, thus freeing the circulation to the head, 

5. Place the hand lightly over the liver, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) strongly two minutes. 

6. Place the hands on sides of patient's neck, in case of 
fever, finger-tips almost meeting over the spinous processes 
of the upper cervicals; tip the head backward and press 
strongly three or four minutes upon the vasomotor center 
(cut 13). 

CEREBRO-SPINAL FEVER, SPOTTED FEVER, OR CEREBRO- 
SPINAL MENINGITIS. 
(Of specific, infectious, continued type; dependent upon 
inflammation of the cerebral and spinal meninges.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Rigor; fever; nausea; thirst; vomiting; excruciating 
headache; rigidity of head and neck; retraction of the head; 
backache; extreme prostration; delirium; stupor and coma; 
temperature fluctuates ; pulse rapid and irregular. Between 



FEVERS, IXFECTIOrS DISEASES. 263 

the third and sixth day herpetic vesicles may appear on the 
face about the mouth; may be incontinence or retention of 
urine; may be strabismus, yertigo, tinnitus aurium, and loss 
of sense of smell; tongue usually clear, 

TEEATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
occipital bone, move the muscles upward and outward, care- 
fully but very deep, through the cervical and dorsal regions. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. Great care 
must be exercised in giving this treatment to manipulate 
the muscles which are contracted, until they relax, thus free- 
ing the undue pressure upon the nerve- and blood-supply in 
this region. 

2. Place the patient on the back; with one hand under 
the chin, draw the head backward and to the side; with the 
disengaged hand manipulate the muscles upon the side of 
the neck; reverse, and treat the other side in a similar 
manner. 

?,. Place the left hand upon the top of the patient's 
head; place the right hand and arm under the patient's head 
and neck, the fingers between the scapulae at about the 
fourth or fifth dorsal, two fingers upon each side of the spin- 
ous process ; press strongly upward with the fingers, moving: 
them slowly toward the head, at the same instant pressing- 
upon the head -^ith the left hand and rotating it from side 
to side, which rotation and pressure must be continued until 
the fingers of the right hand, gradually working toward the 
head, have reached the upper cervicals (cut 46). 

4. Place the hands beneath the chin and occipital 
bone, giving strong extension of the neck, continued one 
minute. 



264 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

5. Place the bands under the patient's shoulders; an 
assistant grasping the feet, pull slowly, gradually increas- 
ing the strength, until thorough extension of the spine has 
been given. This treatment, together with extension of the 
neck and manipulation of the spinal muscles, frees the ven- 
ous circulation from the spinal cord, an obstruction of which 
is the true cause of this dread disease. 

6. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, the 
fingers almost meeting over the spinous processes of the 
upper cervicals; tip the head backward, pressing hard with 
the fingers upon the vasomotor center (page 253) for five 
minutes. 

This treatment will occupy about twenty minutes; and, 
if correctly administered, will give immediate relief. Treat- 
ment should be given about every six hours. 

A skilled osteopath, if called in any reasonable time, 
has never been known to lose a patient suffering with this 
disease. 

TYPHUS FEVER. 

(Acute, infectious, essential fever; peculiar to crowded and 
unwholesome places among the poor and wretched. 
Also known as Famine Fever, Ship Fever, and Jail 
Fever.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Eapid rise of temperature; headache; pain in the back 
and limbs; stupor; rapid pulse; face livid; on fourth or fifth 
day a spotted eruption appears on the extremities ; delirium ; 
intolerance of light; tongue brown and cracked; sordes on 
teeth and gums; urine scanty and high-colored; temperature 
usuallv 102° to 104°. 



FEVERS, INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 265 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the hands under the chin and occipital, and 
give gentle extension, pulling until the body moves slightly; 
manipulate thoroughly all the muscles of the front, sides, 
and back of the neck. 

2. A'ibrate (pages ':U> and 67) gently for one minute each 
of the following organs: lungs, liver, pancreas, kidneys, and 
bowels. 

3. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, fingers 
almost meeting over the upper cervicals; tip the head back- 
ward, pressing hard with the fingers upon the vaso-motor 
center (page 253) for five minutes, to reduce the fever. 

This treatment should be given each day, except holding 
the vaso-motor, which should be given about every six hours. 

While the cure of this fever is slow, it can be effected 
in about one-half the length of time required by any other 
method. 

TYPHOID FEVER, OR ENTERIC FEVER. 

(Acute, infectious, essential, continued fever, resembling 
typhus, with inflammation, swelling, and ulceration of 
Peyer's glands, softening of the mesenteric glands, and 
tumefaction of the spleen.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Headache; pain in the back; bleeding from the nose; 
loss of appetite ; temperature characteristic of evening exac- 
erbations and morning remissions, usually varying from 
103° to 105° ; tongue coated in the middle, with red tip and 
edges; tenderness of the abdomen, and tympanites; usually 
diarrhea, stools yellowish, . with fetid odor; pupils dilated; 
and frequently delirium and intestinal hemorrhages. Dura- 
tion usually three to five weeks. 



266 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

See Ty])1ius Fever (page 265). 

This form is more obstinate than the Typhus, and so 
speedy a cure should not be expected. A great deal is 
dependent upon proper and careful nursing in the treatment 
of this disease. 

WEIL'S DISEASE. 

(Febrile disorder, resembling typhoid fever. Peculiar to 

butchers, brewers, and laborers.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Chill; fever; headache; vomiting; pains in the epigas- 
trium; diarrhea; jaundice; stupor; delirium; coma; black 
vomit. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

YELLOW FEVER. 

(Specific, epidemic disease of hot climates.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Chill; fever; temperature 102° to 104°; capillary con- 
gestion of the face and eyes; pains in the head, back and 
calves of the legs; thirst; stomach irritated; vomit black; 
skin: deep yellow; jaundice; constipation; mind usually 
clear; tendency to hemorrhages from the mucous surfaces. 
No cure in Osteopathy. 

ASIATIC CHOLERA. 

(Acute, specific, infectious disease, peculiar to tropical 
climates.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Vomiting; diarrhea, stools "rice water" appearance; 
thirst; eyeballs sunken; skin cold and shrunken; voice lost; 



FEVERS, IXFECTIOUS DISEASES. 267 

respiration shallow and rapid: muscular cramps; suppressed 
urine; temperature normal or suppressed. 
Xo cure in Osteopathy. 

SCARLET FEVER, OR SCARLATINA. 

(Acute infectious disease, with scarlet eruptions.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Temperature rises suddenly to 104° or 105°; pulse rapid; 
red rash on neck and breast; pain in swallowing; headache; 
vomiting; strawberry tongue; skin hot and dry. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward, 
gently but deep, as low as the last dorsal vertebra. Treat 
the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Manipulate the muscles in the front and sides of 
the neck, thoroughly and deeply. 

3. Place the hands under the chin and occipital bone; 
give careful extension of the neck, pulling, slowly and gently, 
until the body moves. 

4. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, finger- 
tips almost meeting over the spinous processes of the upper 
cervicals; tip the head backward, pressing quite hard with 
the fingers, for five minutes, upon the vaso-motor center 
(page 253 and cut 13). 

Treatment will occupy ten to fifteen minutes, and should 
be given each day. 



268 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ROTHELN, ROSEOLA, EUBELLA, SPURIOUS SCARLET 
FEVER, FALSE MEASLES, BASTARD MEASLES, 
GERMAN MEASLES, OR FRENCH MEASLES. 
(Si)ecifLC, infectious disease, with rose-colored efflorescence on 
the skin, resembling both measles and scarlet fever, but 
not identical with either.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Elevation of temperature; pulse very rapid; eruption 
first appears on face; sore throat; coryza; cervical glands 
enlarged. 

TREATMENT. 

See Scarlet Fever (page 267). 

<■ MORBILLI, RUBEOLA, OR MEASLES. 
(Acute, infectious, eruptive disease, peculiar to children.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Quick rise of tempera.ture to 102° or 104°; watery eyes; 
restlessness; headache; sneezing; running from the nose; 
often cough and slight sore throat; digestion disturbed; 
coarse pink papules appear about the fourth day. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Scarlet Fever (page 267). 

2. Place the thumb of the left hand upon the angle of 
the second rib on the right side of the spine ; draw the 
patient's right arm high above the head as he fills the lungs 
to their fullest capacity; lower the arm with a backward 
motion, pressing hard at the same instant upon the angle of 
the rib. Treat the third, fourth, and fifth rib in a similar 
manner. Also the same ribs on the opposite side of 
the body. 



FETEB8, INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 269 

PERTUSSIS, OR WHOOPING-COUGH. 

(Specific, infectious, catarrhal inflammation, involving espe- 
cially the trachea and bronchi, with paroxysmal cough.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Redness of mucous membranes of eyes, nose, and throat; 
cough dry at first, becoming more frequent, paroxysmal, 
ringing, and accompanied by a shrill, reiterated whoop; fre- 
quently vomiting; purulent discharge from the nose; capri- 
cious appetite,' restless sleep and slight fever. In duration 
it varies from one week to one yeai% usual period ranging 
from three weeks to three months. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the hand under the chin, drawing the head 
backward and rotating it to the side, at the same instant 
manipulating the muscles, carefully but deep. Treat the 
opposite side of the neck in a similar manner. Also man- 
ipulate the muscles immediately about the trachea, drawing 
the trachea upward as much as possible. 

2. Place the hands under the chin and occipital bone, 
giving gentle extension and rotation. 

3. Place the knee between the scapulae, at about the 
second dorsal ; draw the arms slowly but strongly upward as 
the patient inhales, lowering them with a backward motion, 
pressing hard with the knee upon the upper dorsal region. 

4. Place the patient on the back; the hand resting 
lightly over the bronchi, vibrate (pages .36 and 67) gently two 
minutes. 

5. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, finger- 
tips almost meeting over the upper cervicals; tipping the 
head slightly backward, press gently four or five minutes 
upon the ^aso-rnotor center (page 2.53). 



270 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

PAROTIDITIS, OR MUMPS. 

(Acute, specific, infectious inflammation of tlie parotid 

glands.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Swelling and pain in one or both parotid glands ; move- 
ments of the jaw and mastication painful; slight fever with 
more or less headache. There is little danger, although 
there are instances in which, from exposure to cold, the dis- 
ease has been transmitted to the testicles of boys and to the 
breasts of girls with serious results. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the hands under the chin and occipital bone, 
giving gentle extension and rotation of the neck. 

2. Manipulate thoroughly all muscles of the neck, 
being particularly thorough in the region of the parotid 
gland. 

These manipulations free the circulation to the head, and 
will cure any case of mumps in a very few days. Treatment 
should be given each day. 

VARIOLA, OR SMALL-POX. 
(Specific, infectious disease, with papular eruptions.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Chill; fever; headache; vomiting; swelling; pain in 
back; coated tongue; papular eruptions — at first vesicles, 
becoming pustules. 

Not treated by osteopaths. 



FEVERS, IXFECTIOUS DISEASES. 271 

VARICELLA, OR CHICKEN-POX. 
(Acute, specific, infectious disease, peculiar to children.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Elevation of temperature; eruption of papules, which 
become vesicles; eruptions appear on scalp, face, trunk, and 
extremities. 

TEEATMEXT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at thf^ 
upper cervicals. move the muscles upward and outward the 
entire length of the spinal column, gently but deep. Treat 
the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Flex the limbs, one at a time, strongly against the 
abdomen, giving the knee strong abduction as the limb is 
extended with a light jerk. 

3. Place the hands under the chin and the occipital 
bone, giving gentle extension and rotation of the head and 
neck. 

4. Draw the arms slowly but strongly above the head 
as the patient inhales, lowering them with a backward 
motion. 

5. Hold the vaso-motor (page 2.53). 

ERYSIPELAS. 

(Acute, specific, infectious disease, with inflammation of the 
derma and subcutaneous tissue.) 

SYMPTOMS. . 

Chill; fever; appearance on the cheek of an area of red 
induration; redness increases in extent, and attended with 
swelling; tongue coated; anorexia; and often sore throat. 
TKEATMEXT. 

This disease is caused by an obstruction to the venous 
circulation, and should be treated with a view of freeing said 



272 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

circulation between the seat of disease and the heart. If in 
the leg, flex the limb, gently at first, but with increasing 
strength, using great care to give no unnecessary pain; 
abduct the knee strongly as the limb is extended. This treat- 
ment should be repeated, growing stronger each time, until 
finally the limb can be flexed against the abdomen, thus 
stretching all the muscles of the thigh and freeing the 
circulation. 

It is also well to grasp the limb with both hands close to 
the thigh, rotating the flesh as deeply as possible, working 
down the entire length of the limb in this manner. 

If' in the head, a very thorough treatment of the neck 
should be given, manipulating the muscles very thoroughly 
and deeply, also giving extension. 

Working upon these principles, erysipelas in any part of 
the body can be treated successfully and cured in a very few 
days. 

Treatment should be given each day and occupy about 
fifteen minutes. 

DENGUE. 
(Acute, infectious disease, with severe pains in muscles and 

joints.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Anorexia; headache; vertigo; drowsiness; elevation 
of temperature; stiffness of the neck; pain along the spine 
and lumbar region ; eruptions resembling scarlatina. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; moving the muscles 
upward and outward, gently but very deep, the entire length 
of the spinal column, being particular to manipulate the 



FEYERS, INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 273 

muscles rery deeply in the back of the neck and lumbar 
region. 

2. Flex the limbs gently against the abdomen, and give 
strong abduction as they are extended. 

3. Knead very thoroughly all the muscles around 
the joints, thus freeing the circulation and thereby relieving 
the pain. 

4. Place the hands under the chin and occipital bone, 
giving gentle extension and rotation of the neck; also 
manipulate carefully and deeply the muscles of the front and 
sides of the neck. 

5. Hold vaso-motor (page 2.o3) four or five minutes. 
This treatment will give immediate relief, occupying 

about fifteen minutes, and should be given each day, until 
recovery. 

DIPHTHERIA. 

(Acute infectious disease, most commonly affecting the 
throat, characterized by a tendency to the formation of 
a fibrinous exudation constituting a false membrane.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Diphtheria is divisible into two forms, simple and ma- 
lignant. In the simple variety, happily the most common, 
the symptoms are at first so mild as to excite little complaint 
beyond a slight difficulty of swallowing or pain in the throat, 
burning skin, pains in the limbs, etc. 

Malignant diphtheria is ushered in with severe fever, 
rigors, vomiting or purging, sudden great prostration and 
restlessness,anxious countenance,etc.,pointing to some over- 
whelming disease under which the system is laboring. The 
skin is hot, the face flushed, the throat sore, and the mucous 
membrane of the throat bright red ; the tonsils are swollen, 

-IS- 



274 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

and gray or white patches of deposit appear on them, small 
at first, but gradually enlarging, so that one patch merges 
into another, forming a false membrane in the throat, render- 
ing swallowing and even breathing difficult; in some cases 
the false membrane has been detached and after extreme 
effort ejected, presenting nearly an exact mold of the throat. 
The exudation of diphtheria may be distinguished from a 
slough by its easily crumbling, by the facility with which it 
can often be detached, and by the surface thus exposed being 
red, but not ulcerated. The glands of the neck are always 
enlarged; sometimes pain is felt in the ear, and there is gen- 
erally stiffness of the neck. 

As the disease progresses, the patient passes into a 
stupor, and the difficulty of swallowing or breathing increases 
till the false membrane is ejected, or the patient dies from 
suffocation, or he sinks from exhaustion similar to that 
observed in tj^phoid fever. 

Dangerous symptoms are a quick, feeble, or very slow 
pulse, persistent vomiting, drowsiness, delirium, suppressed 
urine, and bleeding from the nose. 

CAUSE. 

Diphtheria is caused by a contraction of the muscles of 
the neck and thorax, as well as by a contraction of the mus- 
cles of respiration, which, interfering with the circulatiou of 
the fluids of the body, cause the inflamed condition of the 
larynx, bronchial tubes, and throat. 

Diphtheria, even in its most malignant form, succumbs 
to the following treatment. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the back; with one hand under 
the chin, the other under the back of the head, pull gently, 
rotating the head from side to side (cut 8). 



FEVERS. IXFECTIOUS DISEASES. 275 

2. Pull slowly and strongly until the body moves, 
without rotating the head. 

3. With the fingers, beginning under the chin, move 
all the muscles of the neck from side to side, 

4. Place the finger in patient's mouth and move the 
muscles of the throat gently; this loosens the membrane, 
which usually will be immediately expelled. 

5. With one hand draw the arm high above the head; 
at the same instant, with the fingers of the other between 
the spine and scapula at its upper border, press firmly on the 
angle of the rib, lower the arm with a backward motion, 
move the fingers one inch down the spine, draw up the arm, 
and repeat until the lower border of the scapula is reached. 
Treat the other side in a similar manner. 

6. Place the arms around patient's body, the fingers 
meeting at the spine immediately below the last ribs, and„ 
while pressing with the fingers on each side of the spine, 
raise the patient's body slowly and gently until only the hips 
and shoulders rest on the bed; this should be repeated two or 
three times, moving the hands two or three inches eachi time 
toward the head; it will instantly stop all purging and 
vomiting. 

7. Place one hand on each side of the neck, the fingers 
almost meeting below the occipital bone (see cut 13) ; press 
gently for two or three minutes. It is here you reach nerves 
that control the caliber of the arteries, thus slowing the 
action of the heart. 

Diphtheria in its most malignant form has never, in our 
experience, failed to yield readily to this treatment, instant 
relief being experienced and a complete cure effected in a 
very few days. Treatment should be given every six hours, 
and the vasomotor center (cut 13) may be held at any time, 
as it always gives relief. 



276 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

BRAIN EEVER. 

(Inflammation of the brain or its membranes.) 

EXPLANATORY. 

Referring again to the anatomy, we find that the brain, 
the great dynamo which generates the forces that control 
the system, is contained in the cavity of the cranium, and, 
to perform the varied tasks imposed upon it, must be bounti- 
fully supplied with arterial blood, which must circulate freely 
and return quickly to the heart through an unobstructed 
channel. The blood leaves the arch of the aorta through 
the innominate artery, and ascends obliquely to the upper 
border of the right sternoclavicular articulation, where it 
divides into the right common carotid and right subclavian 
arteries, the latter supplying the arm, while the common 
carotid passes obliquely upward from behind the sterno- 
clavicular articulation to a level with the upper border of 
the thyroid cartilage, opposite the third cervical vertebra, 
where it divides into the external and internal carotid, whose 
branches, together with the vertebral artery, supply the 
brain. As these arteries and the corresponding veins must 
pass through a network of muscles to reach their destination, 
the great mystery is that we are ever free from headache 
caused by an obstruction to their free flow. 

SYMPTOMS. 

The symptoms which usually precede brain fever are 
pain in the head, redness of the eyes, a violent flushing of 
the face, disturbed sleep or a total want of it, great dryness 
of the skin, costiveness, retention of the urine, a small drop- 
ping of blood from the nose, singing in the ears, and extreme 
sensibility of the nervous system. The pulse is often weak, 
irregular, and trembling, but sometimes is hard and con- 
tracted; a remarkable quickness of hearing is a common 



FEVERS, IXFECTIOUS DISEASES. 277 

SYmptom of this disease, as is also a great throbbing of the 
arteries in the neck and temples; a constant trembling, sup- 
pression of the urine, a total want of sleep, and a grinding of 
the teeth, which may be considered as a kind of convulsion. 

CAUSE. 

Brain fever, usually fatal when treated by the old 
methods, can be traced directly to a contraction of the mus- 
cles of the neck, obstructing the returning blood. With 
the heart still pumping the blood into the brain and the 
escape cut off, do you wonder at brain fever, or can you 
doubt for an instant that to remove the obstruction, allow- 
ing the pent-up venous blood to escape down its proper 
channel, w^ould cure the disease? 

We have yet to find a case of brain fever that, if taken 
in any reasonable time, can not be instantly relieved, and 
in a compai'atively short time cured, by our Brain Fever 
Treatment. We trust that not only every person who reads 
these pages, but the medical fraternity in particular, will 
try this method, as, if it is generally adopted, it will save 
hundreds of lives annually. 

TEEATMEXT. 

1. Place one hand under the chin, the other under 
the back of the head, and pull gently, rotating the head as 
far as possible from side to side, the object being to stretch 
all the muscles of the neck. 

2. Pull gently on the head (being very careful not to 
rotate it) until sufficient strength is used to move the body. 

3. With the fingers move all the flesh and muscles 
of the neck and throat, working gently but deep. 

4. Eaise the arm high above the head (see cut 10) 
with one hand, with the fingers of the other pressing hard 
between the spine and scapula, beginning at the upper 
border of the scapula. Lower the arm with a backward 



278 . OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

motion, and repeat, moving tlie fingers down one inch each 
time, until the lower angle of the scapula is reached. Treat 
the other side in a similar manner. 

5. Hold the vaso-motor center, one hand on each 
side of the neck, the fingers almost meeting close to the 
head (cut 13), and in five minutes your patient will be asleep 
and out of danger. 

In critical cases this treatment may be repeated as often 
as circumstances seem to require. Once in six hours is 
usually all that is necessary. The vaso-motor center may 
be held at any time, and always gives relief. 

Of the many cases treated by us, we will mention that of 
a gentleman of Baxter Springs, Kansas, who was delirious 
when we reached his bedside, and had been given up by the 
family physician. After a treatment that lasted not over 
ten minutes, his wife, bending over the couch, said to him: 
"Ben, how do you feel?" He replied: ''Better, you bet!" 
turned over, and went to sleep for the first time in days. He 
improved rapidly, and in two weeks had entirely recovered. 

We are perfectly satisfied that brain fever, if treated 
in time b}' these never-failing principles, is no more to be 
dreaded than a bad cold. 

TUBERCULOSIS. 

(Infectious disease, due to tubercle bacillus within some 
organ or tissue.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Emaciation; anemia; weakness; causeless sweats; 
tubercle bacillus in the blood. 
No cure in Osteopathy. 



FEVERS, IXFECTIOlfi DISEASES. 279 

MILIARY FEVER. 

(Infectious disease, with disorder of the sweat glands, and 
obstruction to their ducts.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Fever; profuse sweating; tenderness and sense of 
oppression at the epigastrium; eruption, consisting of small 
and reddish macula? with vesicle in the center, most gener- 
ally about the neck and trunk. 

Not treated by osteo^jaths. 

LEPROSY, OR ELEPHANTIASIS (BLACK). 

(A chronic, specific, infectious, hereditary disease, charac- 
terized by ulcerous eruptions, tubercles, anesthetic 
patches, neuritis, and desquamations of dead skin.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Eeddish violet-colored patches, becoming darker; nod- 
ules; fierce expression ; sloughing; no pain; temperature 
usually subnormal; gradual wasting. 

Not treated by osteopaths. 

HYDROPHOBIA, OR RABIES. 

(An acute, specific, infectious disease, communicated by 
the bite of a rabid animal, due to a specific virus in the 
saliva, characterized by a great disturbance of the 
central nervous system, diflBculty of swallowing, convul- 
sive dread of water, and spasmodic muscular con- 
tractions.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Thirst; painful spasms of the larynx when attempting 

to swallow water; sensitiveness to light. sounds, or draughts; 



280 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

dyspnea; struggling; gasping; convulsions; foaming and 
frothing at the mouth. 

Not treated by osteopaths. 

ANTHRAX, SPLENIC FEVER, OR CHARBON. 

(A contagious and malignant febrile disease, characterized 
by the presence of the bacillus anthracis, and often 
by carbuncular swellings (malignant pustule); derived 
from herbivorous animals; peculiar to butchers, wool- 
sorters and workers in hides.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pimple appears at the site of inoculation; skin red; 
papule becomes vesicular and pustular, with subsequent 
gangrene; fever; depression; and septic pyemia. 

Not treated by osteopaths. 

MILK-SICKNESS (ALSO CALLED SWAMP-SICKNESS, THE 
TREMBLES). 

(Acute, infectious, malignant fever of cattle, and affecting 
man by transmittance through milk and meat.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Muscular tremor; soapy, yellowish vomit; fetid breath; 
constipation, attended with violent retching and a burning 
in the stomach; often terminating fatally on the third day. 

Not treated by osteopaths. 

TRICHINOSIS, OR TRICHINISIS (THE FLESH- WORM 

DISEASE). 

(Acute infectious diseaise, caused by a small round worm 

from meat of diseased swine.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Gastric and intestinal irritation; pain and stiffness of 
volutary muscles; edema of the eyelids, face, and feet; 



FEYERS, INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 281 

profuse perspiration; anorexia; tongue coated; breath foul; 
nausea; diarrhea; slight fever. 
Not treated by osteopaths. 

GLANDERS. 
(Infectious disease, peculiar to horses, and transmitted to 

man through an abrasion of the skin.) 

t 

SYMPTOMS. 

Site of inoculation becomes inflamed; elevation of 
temperature; headache; eruption vesicular, then pustular; 
nodules beneath the skin, which soften and rupture, discharg- 
ing a greenish pus. 

Not treated by osteopaths. 

ACTINOMYCOSIS, OR LTJMP-JAW. 

(Specific, infectious disease of cattle, occasionally in man; 

due to "ray-fungus.") 

SYMPTOMS. 

Usually attacks the lower jaw, but sometimes on the 
tongue, in lungs, or intestines; tumor, swelling, and suppu- 
ration; pyemic symptoms. 

Not treated by osteopaths. 

FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE (ECZEMA EPIZOOTICA). 

(A specific, contagious disease, communicated to man from 
domestic animals, in which ulcers are formed about the 
month and hoofs. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Fever; soreness of mouth; vesicles which burst and 
leave shallow ulcers; tongue swells; eating painful. 
Not treated by osteopaths. 



282 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 



Constitutional Diseases. 



» SYPHILIS. 

(A contagious constitutional disease. May be acquired or 

congenital.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Acquired syphilis is characterized (i) by the initial 
lesion, or chancre, which appears usually in a week after con- 
tagion; (2) by a period of incubation generally lasting six 
weeks, but varying from one to three months; (3) febile 
symptoms,, manj- forms of skin eruptions, ulcers on the ton- 
sils; adenitis, wart-like growths about the anus, iritis, retini- 
tis, and loss of hair; (4) after an interval of from several 
months to twenty years by the so-called ''tertiary phe- 
nomena." 

TREATMENT. 

Syphilitic conditions are not treated successfully by 
osteopaths, except in the chronic form, when a thorough 
General Treatment (page 306). which softens and stretches 
the muscles, frees the circulation, and equalizes the forces of 
the body, is often very beneficial. 

GENERAL DEBILITY. 

While we cannot roll back the vail of years, we propose 
to prove to our friends in advanced life that we can at least 
make them feel quite young again. In old age the muscles, 
arteries, and, in fact, all the organs, are prone to ossify. The 



COXSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 283 

muscles become contracted and stiff, thus interfering with 
the free flow of blood, and limy deposits form around the 
joints. It is but reasonable and na.tural that our General 
Treatment (page 306). which stretches and frees all the mus- 
cles, ligaments, and joints, causing the blood to run faster 
and the heart to beat stronger, would be especialy applicable. 
It has been tested and proven times without number, and 
we feel that we can safely assert without fear of contra- 
diction that our General Treatment with the aged and infirm 
never has failed to give gratifying results, and never will. 

We will mention in this connection the case of a gentle- 
man eightj-one years of age, of Miami, Indian Territory, in 
whom the machinery of life had nearly run down. His sons, 
hearing of some of our rather remarkable cures, brought the 
old man in, much against his will, for treatment. He was car- 
ried into our office and laid upon the table. After an ex- 
amination, we pronounced the case hopeless, as we did not 
think there was enough vitality left to respond to the treat- 
ment and once more resume control of the machinery of life. 
However, we administered a General Treatment, and were 
as much surprised as his sons to see the old gentleman get up 
and walk down stairs unassisted. In three weeks he was 
restored to health and threw away the cane he had carried 
for thirty years. Being a man of undoubted veracity and 
well known throughout the Indian Territory and southern 
Kansas, his seemingly miraculous restoration to health 
through this i^ethod gave us quite an enviable reputation 
through that section of the country. Sometimes, when weary 
and annoyed by many questions put to him regarding our 
method, he would tell the people that he was no walking 
advertisement. 

That the young as well as the old can be benefited by this 
General Treatment has been proved in numerous instances. 



284 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

after ail other known methods have failed. One case we will 
mention is that of a child eighteen months old. Her cold, 
emaciated limbs, and the eruj)tions on her face and neck 
and in the ears, told too plainly to be misunderstood the 
story of contracted muscles and of stagnant blood. Although 
the little sufferer was so low that her case seemed almost 
hopeless, she was cured in four treatments, given every sec- 
ond day, and is now a healthy child. 

ACUTE ARTICULAR RHEUMATISM, OR RHEUMATIC 
FEVER. 

(Acute rheumatism. Specific inflammation of the joints 
and their contiguous structures, with pain and swelling.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Acute rheumatism is usually ushered in with fever and 
inflammation about one or more of the larger joints, the 
shoulder, elbow, knee, or ankle usually being first affected. 
Exposed joints appear to be more prone to attacks than those 
that are covered, the larger more frequently than the smaller, 
and the small joints of the hand more frequently than those 
of the feet. The affected joints are swollen, surrounded by 
a rose-colored blush, and acutely painful ; the pain has many 
degrees of intensity, generally abates somewhat in the day, 
but is aggravated at night, and in all cases is increased by 
pressure, so that the touch of the nurse or weight of the 
bedclothes can scarcely be borne. Also some or all of the 
following symptoms: Loss of appetite; chilliness; urine 
scanty, high-colored, and abnormally acid; copious, acid, 
and pungent perspiration. 

CAUSE. 

Rheumatism is caused in the lower extremity by a con- 
traction of the muscles of the thigh, obstructing either the 



CONSTITUTIOXAL DISEASES. 285 

femoral, iliac, or long saphenous ^ieins; in the npper extrem- 
ity by contraction of the muscles of the shoulder, obstructing 
either the brachial, axillary, or subclavian reins. As the 
waters of a river, if obstructed between high, strong banks, 
may not cause any particular trouble at that point, but will 
back up, flooding the lower country, so this river of blood, 
while causing no great inconvenience at the obstruction, 
backs up, distending the smaller veins and capillaries. The 
heart, still pumping, finally feels the pressure, and we have 
rheumatism of the heart, while the stagnant blood soon 
becomes feverish, and we have inflammatory rheumatism, 
first below and finally above the obstruction. Laying aside 
all prejudice and skepticism, and looking at the matter from 
an unbiased and common-sense standpoint, would it not be 
as sensible to throw medicine into the river to remove the 
cause of a flood as to put it into the stomach to free the 
obstructed vein? 

If we may be permitted to once more refer to the anat- 
omy, we will turn the stomach and endeavor to follow a 
dose of medicine on its journey from the stomach to its 
destination at the femoral or saphenous vein, first assertinsf. 
however, that the same quantity of the same medicine never 
has the same effect twice on the same individual, from the 
fact that the stomach is never found twice in exactly the 
same condition, containing as it does different foods in 
different stages of digestion. Thus your doctor must begin 
by guessing Vv^hat to give and how much to give, and con- 
tinue guessing until you accidentally stretch the contracted 
muscle and commence to recover,and then he guesses that his 
medicine did the work. There will be no guesswork, however, 
in tracing the medicine from the stomach and asserting 
what portion (if any) reaches the affected part. Passing 



286 CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 

from tli€ month through the esophagus, it first reaches the 
cardiac end of the stomach. While in the mouth the gastric 
juice commences to flow, and is greatly increased by the time 
the drug gets to the stomach. Being kept in motion in a 
large quantity of liquid, in from fifteen to thirty minutes 
it reaches the pyloric orifice of the stomach and is emptied 
into the duodenum, where it is mixed with the pancreatic 
juice from the pancreas and the bile from the liver. As these 
juices, together with the gastric juice of the stomach, are 
capable of changing the entire character of almost any sub- 
stance on which they are allowed to act, it is not only 
possible,'but probable, that they also change the character 
of the drug to a greater or less extent, thus adding to the 
system of guessing indulged in by the medical practitioner. 
The duodenum and upper portion of the small intestine are 
lined with a velvety substance, termed villi, which, immedi- 
ately upon the entrance of any substance into the intestine, 
passes all particles of richness through the walls of the 
intestine into the thoracic duct, permitting all refuse matter 
to pass on to the rectum. It is possible that here a goodly 
portion of the drug is refused by the villi, and is passed with 
the feces ; a portion, however, has reached the thoracic duct. 
The thoracic duct conveys the great mass of lymph and 
chyle into the blood. It varies in length from fifteen to 
eighteen inches in the adult, and extends from the second 
lumbar vertebra to the root of the neck; it commences in 
the abdomen by a triangular dilatation, the receptaculum 
chyli, which is situated upon the front of the body of the 
second lumbar vertebra, to the right side and behind the 
aorta ; it ascends into the thorax through the aortic opening 
in the diaphragm, opposite the fourth dorsal vertebra; it 
inclines toward the left side and ascends behind the arch of 
tlie aorta to the left side of the esophagus, and behind the 
first portion of the left subclavian artery to the upper orifice 




Cut 29.— Rotating Flesh on Leg. 



C0N8TITUTI0XAL DISEASES. 289 

of the thorax, opposite the seventh cervical vertebra; it now 
curves outward and then downward over the subclavian 
artery, and terminates in the left subclavian vein. 

We will now follow what remains of our drug through 
the thoracic duct and into the subclavian vein in the neck, 
opposite the seventh cervical vertebra. It next passes into 
the innominate artery, which empties into the superior vena 
cava, through which it reaches the heart, and is immediately 
pumped through the pulmonary artery into the lungs, from 
which it is conveyed through the pulmonary veins back to 
the heart, from where it is distributed equally to all parts 
of the system. How much (if any) ever reaches the con- 
tracted muscle it will indeed be difficult to determine. 

In discussing this subject we are reminded of the story 
of an Irishman with rheumatism; his physician wrote him 
a prescription and instructed him to rub it on. The Irish- 
man, in his ignorance, rubbed his leg with the paper, and he 
was immediately relieved; thus demonstrating that there is 
more virtue in the rubbing advised than in the liniments 
themselves. 

Now, believing that our readers will understand our 
reasons for taking the position that man is a machine and 
should be treated accordingly, especially in rheumatic 
troubles, we will return to the treatuient of this disease when 
located in the lower extremities. 

TREATMENT. 

Lower Extremity. 
1. Place the patient on the back; grasping the ankle 
tirmly with the right hand (should the right limb be affected), 
place the left on the knee and flex the limb slowly and gently 
as far as possible without too much suffering, rotating it 
gently from right to left; extend the leg. and it will be found 

—19— 



290 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

that it can be returned to its former position with apparent 
ease; bend it now another inch and straighten. 

2. Place one liand on each side of the thigh, close to 
the body, and with a firm pressure move all the muscles from 
right to left and from left to right (cut 29) the entire length 
of the limb, very gently at first, but stronger as the patient 
becomes used to the treatment. 

3. GrasiJing the foot, pull slowly, at the same time 
rotating the limb, using as much strength as the patient can 
stand. 

4. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
first lumbar vertebra, with the fingers close to the spine, 
move the muscles upward and outward down as low as the 
lower border of the sacrum. 

This treatment should be given every other day, and, 
if care is taken, it need not be very painful, and will certainly 
cure the most acute case of inflammatory rheumatism in 
from two to six weeks. 

Of the numerous cases cured by us, we will mention 
that of a gentleman at Webb City, Missouri, who had been 
given up by the medical doctors and in whose case the rheu- 
matism not only extended the entire length of the spinal 
column and right limb, but was felt perceptibly in the heart. 
Ten days after the first treatment was given he walked 
without his crutches, and in six weeks resumed his usual 
vocation, entirely cured. 

Another gentleman of the same city, whose right limb 
was double its natural size from this disease, was cured in 
five days. 

Founded as it is upon common sense and scientific 
principles, this system of treatment, if properly administered, 
is absolutelv infallible. 




Cut 30. — Rheumatism in Arm. 



COXSTIfUTIONAL DISEASES. 293 

I'pper Extremity. 

1. Raise the arm as higii and strongly as possible, 
but slowly, above the head. With the thumb of the disen- 
gaged hand (beginning at the upper border of the scapula) 
press upward on the muscles between the scapula and spine, 
while raising the arm (see cut 10). Lower the arm with a 
backward motion, move the thumb down an inch, and again 
raise the arm, repeating until the lower border of the scapula 
is reached. 

2. Place one hand on the shoulder, pushing the mus- 
cles toward its point; with the other grasp the patient's 
elbow, and, while pressing hard with both hands, move the 
arm forward and upward around the head (cut 30). 

3. Grasp the arm with one hand close to the shoul- 
der; with the other hold the arm from turning and move the 
muscles from right to left and from left to right the entire 
length of the arm. 

4. Stretch the arm. pulling slowly but very strongly. 

5. Should the seat of pain be located beneath the 
trapezius in the upper dorsal region, place two fingers of the 
right hand beneath the trapezius muscle, just above the clav- 
icle (in case the trouble is in the right shoulder) ; the right 
forearm of the patient should rest upon the forearm of the- 
operator, near the bend of the elbow; the left hand of the 
operator should be placed upon and just below the scapula, 
of the patient, who should be in a sitting position. The 
patient should be instructed to relax all muscles as much as 
possible; the operator with his left hand should now throw 
the scapula as far upward and forward as possible, at the 
same instant pressing very deep with the fingers of the right 
hand under the trapezius muscle and over the clavicle; also^ 
with the right elbow, bring the patient's arm forward, 
upward, and outward with a circular motion. 



294 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

This treatment not only cures any form of rheumatism, 
but paralysis and various forms of blood disorders in that 
member. 

Entire System. 

When inflammatory rheumatism extends over the entire 
system, the spinal column as well as the extremities should 
be treated. 

1. Place the patient on the side; using the arm as 
a lever (see cut 7), beginning with the fingers at the base 
of the neck, close to the spine, move the muscles upward and 
outward the entire length of the spinal column, 

2. 'Place one hand under the chin, the other under 
the back of the head; have an assistant take the feet, and 
pull steadily as hard as the patient can stand. 

it is indeed surprising how quickly a patient responds to 
this treatment. 

SUBACUTE ARTICULAE RHEUMATISM. 
(Milder in degree than the ordinary form, but more persist- 
ent; one or more joints may be affected.) 

TREATMENT. 

Same as the acute form (page 289). 

CHRONIC ARTICULAR RHEUMATISM. 

(Pain or stiffness in one or more joints, or in their contiguous 
tissues; most frequently in the shoulder or knee.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

This sometimes follows the acute form, at other times 
coming on quite independently of any previous attack; in 
time the affected limbs lose their power of motion, and 
lameness results, the hip- and knee-joints being most often 
affected; sometimes there is emaciation of the muscles; 



CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 295 

sometimes permanent contraction of a limb, or bony stiffness 
of the joints; pain more or less constant; worse in damp 
weather or approaching storm ; not much tenderness ; rarely 
any swelling or elevation of temperature; joints frequentlj' 
crack or grate on motion. This form of the disease is the 
result of the uncured acute form. It may be limited to one 
part of the body, or extend to several, and may be fixed or 
shifting. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acnte Articular Rheumatism (page 289). 

Particular care should be taken to knead and manipu- 
late the muscles deeply and thoroughly around any and al' 
joints affected. The operator should be very particular in 
flexing said joints as much as possible without giving pain, 
flexing them a little further at each successive treatment. 

Treatment will occupy fifteen or twenty minutes, accord- 
ing to the number of joints involved, and should be given 
every other day. 

ACUTE MUSCULAR RHEUMATISM. 

(Rheumatism involving the muscles.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Onset sudden, or first noticed on attempting to rise in 
the morning; catching, tearing, or burning pain on attempt- 
ing to bend or move; no joints affected. 

TREATMENT. 

Treat the muscles as in Acute Articular Rheumatism 
(page 289), being very particular to knead and manipulate 
very thoroughly. 

Treatment should be given each day. Immediate relief 
will follow the first treatment, and a speedj^ cure may be 
exnected. 



296 OSTEOPATHT COMPLETE. 

CHRONIC MUSCULAR RHEUMATISM. 

(Continuation of the acute form.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

They are very similar to those of Chronic Articular 
Kheumatism, except that the muscles, and not the joints, 
are involved. 

TEEATMENT. 

See Acute Articular Eheumalism (page 289). 

Very thorough manipulation of the muscles in the 
affected parts, together with flexion and extension of the 
extremities, should be given. Treatment should be given 
every other day. 

TORTICOLLIS, WRYNECK, OR STIFF NECK. 

(A form of muscular rheumatism involving the cervical mus- 
cles, which draws the head toward the affected side.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Head drawn and fixed to one side; the sterno-cleido mas- 
toid muscle is especially rigid and tender on pinching; may 
also involve the trapezius and splenius. 

TEEATMENT. 

1, Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
occipital bone, move the muscles upward and outward, 
gently but very deep, as low as the last dorsal vertebra. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner, 

2, Manipulate the contracted muscle very thoroughly 
and deep, 

3, Place one hand under the chin, the other under 
the occipital, giving gentle extension and rotation, endeavor- 



CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 297 

ing to stretch as mucli as possible the muscles at fault. 
This treatment is very beneficial even in chronic cases. 

Treatment should be given ever}^ other day; and will 
occupy about ten minutes. 

SCIATICA, OR SCIATIC RHEUMATISM. 

(Neuralgia of the hip and thigh.) 

Sciatic rheumatism may be caused either by a pressure 

on the nerve itself in or near the thigh, or in the spine at the 

origin of the nerves that form the sacral plexus, of which the 

great sciatic nerve is a continuation. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Flex the leg (with one hand grasping the ankle, 
the other resting on the kneej as far as possible toward the 
chest, slowly but strongly. 

2. Extend the leg, turning the knee in, the foot out. 

8. With one hand on each side of the thigh, move all 
the muscles from right to left and vice versa, very deep 
(cut 29). 

4. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
last dorsal vertebra, with the fingers close to the spine, 
move the muscles upward and outward from the spine to 
the end of the sacrum. 

This treatment will cure the most stubborn cases of 
sciatic rheumatism in from six weeks to three months. 

LUMBAGO. 

(Rheumatic pain in the loins; neuralgia affecting the small 

of the back.) 
Lumbago, which may be traced to many different causes, 
can be invariably cured by our method; acute cases almost 



298 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

instantly, and chronic cases of many years' standing by a 
continuation of the treatment. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; using the limb as 
a lever (cut 31), with the fingers close to the spine, com- 
mencing a little above the last lumbar vertebra, move the 
muscles up and out from the spine with each upward motion 
of the limb. 

2. Extend the limb, move the hands down one inch, 
and repeat until the lower part of the sacrum is reached. 

3. Place the patient on the back; grasping the ankle, 
flex one limb after the other as far as possible toward the 
chest, thus stretching the muscles of the back (cut 32). 

4. Place the patient on the face; with the thumbs 
on each side of the spine, beginning at the second lumbar 
vertebra, press rather hard, moving the muscles upward; 
move the thumbs down one inch, and repeat until you have 
reached the second sacral vertebra; being very careful to 
work thoroughly and deeply on each side of and a little below 
the last lumbar vertebra, as it is here the trouble is usually 
found. 

Here also is found the seat of kidney disease and female 
troubles. It is noticeable in those cases that the patient 
usually has a weak back, and it has been demonstrated 
beyond the shadow of a doubt that, working on these princi- 
ples, not only the back, but the accompanying disorders, can 
be entirely cured. 

Of the many cases of lumbago treated by us, we will 
mention that of a gentleman of Baxter Springs, Kansas. He 
was assisted into our office, and told how, ten years before, 
he was afflicted in a similar manner, being bedfast for six 
months and on crutches two years. We gave him a treat- 




Cut 31. — lyumbago. 




Cut 32. — Sciatic Rheumatism. 



CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 303 

ment, not occupying over two minutes and curing him 
instantly. 

We might also mention the case of a gentleman of 
Neutral, Kansas, cured by us in two weeks, after having 
been given up by the medical fraternity. 

EHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS, OR RHEUMATIC GOUT. 

(Inflammation of the joints, resulting in deformity. May 

be acute or chronic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Acute stage is similar to Acute Articular Rheumatism, 
and may extend to fingers and toes. Chronic stage, joints 
tender and painful, slightly swollen, numbness and tingling; 
progressive, with occasional remissions. More common in 
females. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Articular Rheumatism (page 289). 

ACUTE GOUT. 

(A specific arthritis, characterized by uric acid in the blood, 

and deposit of sodium urate in the joints.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Colicky pains in the stomach and bowels; diarrhea alter- 
nating with constipation; urine scanty and heavily loaded; 
usually attacks the great toe, which becomes hot, red, and 
swollen. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 

upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward, 

thoroughly and deep, the entire length of the spine, being 

very particular in the region of the splanchnic nerves and in 



304 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the lumbar region. Treat the opposite side in a similar 
manner. 

2. Place the patient on the face; the thumbs of the 
operator on each side of the spinal column at the second lum- 
bar vertebra, an assistant raises the limbs, (1) drawing them 
toward the operator on a level with the table, then (2) up as 
far as the patient can stand, then (3) carrying them back 
until they are parallel with the table, the operator pressing 
hard with his thumbs upon the second lumbar; (4) the limbs 
should now be lowered, the thumbs placed upon the third 
lumbar, and the operation repeated, until the fourth lumbar 
has been treated in a similar manner. This treatment should 
only be given in case of diarrhea. 

In case of constipation, knead and manipulate the 
bowels. See Constipation (page 150). 

3. Flex the affected limb, slowly, but strongly, giving 
strong abduction of the knee as the limb is extended ; manip- 
ulate the musicles the entire length of the limb, deeply and 
thoroughly, being very particular in the region of the in- 
flamed and swollen joint. 

4. Place the hand under the patient's chin ; draw the 
head backward, rotating it from side to side; manipulate 
thoroughly all the muscles in the front and sides of the neck. 
This treatment, which frees and stimulates the pneumogas- 
tric nerve, together with strong treatment over the splanch- 
nic nerves in the spine, tends to equalize the action of the 
alimentary canal. 

Treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and 
should be given each day, until recovery. 



CONSTITUTIOXAL DISEASES. 305 

CHRONIC GOUT. 

(Results from repeated attacks of the acute form.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Deformity of affected joints, about which are deposits 
of sodium urate. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Gout (page 303). 

Treatment should be given eyerv other day. 

SCROFULA (CALLED ALSO KING'S EVIL). 
(A morbid constitutional condition, haying tubercle bacillus, 
associated ^\ith inflammation, caseation, and suppura- 
tion of the lymph-glands; generally hereditary; predis- 
posing the system to development of glandular tumors 
degenerating into ulcers; also to mesenteric and pul- 
monaihr consumption.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Similar to Lymphadenoma, and in addition the glands 
and surrounding connective tissues are inflamed, hot and 
tender to the touch, and adherent to the skin; cervical glands 
usually first involved. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Manipulate gently, but very thoroughly and deep, 
the muscles and glands in the affected region. 

2. See General Treatment (page 306), using such parts 
thereof, to free and stimulate the circulation through the 
entire system, as conditions would indicate. 

Treatment should be given every other day, and occupy 
fifteen or twenty minutes. 

-20- 



306 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

MYXEDEMA. 

(A cretinoid disease, due to affection of the thyroid gland, 
with mucus in the connective tissue; chiefly affecting 
women, rarely men or children.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Thyroid gland diminishes; swelling of the face, arms, 
and legs; memory enfeebled; heart enfeebled; movements 
clumsy; appetite and nutrition impaired. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease can be greatly benefited by a thorough 
General Treatment (see below), occupying fifteen to twenty 
minutes, every other day, to equalize the circulation nnd 
stimulate the digestive organs. 

GENERAL TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward, 
gently but very deep, the entire length of the spinal column, 
being very particular in all regions which appear tender to 
the touch, have an abnormal temperature, or where the 
muscles seem to be in a knotty, cord-like, or contracted con- 
dition. Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. With the patient on the back, place the hand lightly 
over the following organs, vibrating (pages 36 and 67) each 
two minutes, respectively: lungs, stomach, liver, pancreas, 
and kidneys. 

3. Flex the lower limbs, one at a time, against the 
abdomen, abducting the knee, and adducting the foot, 
strongly as the limb is extended with a light jerk. 

4. Grasping the limb around the thigh with both 
hands (cut 29), move the muscles very deeply from side to 



CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 307 

side the entire length of the limb. Treat the opposite limb 
in a similar manner. 

5. Place one hand upon patient's shoulder, pressing 
the muscles down toward the point of the acromion process; 
with the disengaged hand grasp the patient's elbow, rotating 
the arm around the head (cut 30). 

6. Holding the arm firmly with one hand, with the 
other rotate the muscles very deep the entire length of the 
arm; also grasp the hand, placing the disengaged hand 
under the axilla, and give strong extension. Treat the 
opposite arm in a similar manner. 

7. Plnce one hand under the chin, the other under 
the occipital, and give gentle but strong extension (cut 8). 

8. Place one hand under the chin, drawing the head 
backward and to the side; with the disengaged hand manipu- 
late the muscles which are thrown upon a strain. Treat 
the opposite side in a similar manner. Also manipulate, 
thoroughly and deep, the muscles in front of the neck. 

9. Place the patient upon a stool; the operator plac- 
ing the thumbs upon the angles of the second ribs, an assist- 
ant raising the arms slowly but strongly above the head 
as the patient inhales; press hard with the thumbs as the 
arms are lowered with a backward motion, patient relaxing 
all muscles and permitting elbows to bend; move the thumbs 
down to the next lower ribs; raise the arms as before; and 
repeat, until the fifth pair of ribs have been treated in a 
similar manner. 

10. In all cases of fever hold the vaso-motor center 
(cut 13) (^also see page 253). 

11. In cases of diarrhea place the patient face down- 
ward; while pressing hard upon the first lumbar vertebra, 
raise the limbs slowly but strongly as far as patient can 



308 OSTEOPATHY CO^fPLETE. 

stand; press also upon the second, third, and fourth lumbar, 
raising the limbs in a similar manner. In severe cases of 
dinrrhea it is also well to vibrate (pages 86 and 67) the 
bowels two minutes. 

12. Tn cases of constipation No. 11 should be omitted, 
and the Constipation Treatment (page 150) be substituted. 

HEMOPHILIA (SPONTANEOUS BLEEDING). 

(A hereditary morbid condition, characterized by tendency 
to excessive bleeding from the slightest wounds.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Slight scratches, wounds, or extraction of teeth are fol- 
lowed by severe hemorrhages. 
Not treated by osteopaths. 

SIMPLE GOITER. 

(Enlargement of the thyroid gland.) 

EXPLANATORY. 

The thyroid gland bears much resemblance in structure 
to other glandular organs, and was formerly classified to- 
gether with the thymus, suprarenal capsules, and spleen, 
under the head of ductless glands, since, when fully 
developed, it has no excretory duct. The thyroid varies in 
weight from one to two ounces. It is larger in the female 
than in the male, and slightlj' increases in size during men- 
struation. It is situated at the upper part of the trachea, 
and consists of two lateral tubes, placed one on each side 
of that tube and connected by a narrow transverse portion, 
the isthmus. The arteries supplying the thyroid are the 
superior and inferior thyroid, and sometimes a branch from 
the innominate artery or arch of the aorta. The arteries are 
remarkable for their large size and frequent anastomosis; 



CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 309 

the veins form a plexus on the surface of the gland and on 
the front of the trachea, from which rise the superior, middle, 
and inferior thyroid veins. The two former terminate in 
the internal jugular, the latter in the innominate vein. 

CAUSE. 

The thyroid gland is subject to enlargement, which is 
called goiter. For the relief of these growths various opera- 
tions have been resorted to, such as the injection of tincture 
of iodine or perchloride of iron, ligature of the thymus, and 
extirpation of a part or the whole of the thyroid gland. The 
thyroid gland having an unusually large blood-supply, it is 
but reasonable to suppose that an obstruction to its veins 
would necessitate an enlargment of the gland, or goiter. It 
is equally reasonable that if the obstruction is removed, the 
goiter will soon be taken up by absorption and disappear. 
Acting on tliese priuciples, we have cured many goiters, 
It will be observed that the clavicle is not nearly as 
prominent in people troubled with goiter as in those not 
afflicted with this disease. The contracting muscles and 
depressed clavicle, which are obstructing the escape of the 
blood from the thyroid gland, cause goiter. Raising the 
clavicle and stretching these muscles cures goiter, thus prov- 
ing our theory to be correct. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Stand behind the patient, and, extending the left 
arm around the neck, place the left thumb under the right 
clavicle at about its middle; grasp the patient's right wrist 
with the disengaged hand, raise the arm slowly above the 
head, and lower with a backward motion, at the same time 
springing the clavicle up with the thumb of the left hand; 
raise the left clavicle in like manner (cut 41). 



310 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

2. Place the patient on the back; with one hand under 
the chin, the other und(*r the back of the head, pull gently, 
rotating the head in any direction that will best stretch the 
muscles in the front and sides of the neck. 

3. Place the fingers below the goiter, pulling it upward 
and kneading it gently. 

This method will usually cure in from two to six weeks 
any goiter on which iodine has not been freely used. Treat- 
ment should be given every other day, and will not occupy 
over five minutes' time. 

FLESHY TUMORS. 

Fleshy tumors, like goiter, are caused by an obstruction 
to the veins draining any given part, and are easily cured 
by stretching and moving all the flesh and muscles in the 
immediate vicinity and kneading and moving the tumor in 
all directions. 

SCORBUTUS, OR SCURVY. 
(A disease characterized by tendency to hemorrhage of the 
membranes, by extravasation of the blood in livid spots 
under the skin, especially by spongy, swollen, and bleed- 
ing gums, but may be also of the bowels; and by great 
prostration, languor, and occasional rheumatic pains.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Skin dry and rough, purplish; breath fetid; pulse feeble 
and rapid; shortness of breath. 

TREATMENT. 

Discontinue the use of salted meats, and all highly 
seasoned food. Eat as large quantities of fresh fruit as 
possible, and let the diet consist mainly of vegetables, pota- 



CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 311 

toes and onions being one of the best preventives and cura- 
tives for this malady. 

The osteopath, being taught to view man as a machine, 
always seeks to remove the cause. In this instance, the 
cause being an improper diet, correcting the diet will cure 
the disease. 

PITRPTJIIA, LAND SCURVY, THE PURPLES, OR (CANA- 
DIAN) BLACKLEG. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Sometimes begins with a chill, and pain in the back 
and limbs; purple spots usually occur in successive crops, 
first red, then purple, brown, and yellow; no fever. 

TREATMENT. 

For treatment, see Scurvy (page 310). 
Take all needed rest, but exercise according to strength, 
and breathe fresh air. 



312 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 



Diseases of the Nervous System. 



NEURALGIA. 

(Pain in the course of a nerve.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Burmng or ishooting pain in the course of the affected 
nerve; parts may be anesthetic, but usually there is hyperes- 
thesia of the skin. Prolonged neuralgia may produce dis- 
turbance of nutrition. 

Neuralgia may be due to constitutional causes, such 
as gout or rheumatism; or some form of toxemia, as malaria; 
or condition of the blood, as anemia, 

TREATMENT. * 

Neuralgia of any part should be treated in a similar 
manner to Acute Articular Rheumatism (page 289) of that 
part. If in the face, thorough manipulation of the face and 
neck should be given; if in a limb, thoroiugh manipulation, 
extension, and flexion of that part should be applied. 

It is often advisable in neuralgia to give a thorough 
General Treatment (page W(\). 

This disease is sometimes cured in one or two treat- 
ments, in other instances baffling the skill of the most 
experienced operator. 

Treatment should be given each day. 




Cut 33.— Headache. 



DISEASES OF THE NERTOVS SYSTEM. 315 

TIC-DOULOTJRETJX. 

(A form of neuralgia involving the trigeminus nerve, and 

causing muscular twitching of the face.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the hand under the chin, the other under the 
occipital, and give thorough extension of the neck. 

2. Manipulate all muscles of the neck very thoroughly, 
working as far as possible with the fingers under the infe- 
rior maxillary. 

3. Place the finger-tips over the Gasserian ganglion 
(cut 49), and vibrate (pages 36 and 67) one minute. 

Treatment will occupy about ten minutes, and should be 
given every day, 

HEADACHE. 

(Pain in the head.) 

SYMPTOMS AND CAUSES. 

Gastric or dyspeptic headaches are often occipital, some- 
times frontal, and if accompanied by constipation, are dif- 
fuse and frontal. Uterine and ovarian headaches are occipi- 
tal and vertical. Nervous headaches are seated on the top of 
the head. 

If pulsating and throbbing, indicates vaso-motor dis- 
turbances; squeezing and pressing, nervous exhaustion or 
affection; sharp and boring, hysterical, neurotic, or epilep- 
tic; dull and heavy, toxic or dyspeptic; hot and burning, 
rheumatic or anemic. 

Headache, not caused by fevers, the stomach, or the 
uterus, can be almost instantly cured by stretching the neck 
and a pressure on the nerves at the base of the occipital bone. 



316 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the right hand on the back of the patient's 
neck, the thumb on one side and the fingers on the other, 
close to the head; place the left hand on the forehead, tipping 
the head backward gently, lifting quite strongly with the 
right arm, while rotating the head gently from side to side 
(see cut 34). 

2. Standing in front of the patient and tilting the 
head backward, gently hold the vaso-motor center (cut 35). 

3. Place one hand on the forehead, the other upon the 
back of the head, and press for several moments, hard. 

4. Standing behind the patient, with one hand on each 
side of the forehead, make five or six quick strokes. 

5. Place one finger on each temple, and, while press- 
ing, gently move the fingers from right to left with a circular 
motion. 

6. With the right hand raise patient's right arm high 
above the head, with the thumb of the left hand between 
the spine and the scapula, beginning at its upper angle, 
moving the muscles upward with a strong pressure at the 
same instant. 

This treatment will not occupy over ten minutes. First, 
second, and third will cure any ordinary headache, and the 
entire treatment will cure any case of headache, no matter 
how severe, if not caused by fevers, the stomach, or the 
uterus, in from five to ten minutes. 

Of the scores of cases cured by us, we will mention the 
case of a lady of Scammon. Kansas, who would have an 
attack of nervous headache once each week, lasting from 
two to four days; she suffered intense pain, the muscles 
contracting until they drew the head backward upon the 
neck. At these times electricity, hypodermic injections, and 
even chloroform, had failed to give relief. Being anxious 




Cut 34. — Headache. 




Cut 35. — Headache — Holding Vaso-Motor. 



DISEASES OF THE NERYOUS SYSTEM. 321 

to put our method to the severest test, we undertook her 
case, and were even more successful than we had dared to 
hope. In ten minutes she was sleeping quietly, apparently 
free from pain. In the morning a second light treatment 
was given, which gave her complete relief, and the continua- 
tion of the treatments for one month etfected a permanent 
cure. 

NERVOUS HEADACHE. 
TREATMENT. 

In addition to our Headache Treatment, place the 
patient on the face, and with the thumbs, beginning at the 
neck, press gently the entire length of the dorsal vertebrae, 
after which, if the patient has retired, hold the vaso-motor 
center a moment (cut 13), and in a few minutes your patient 
will be asleep. 

SICK HEADACHE. 
Sick headache being caused by a reflex action of the 
pneumogastric and splanchnic nerves, the stomach is at fault; 
we must first reach that organ through the splanchnic nerves. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the back ; reaching over as , 
in cut 21, with the fingers pressing hard on each side of the 
spine, beginning between the lower angle of the scapula and 
ending as low as the last dorsal vertebra, lift the patient 
gently with your fingers; then, moving down the breadth 
of the hands, repeat the application, thus desensitizing the 
splanchnic nerves. 

2. Press gently at first, then gradually harder, over 
the pit of the stomach. 

3. Give our regular Headache Treatment. 

It will take from ten to fifteen minutes to give this treat- 

-21— 



322 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ment, at which time the patient will be improving, although 
it may be some time before the pain entirely abates. 

A continuation of this treatment every second day will 
cure the most aggravated cases of chronic sick headache. 

MIGRAINE, MEGRIM, OR SUN-PAIN. 

(Paroxysmal neurosis, with unilateral headache.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Nausea; vomiting; derangement of vision and sensation; 
tingling and numbness. More common in females. 

-: TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon a. chair; the operator, stand- 
ing behind, places the right hand upon top of patient's head, 
and the thumb of the left hand close to the spine of the 
seventh cervical vertebra on the right side; bend the head 
forward as far as possible, rotating it gently, but as far 
as possible to the left ; press hard with the thumb, endeavor- 
ing to push the muscles as far as possible from the spine, as 
the head is returned, by reversing the rotation, to its normal 
position (cut 33); move the thumb up to the next cervical, 
rotate the head as before; and repeat, until the occipital 
is reached. Treat the opposite side of the neck in a similar 
manner. 

2. Place the thumbs upon each side of the first dorsal 
vertebra, the fingers resting upon the patient's shoulders, 
and move the muscles upward and outward with the thumbs 
as low as the fourth dorsal vertebra. 

3. Place the patient on the back; with one hand under 
the chin, the other under the occipital, give gentle extension 
and rotation of the neck. 

4. Place the finger-tips over the Gasserian ganglion 
(cut 49), and vibrate (pages 36 and 67) one minute. 



DISEASES OF TEE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 323 

5. Place the hands on the sides of the neck, fingers 
almost meeting over the upper cervicals ; tip the head back- 
ward, pressing gently witli the fingers three or four minutes. 

Treatment will occupy about ten minutes, and should be 
given each day. 

SINGULTUS, OR HICCUP (HICCOUGH). 

(A short, sharp clicking or catching sound, due to sudden 
arrest of breathing, by a momentary spasmodic contrac- 
tion of the diaphragm and a simultaneous contraction of 
the glottis.) 

EXPLANATORY. 

The diaphragm is the principal muscle of inspiration, 
placed obliquely at the junction of the upper with the middle 
third of the trunk, and separating the thorax from the abdo- 
men, forming the floor of the former cavity and the roof of 
the latter. When in a condition of rest, the muscle presents 
a domed surface with the concave toward the abdomen; when 
the fibers contract, they become less arched, or nearly 
straight, and in consequence the level of the chest wall is 
lowered, the vertical diameter of the chest being proportion- 
ally increased, thus permitting the lungs to fill with air; 
when, at the end of the inspiration, the diaphragm relaxes, 
the thoracic walls return to their natural position in con- 
sequence of their elastic reaction and of the elasticity and 
weight of the displaced viscera. In all expulsive acts the 
diaphragm is called into action; thus before sneezing, cough- 
ing, laughing, crying, or vomiting a deep inspiration takes 
place. The phrenic nerve, which may be reached by a press- 
ure in front of the third, fourth, and fifth cervical vertebrie, 
controls the action of the diaphragm. Thus viewing that 
great muscle of inspiration as a machine, whose action is 



324 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

controlled by the brain through the phrenic nerve, we are 
enabled to instantly cure hiccup. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Stand behind the patient and with the fingers of 
each hand push the muscles at the side of the neck forward 
and press gently on the front of the transverse processes of 
the third, fourth, and fifth cervical vertebrae (cut 12). 

2. Place the knep between the patient's shoulders and 
raise the arms high above the head, lifting strongly (cut 5). 

This will instantly cure any case of hiccup not caused 
by approaching death. 

NEUROMATA. 

(Tumor of a nerve.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Darting and shooting pain ; paresthesia and anesthesia ; 
muscular spasms; paresis, which deepens into paralysis. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Manipulate the muscles very gently and carefully m 
in the immediate region of the tumor, endeavoring as far as 
possible to give extension. 

2. Place the hand or finger-tips over the tumor, and 
vibrate (pages o6 and 67) gently two minutes. _ 

Treatment should be given each day. 

NEURITIS. 

(Inflammation of a nerve. May be acute or chronic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Boring or burning pain, increased by movement, press- 
ure, or position, and may extend to structures supplied by 



DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 325 

the nerve; skin over affected parts red, and may be edema- 
tous; wasting of the muscles; paresis or paralysis; may be 
eruptions in the course of the nerve. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Manipulate very gently and carefully the muscles 
surrounding the diseased nerve, giving as much extension as 
possible. 

2. Vibrate (pages 36 and 67) one minute over the seat 
of pain. 

Treatment should be given each day. 

MULTIPLE NEURITIS. 
(Simultaneous inflammation of many nerves.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Most frequently attacks nerves of the arms and legs. 
pain; swelling; tenderness; tingling; numbness. The 
affected muscles lose power, waste, and show degenerative 
reaction. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease should be treated in a similar manner to 
Acute Articular Rheumatism (page 289), manipulating the 
muscles in the regions of the inflamed nerves gently but 
thoroughly; also giving thorough extension. 

In acute cases treatment should be given every day, and 
in chronic cases every other day is sufficient. 

NEURO-PARALYTIC HYPEREMIA. 

(Excess of blood in the part, due to destruction of certain 

sympathetic or mixed nerves.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Destruction of the cervical sympathetic nerves by 

wound, tumor, or abscess, produces hyperemia of the side of 



326 OSTEOPATHY COSTPLETE. 

the face ; parts are swollen, red, and hot ; elevation of tem- 
perature; and contraction of the pupil. 
No cure in Osteopathy. 

PARESIS. 

(Partial paralysis, affecting muscular motion, but not 

sensation.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Weakness of the muscles, with certain motions still 
possible. 

-: TREATMENT. 

See Paralysis (page 828). 

PARALYSIS, OR PALSY. 

(Loss or material diminution of the power of contractility in 
the voluntary or involuntary muscles, and sometimes of 
the power of perceiving sensation, in one or more parts 
of the body.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Palsy, is a disease principally affecting the nervous 
system, characterized by a loss or diminution of motion or 
feeling or of both in one or more parts of the body. When 
one entire side of the body from the head downward is 
affected, it is distinguished among professional men by the 
name of hemiplegia ; if the lower half of the body be attacked 
by the disease, it is named paraplegia; and when confiued to 
a jfarticular limb or set of muscles, it is called paralysis. 
Palsy usually comes on with a sudden and immediate loss of 
motion and sensibility of the parts. It is sometimes pre- 
ceded by a numbness, coldness, and paleness, and some- 
times by slight convulsive twitches. When the head is 



DISEASES OF THE XERTOVS SYSTEM. . 327 

much affected, tlie eye and mouth are drawu to one side, the 
memory and judgment are much impaired, and the speech 
indistinct; if the extremities are affected, it not only produces 
a loss of motion and sensibility, but a wasting of the muscles 
of the affected parts. The attack is usually preceded by 
some of these symptoms, but occasionally the disease ad- 
vances more slowly; a finger, hand, or arm, or the muscles 
of the tongue, of the mouth, or of the eyelids, being first 
affected. 

CAUSE. 

Paralysis in its various forms, while stubborn, can in- 
variably be cured by our method if taken in time, and even 
in its last stages great good may be done the patient. 
Osteopathy is the only rational method of treating this 
disease. It is caused by a 'pressure on some of the various 
nerve-centers, or paralysis of any part may be caused by 
pressure on the nerves which control that part. The brain, 
spinal cord, and nerves may justly be compared to an im- 
mense telegraph system, the nerves carrying messages to and 
from the brain. 

That the average reader may have a more correct under- 
standing of the nervous system, of the power which causes 
the heart to beat, the blood to flow, the lungs to inhale, the 
alimentary canal to perform its allotted task, and the 
muscles to act, let us dwell for a moment on the brain, the 
spinal cord, and the vertebral or spinal column, as it is on 
this line of thought that w^e must reach paralysis. 

The nervous system is composed — 

First: Of a series of large centers of nerve-matter, 
called collectively the cerebro-spinal center or axis. 

Second: Of smaller centers, called ganglia. 

Third: Of nerves connected either with the cerebro- 
spinal axis or ganglia; and 



328 . OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

Fourth: Of certain modifications of tlie peripheral 
terminations of the nerves, forming the organs of external 
sense. 

The cerebro-spinal center consists of two parts, the 
spinal cord and encephalon, or brain ; the latter may be sub- 
divided into the cerebrum, cerebellum, pons varolii, and the 
medulla oblongata. 

The spine is a flexible and flexuous column, composed of 
thirty-three separate and distinct bones in the child, and 
twenty-six in the adult, articulating with each other and the 
ribs, enclosing and protecting tiie spinal cord, supporting the 
head an4 trunk, and permitting the escape through its 
numerous foramina of the nerves which control the body. 
Is not this indeed a grand and wonderful piece of mechan- 
ism? So strong, so delicate, so perfect! 

It is to this part of the human machinery that we trace 
half the ills that flesh is heir to. It is here that we find 
centers on which a simple pressure of the hand will cure 
cholera morbus, flux, cramp in the stomach, vomiting, etc., 
and it is here we must search for the cause and cure of 
paralysis. 

HOV/ TO MAKE THE EXAMINATION. 

Place the patient on his face and carefully examine the 
spine; in perfect health the vertebrae are all in line. If you 
find one of the spinous processes a little out of line, you 
have discovered the cause. It may be the result of an 
accident, it may be turned slightly out of its normal position 
by a contracted muscle; be that as it may, we have here a 
pressure on the spinal cord, causing partial or complete 
paralysis. 

TREATMENT. 
1, Free the muscles thoroughly (as shown in cut 7) 
on each side of the spine the entire length, particularly at 
the seat of trouble. 



DISEASES OF THE NERYOVS SYSTEM. 329 

2. Let one assistant now take the patient's shoulders, 
another his feet, and pull steadily, slowly, and strongly, 
while the third presses the spinous process back in its place. 
It may take several treatments, but you will gain a little 
every time and finally succeed. There is absolutely no 
danger connected with this treatment if ordinary care is 
used. 

3. Place the patient on his back; with one hand under 
the chin and the other under the back of the head, pull 
steadily until the body moves. This must not be omitted, as 
it starts up circulation in the spinal cord, and even reaches 
the brain. 

4. Kaise the arms and ribs as in cut 4. 

5. Treat the limbs for circulation. 

6. Stretch the great sciatic: the largest nerve in the 
body, measuring three-quarters of an inch in breadth, and 
which is the continuation of the lower part of the sacral 
plexus; it passes out of the pelvis through the great sacro- 
sciatic foramen below the pyriformis muscle and descends 
between the great trochanter and the tuberosity of the isch- 
ium, along the back of the thigh, to about its middle third, 
where it divides into two large branches, the internal and 
external popliteal nerves. 

To stretch, the sciatic nerve, place the patient on his 
back, stand at the side of the table, and grasp with the right 
hand the right ankle, your left hand resting lightly on the 
patient's knee; now flex the leg slowly against the abdomen 
as far as possible, using as much strength as the patient can 
stand (see cut .32). While in this position move the knee 
three or four times from right to left, without relaxing the 
pressure; now slowly extend the leg, throwing the knee to 
the right, the foot to the left, as shown in cufSO. This should 
be repeated two or three times, and be reversed occasionally. 



330 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

throwing the knee to the left and the foot to the right. Treat 
the left limb in a similar manner. 

A treatment should not occupy over fifteen minutes, and 
should be given every day. 

This treatment will benefit and usually cure paralysis in 
any of its varied forms. If no dislocation is found, give the 
same treatment, as you may have overlooked it, and simply 
stretching the body will allow a very slight dislocation to 
slip back and free the spinal cord. 

Of the numerous cases of paralysis successfully treated 
by us, w^e might mention a little girl at Benjamin, northeast- 
ern Missouri. She had been a bright, active child until two 
weeks before she was brought to us for treatment, when it 
was noticed that she was losing the use of her lower limbs. 
We explained to the mother the cause of the trouble, a slip 
in the lumbar vertebrae throwing a pressure on the spinal 
cord, thus partially cutting off communication between the 
limbs and the brain. Her old family doctor insisted that the 
child had worms, and treated her for the same for four 
weeks, when the little sufferer had entirely lost the use of 
her lower extremities; he turned her over to us with the 
remark that he did not understand the case'. After four 
treatments as laid down in this work, the child could walk, 
and in three weeks was romping with her playmates. 

We will refer also to the case of a young lady of Galena, 
Kansas, suffering from creeping paralysis, or locomotor 
ataxia. This dread malady is caused by a diseased condition 
of the posterior column of the spinal cord, and our treatment, 
stretching and rotating the spine thoroughly, frees the cord 
and starts the circulation. The young lady in question was 
not only perfectly helpless, but her digestive organs and 
kidnevs failed to..act. In connection with our usual Paraly- 
sis Treatment, we gave the Kidney and Constipation Treat- 




Cut 36. — Freeing the Circulation 



DISEASES OF THE XERVOL"^ ST STEM. 333 

ment. In a short time the lady could walk with assistance, 
and in two months was on the high road to perfect health. 

ATROPHY (SHRINKING OF MUSCLES). 

Atrophy of any part might well be mentioned at this 
time, it being a form of paralysis. It will be remembered 
that we mentioned the fact of the nerves controlling the 
caliber of the arteries, thus regulating the blood-supply. In 
atrophy we are confronted with a condition in which the 
nerves controlling the arteries which feed the withered 
parts are interfered with. The wires are down and the cry 
of hunger from the starving muscles never reaches the 
brain. 

But even assuming that the brain is apprised of the 
fact that certain muscles are starving, that they need more 
blood, its message to the arteries to expand never reaches its 
destination. If it is the muscles of the leg that are starving, 
why not flex the leg upon the abdomen (see cut 3G), rotating 
it inward and outward, thereby stretching the muscles and 
freeing and stretching the nerves at fault? We have abso- 
lutely never known this method to fail to restore shrinking 
limbs to their normal size. We have cured case after case 
by this simple, reliable, and infallible method, and there is 
no reason why any of our readers should not be equally suc- 
cessful in cases not complicated. 

A good general rule in all cases of atrophy of the mus- 
cles is to use the affected member as a lever with which to 
stretch the muscles connecting it to the body in all possible 
directions, as it is here the obstruction is usually found, and 
by acting on these principles you will stretch the right 
muscle, thus freeing the nerve and permitting the blood to 
pass down and nourish the affected parts. It is simply won- 
derful how quick Nature will respond. If a measurement of 



334 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

Ihe shrunken member is taken, you will know exactly how 
fast you are progressing; and we venture the assertion that 
in one month, giving a treatment every other day, you will 
have gained from one to two inches. 

One old gentleman treated by us in Baxter Springs, 
Kansas, whose leg had been shrunken for years, grew an 
inch and a half in one month's treatment, measured 
around the ankle. Another, a young man of the same city, 
had his arm restored to usefulness in the same remarkable 
yet simple manner. We would not be understood as saying 
the limb will gain much in length in the adult; the great 
improvement will be noticed in size and strength. 

SPINAL ANEMIA. 
(Deficiency of blood in the spinal cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Difficult to distinguish, except when associated with 
general anemia, or caused by sudden hemorrhage; paresis of 
the muscles; aching in the legs; and may be w^asting of the 
extremities. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon the back; one operator 
grasping the shoulders, the other the feet, give very thorough 
extension of the spine, continued one minute, pulling as hard 
as the patient can stand. 

2. Place one hand under the chin, the other imder 
tlie occipital; an assistant holding the feet, pull slowl;v but 
strongly one minute, being careful not to rotate the head. 

3. Place the patient upon the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward very 
deeply the entire length of the spinal column. 

The above treatments free the entire circulation to the 
spinal cord. 



DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTE3I. 335 

4. It is always well to give flexion, extension, rota- 
tion, and manipulation to the limbs, if the condition would 
indicate the need of such treatment. 

Treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and should 
be given every other day until recovery. 

SPINAL HYPEREMIA. 

(Excess of blood in the spinal cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Feeling of fullness, weight, or aching in the back; motor 
weakness and feeling of heaviness in the limbs, relieved 
when the patient lies down. 

TREATMENT. 

See Spinal Anemia (page 3.^4). 

This disease being an excess of blood in the spinal cord, 
it is obvious that freeing the entire circulation to and from 
the spine would be efficacious, the object of the osteopath 
being always to remove the cause. 

ACUTE SPINAL MENINGITIS. 
(Inflammation of the spinal meninges.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pain in the back, increased by motion or pressure; 
numbness; tingling; twitching and spasms, accompanied by 
pain; rigidity of muscles; fingers drawn over the skin leave 
red streaks. 

TREATMENT. 

See Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis (page 263). 



336 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CHRONIC SPINAL MENINGITIS. 

(May follow acute attack.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Same as acute form, but less painful, of longer duration, 
and may be irritation of the bead. 

TREATMENT. 

See Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis (page 263). 

CERVICAL PACHYMENINGITIS. 

(Inflammation of the dura mater in the cervical region.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain in back of head, neck, shoulders, and arms; wast- 
ing of groups of muscles of the arms and hands. May lead 
to deformity. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the back; one hand under the 
chin, the other under the occipital, give thorough extension 
of the neck, pulling until the body moves; also give gentle 
extension, at the same moment rotating the head quite 
strongly from side to side. 

2. Place the left hand on top of patient's head, the 
right arm and hand under patient's head and neck, the fin- 
gers between the scapulse, two on each side of the fourth or 
fifth dorsal; press hard with the ends of the fingers, moving 
the muscles toward the head, at the same instant pressing 
hard with the left hand upon and rotating the head, which 
should be continued, the fingers of the right hand gradually 
working towards the upper cervicals, until the first cervical 
is reached (cut 46). 

3. Place the left hand under patient's shoulder, the 



DISEASES OF THE NERTOUS SYSTEM. 337 

fingers upon the right side of the first dorsal vertebra, and 
close to the spine; draw the right arm slowly and strongly 
above the head, lower the arm with a backward motion, 
pressing hard with the fingers at the same instant; move 
the fingers down to the next dorsal, raise the arm as before, 
and repeat until the sixth dorsal is reached. Treat the 
opposite side in a similar manner. 

4. Place the hand upon the sides of the neck, the fin- 
gers almost meeting over the upper cervicals; tip the head 
backward, pressing quite hard with the fingers three or four 
minutes. 

Treatment should be given each day, and will occupy 
about fifteen minutes. 

EXTRA-MENINGEAL HEMORRHAGE. 
(Hemorrhage between the dura mater and the vertebrne, due 
to traumatism, convulsion, violent exertion, or rupture 
of an aneurism.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Resemble those of Spinal Meningitis, but are more sud- 
den and violent; no fever; pain in the back opposite the 
hemorrhage; may be paresis, or paraplegia. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

SPINAL COMPRESSION. 

(Compression of the spinal cord, due to tumor, disloca- 
tion, fracture, etc.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Local pain in back, aggravated by movement; loss of 
motion in parts supplied by the nerves which originate below 
the compression ; increase of reflexes. 

—22— 



338 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Gentle and thorough manipulation of the muscles 
of the back in the region of the compression. 

2. If due to a dislocation, place patient on the face; 
one assistant holds the shoulders, while a second grasps a 
limb, giving strong extension, at the same time also moving 
the body gently in such a manner as may be directed by the 
operator, who, with thumbs upon the dislocated vertebra, 
works it gently back to its normal position (cut 37). 

Many remarkable cures have been effected in this 
manner. 

The' following account of the marvelous cure of John 
Richter, of Osawatomie, by Dr. O. C. Payne, a graduate of 
Dr. E. D. Barber's National School of Osteopathy at Baxter 
Springs, Kansas, appeared in the Osawatomie Glohe of 
February 6, 1896: 

''Three months ago John Richter, a boiler-maker, in the 
employ of the Missouri Pacific at this place, was seized with a 
peculiar malady and became helpless. He was practically 
paralyzed from the knees down and from the elbows down to 
the finger-tips. His limbs were numb and he could not use 
his hands or feet. He went to Kansas City about the first of 
December and entered the company hospital at that place. 
He was placed in charge of a renowned specialist, who pro- 
nounced his trouble 'locomotor ataxia.' The specialist did 
everything known to science for the relief of Mr. Richter, but 
without any good results. Richter grew rapidly worse, when, 
* after eight weeks of treatment, he was informed that he was 
beyond human help and would be a hopeless invalid the rest 
of his days, which could not be long. He came home a week 
ago and was placed under the care of O. C. Payne, the osteo- 
path who has created such a sensation in this section for sev- 




Cut 37. — Reducing a Spinal Dislocation. 



DISEASES OF TSE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 341 

eral months by performing numerous cures without the use 
of medicine. The Globe, from time to time, has given the 
public full details of his system of practice, and a small por- 
tion of the remarkable results in performing cures. Dr. 
Payne diagnosed Richter's case and quickly determined that 
he was not suffering from locomotor ataxia, but from a spinal 
injury caused by concussion. He began operations on him 
and yesterday gave him the fifth treatment, and, strange to 
relate, Eichter is on the high road to recovery. He was 
assisted by friends to get up to Payne's office Tuesday week, 
and used a crutch. Yesterday he walked firmly up stairs 
alone and unattended, and confidently believes he could walk 
several miles, and expects to report ready for duty as boiler- 
maker in a few days. Richter is the happiest fellow in Osa- 
watomie. Two weeks ago a cheerless, helpless future was 
all he could see, but to-day he is so near a well man again 
and is progressing so finely that he wants to place the credit 
where it is due, and credits skillful Dr. Payne for his restora- 
tion to health." 

SPINAL TUMOR. 

(Tumor of the spinal cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain and gradual paralysis; muscular spasms; girdle 
sensation; atrophy; pains darting, shooting, and par- 
oxysmal. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Very thorough, deep, and careful manipulation of 
the muscles in the region of the tumor. 

2. Thorough extension of the spinal column. 

3. Vibration (pages .36 and 67) over tumor two minutes. 



342 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

SYRINGOMYELIA. 

(Abnormal dilatation of the central canal of the spinal cord, 
having abnormal cavities in the spinal marrow, due to 
the breaking down of its substance.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Muscular weakness and wasting; alteration of sensa- 
tion; sense of cold, heat, and pain are lost; sphincters 
usually involved. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

ACUTE MYELITIS. 
(Inflammation of the spinal cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Elevation of temperature; pain in the back; loss of 
motion and sensation of parts supplied by the nerve arising 
below the seat of inflammation; reflexes in the distribution 
of the nerves arising from the inflamed region are lost, also 
control of the sphincter. More common in males. 

CAUSE. 

This disease is caused by an obstruction of the circula- 
tion from the spinal cord. 

TREATMENT. 

Can be cured by such extension and manipulation as 
will best tend to free the circulation, thus reducing the 
inflammation of the cord. 

See Spinal Anemia (page 3.34). 



DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 343 

CHRONIC MYELITIS. 
(May follow acute myelitis or chronic meningitis.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Impairment of motion and sensation; dull pain in the 
legs; a decided girdle sensation; exaggeration of the 
reflexes; sphincters iuTolved; of long duration. 

TKEATMENT. 

This disease may be benefited by a thorough manipula- 
tion and extension of the spine. 
See Spinal Anemia (}>age 334). 

HEMATOMYELIA. 
(Hemorrhage of the spinal cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Sudden severe pain in the back; loss of motion, sensa- 
tion, and perhaps consciousness; girdle sensation; sphinc- 
ters likely deranged. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

ANTERIOR POLIOMYELITIS. 
(Inflammation of the anterior horns of the gray matter of the 

cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Onset sudden, may be marked by fever and complete 
paralysis, which abates, leaving certain muscles paralyzed; 
sensation and sphincters are undisturbed. Most common 
in children and in the summer. 

TREATMENT. 
Thorough manipulation and extension of the spine, with 



344 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

a view of freeing the circulation and thereby reducing the 
inflammation. 

See Spinal Anemia (page 334). 

LOCOMOTOR ATAXIA, OR POSTERIOR SPINAL SCLEROSIS. 

(Degeneration of the posterior column of the cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Lightning pains in the legs; absence of knee jerk; inco- 
ordination of movements, without paralysis or muscular 
wasting; unsteadiness of gait; girdle sensation; pupils do 
not respond to light; loss of sexual power. More common in 
males. 

TREATMEIS^T. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward, 
thoroughly and very deep, the entire length of the spinal 
column. Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Grrasping the j)atient beneath the shoulders, i:i the 
axilla, as he lies on the back, an assistant grasping the 
feet, give thorough extension of the spine, pulling hard one 
minute. 

3. Place the patient upon a stool; the thumbs of the 
operator upon the angles of the second ribs, an assistant rais- 
ing the arms high above the head, press hard with the 
thumbs as the arms are lowered with a backward motion 
(cut 11) move the thumbs down to the next lower ribs; raise 
the arms as before, and repeat until the eighth dorsal verte- 
bra is reached. 

4. Kneeling behind the patient, place the thumb 
of the left hand upon the right transverse process of the 
ninth dorsal vertebra; an assistant standing in front, places 




Cut 38.— Locomotor Ataxia. 



DISEASES OF THE XEFTOVS SYSTEM. 347 

the hands upon the patient's shoulders and rotates the body 
as far as possible to the right; as the body turns, press very 
hard with the thumb of the left hand (cut 38); place the 
thumb of the right hand upon the left transverse process of 
the next lower vertebra, press hard as the body is rotated 
slowly as far as possible to the left, the patient relaxing all 
muscles; work in this manner until the last lumbar vertebra 
is reached. 

0. If the patient is constipated, very thorough Treat-, 
nient for Constipation (page 107) should be given, 

(>. Flex the limbs very strongly against the chest, 
giving strong abduction, and extending with a light jerk. 

Treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and should 
be given every other day. 

A decided improvement should be noticed during the 
first month's treatment, and a cure should be efl'ected in 
from three to six months. 

Osteopaths are very successful in the treatment of this 
disease, always benefiting the patient, and curing most cases, 
not the result of syphilitic troubles. 

PRIMARY SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA. 

(Degeneration of the pj^amidal tract of the spinal cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Loss of motion in the lower extremities; absence of wast- 
ing; sphincters involved, but not sensation; exaggerated 
reflexes; and spasmodic contraction of the muscles. 

TEEATMENT. 

See Locomotor Ataxia !})age 344). 



348 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CONGENITAL SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA. 

(Degeneration of the pyramidal tracts of the cord, due to 
injury of the child during birth.) 

. SYMPTOMS. 

Child late in learning to walk; peculiar gait; one foot 
being placed over or in front of the other; growth may be 
retarded; may be convulsions; defective mental development. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

ATAXIC PARAPLEGIA, OR PRIMARY LATERAL 
SCLEROSIS. 

(Degeneration of the posterior and lateral columns of the 

spinal cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Loss of motion and coordinating powers; absence of 
lightning pains; muscular reflexes preserved, and muscles 
do not atrophy; may be lack of control of sphincters; may 
be dull pains in the back and legs; sexual power lost. 

TREATMENT. 

See Locomotor Ataxia (page 344). 

HEREDITARY ATAXIA, OR FRIEDREICH'S DISEASE. 

(Degeneration of the posterior and lateral columns of the 
spinal cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Most frequent about the period of puberty; arms and 
speech involved; lightning pains absent; incoordination first 
in the legs, then in the arms; muscular reflexes abolished; 
oscillatorv movements of the eveballs. 



DISEASES OF THE yERYOUS STSTEIT. 349 

TREATMENT. 

See Locomotor Ataxia (page 344). 

PROGRESSIVE MUSCULAR ATROPHY, OR AMYOTROPHIC 
LATERAL SCLEROSIS. 

(Degeneration of the multipolar cells in the gray matter of 
the anterior horns of the pyramidal tracts.j 

SYMPTOMS. 

rsuallv attacks an arm first, and muscles of either hand 
or shoulder, next the leg; feeling of soreness and weakness; 
atrophy steadily progresive; respiration embarrassed, as 
the diaphragm becomes involved; sphincters not usually 
involved, but loss of sexual power, 

TREATMENT. 

See Locomotor Ataxia (page 344). 

2. Place the hands under the chin and occipital bone; 
give very strong extension of the neck, being careful not to 
rotate the head. 

3. Give gentle extension of the neck, at the same 
time rotating the head as far as possible from side to side; 
also manipulate thoroughly all muscles of the neck. 

4. Manipulate in a very thorough manner the limbs 
in which atrophy has made its appearance, giving flexion, 
extension, and rotation of the member. 

Treatment will occupy about twenty minutes, and 
should.be given every other day, 

PSEUDO-HYPERTROPHIC MUSCULAR PARALYSIS. 
(Loss of power of motion, with hypertrophy of muscles.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Appears usually in childhood; may be congenital; calf 
muscles first involved; stumbles and falls on attempting to 



350 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

run; ga^trocnemii much enlarged; otlier muscles gradually 
become involved; finally wasting of the latissimus dorsi and 
lower part of the pectoralis major. 

TREATMENT. 

If this disease is taken in its early stages, it can be 
cured by thorough extension and rotation of the spine, with 
thorough manipulation of the muscles involved, thus freeing 
the circulation to the spinal cord, also between the muscles 
involved and the heart. 

See Progressive Muscular Atrophy (page 349). 

' SIMPLE IDIOPATHIC MIJSCULAK ATROPHY. 

(Similar to Pseudo-Hypertrophic form, except muscles do 
not hypertrophy.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

W^asting in arms, legs, and face, gradually extending 
to the rest of the body; reflexes enfeebled; deformities result. 

TREATMENT. 

See Progressive Muscular Atrophy (page 349). 

ARTHRITIC MUSCULAR ATROPHY. 

(Wasting of the muscles about a joint.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

In the course of inflammation of a joint the contiguous 
muscles undergo a varjdng degree of atrophy, usually involv- 
ing the extensors; if the arthritis continues for a long 
period, the reflexes in the region are heightened. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Thorough extension of the spine, and rotation. 

2. Flex the limb strongly against the abdomen, giv- 
ing strong abduction as the limb is extended; also manipu- 



DISEASES OF THE yERYOUS SYSTEM. 351 

late the muscles thoroughly and deep the entire length of 
the limb, being exceedingly thorough with the atrophied 
muscles. 

3. Should the atrophy be in the arm, place the thumb 
of one hand just above the first dorsal, upon the side of the 
spine where the atrophy exists, raise the shrunken arm 
gently byt strongly above the head, and press hard with the 
thumb, moving the muscles upward, as the arm is lowered 
with a backward motion ; move the thumb down to the next 
vertebra and raise the arm, and repeat until the lower bor- 
der of the scapula is reached. 

4. Give thorough extension of the neck, manipulating 
all muscles in the back and sides of the neck. 

5. Extend the arm, manipulating the muscles thor- 
oughly and deep its entire length, being very thorough in 
the atrophied region. 

Treatment should be given every other day. 

MYOTONIA CONGENITA, OR THOMSEN'S DISEASE. 

(Congenital affection of the muscles.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Muscular spasms on moving after rest, which relaxes 
if movement is continued; spasms intensify by emotion or 
fear. 

TREATMENT. 

This trouble is sometimes benefited by extension, rota- 
tion, and manipulation of the spine and muscles. 
See Arthritic Muscular Atrophy (page 3.50). 



352 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ANALGESIC PANARIS, OR MORVAN'S DISEASE. 

(Painless inflammation and necrosis of the fingers.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pain, followed by analgesia and necrosis; usually curva- 
ture of the spine. 

Not treated by osteopaths. 

ACUTE ASCENDING PARALYSIS. 

(Rapid and progressive paralysis, beginning in the feet and 

extending upward.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Muscles of the trunk, chest, arms, and neck involved; 
swallowing and speech may be abolished; sensation unaf- 
fected; reflexes enfeebled. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Locomotor Ataxia (page 344). 

1. Place the patient upon the back; with one hand 
under the chin, the other under the occipital, give thorough 
and strong extension of the neck. 

2. Give gentle extension of the neck, rotating the 
head gently but strongly from side to side ; also manipulate 
thoroughly all muscles of the neck. 

The limbs should be flexed, rotated, and the muscles 
manipulated in a very thorough manner. 

CEREBRAL ANEMIA. 
(Deficiency of blood in the brain.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Syncope; failure of vision ; ringing in the ears; nausea; 
vertigo; pallor of the face; loss of consciousness; nystagmus; 
and may be convulsions. 



DISEASES OF THE NERVODS SYSTEM. 353 

TKEATMENT. 

1. Place the hands under the chin and occipital, giv- 
ing gentle extension and rotation to the neck. 

2. Manipulate very thoroughly and deeply all the mus- 
cles of the neck, being very particular in the region of the 
large arteries that supply the head, thus freeing the circula- 
tion to the brain. 

3. Place the patient upon a stool; the thumbs of the 
operator close to the spinal process of the seventh cervical, 
the fingers resting upon patient's shoulders, with the thumbs 
pressing hard, move the muscles upward and outward as low 
as the fifth dorsal vertebra. 

4. Place the knee between the scapulae, about the 
third or fourth dorsal vertebra, raise the arms strongly above 
the head as the patient inhales, and lower the arms with a 
backward motion, pressing hard with the knee at the same 
instant. 

Treatment will occupy about ten minutes, and should 
be given each day until recovery. 

CEREBRAL HYPEREMIA. 

(Excess of blood in the brain.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Dull headache, with feeling of fullness; florid com- 
plexion; slight dizziness; flashes of light; and may be loss 
of consciousness. 

TREATMENT. 

Thorough General Treatment (page 306) to equalize the 
circulation. 

Treatment should be given each day until recovery. 

—23- 



354 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CEEEBRAL MENINGITIS. 

(Inflammation of the cerebral meninges.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Headache; vomiting; convulsions; delirium; stiffness 
of muscles of back of the neck ; coma ; and paralysis. 

TREATMENT. 
See Brain Fever (page 27<>). 

CEREBRAL TUBERCULAR MENINGITIS. 

(Inflammation of the cerebral meninges, associated with 

tubercle bacillus.) 

SY3iIPT0MS. 

Emaciation; peevishness; evening fever; evidence of 
tubercle elsewhere; headache; causeless vomiting; consti- 
pation; nightmare; irregular pulse; strabismus. Usually 
in children. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

CEREBRITIS, ENCEPHALITIS, OR PHRENITIS. 

(Inflammation of the brain structure.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Fever; convulsions; headache; vertigo; and delirium. 

TREATMENT. 

See Brain Fever (page 276). 

APOPLEXY, OR CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE. 

(Paralysis from rupture of a cerebral blood-vessel.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Loss of consciousness; muscular relaxation; tempera- 
ture depressed; pulse slow, hard, and full; reflexes abol- 



DISEA8ES OF THE NERVOVhl SYSTEM. 355 

ished; may be convulsions, as consciousness returns; usually 
face, arms, and legs are paralyzed on the opposite side to the 
lesion; phonation and articulation affected. 

TREATMENT. 

This trouble can be greatly benefited by thorough Gen- 
eral Treatment (page 306), omitting Xo. 9. 
Treatment should be given each day. 

CEREBRAL EMBOLISM AND THROMBOSIS. 

(Plugging of a cerebral blood-vessel.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Loss of consciousness; sometimes convulsions; spas- 
modic disorder of movements; numbness; tingling; vertigo; 
and headache. 

TREATMENT. 

Benefited by General Treatment (page 306), omitting 
No. 9; given each day. 

ACUTE CEREBRAL SOFTENING. 
(Softening of brain, as result of embolism or thrombosis.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Resemble those of apoplexy; loss of consciousness not 
usually so profound, or as long in duration; coma and 
convulsions. 

TREATMENT. 

Sometimes benefited by General Treatment (page 306), 
omitting No. 9. 



356 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CHRONIC CEREBRAL SOFTENING. 

(Affection of the degenerative period of life.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Impaired sensation; progressive loss of motion; mental 
deterioration. 

TEEATMENT. 

See General Treatment (page 306), from which patient 
often derives great benefit. Treatment should be given 
every other day. 

CEREBRAL TUMOR. 

(Tumor of the brain.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Headache; vomiting; optic neuritis; vertigo; mental 
change. More common in males. 
Ko cure in Osteopathy. 

CEREBRAL ABSCESS. 
(Abscess of the brain, usually caused by traumatism.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Fever, and rigor; localized headache; vertigo; vomit- 
ing; optic neuritis. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

INFANTILE HEMIPLEGIA. 

(Acute cerebral paralysis, occuring in children, on one side, 

during first &\e years of age.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Vomiting; convulsions; drowsiness or coma; as oppo- 
site side grows the affected side becomes shortened and 
wasted; sensation unimpaired. 



DISEASES OF THE XERTOUS SYSTEM. 357 

TREATMENT. 

The general health of the child can be greatly improved 
l>y Cxeneral Treatment (page -^UG). 

CEREBRO-SPINAL SCLEROSIS. 

(Chronic degeneration of the brain and cord.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Xystagmns; scanning speech; reflexes exaggerated; 
jerky tremor; may be headache, vertigo, and optic neurisis. 
Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

GLOSSO-LABIO-LARYNGEAL PARALYSIS, OR BULBAR 
PARALYSIS. 

(Chronic degeneration of the nuclei of the medulla.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Loss of power of articulation and deglutition; atrophy 
of the muscles involved; inability to close the lips; food 
enters larynx; reflex action lost; sensation not affected. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

PARALYSIS AGITANS, OR SHAKING PALSY. 
(Paralysis occurring in old age. More common in males.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Muscular tremor, beginning in ^ands and extending to 
arms, then to legs; sensation of increased heat in affected 
parts; no pain; mind unaffected; general weakness and 
wasting. 

TREATMENT. 

The patient can be greatly benefited by thorough Gen- 
eral Treatment (pfMxe .''Ofi). 

Also see Paralysis fpage H28). 



358 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

PARETIC DEMENTIA. 

(Progressive paralysis of the insane.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
General change in character and disposition; habits 
hasty and irregular; loss of coordinating powers for deli- 
cate tasks; speech becomes defective; gait becomes shuf- 
fling; tremor; delusions; paroxysms. 

TREATMENT. 

Give treatment for Insanity (see below). 

INSANITY. 
(A persistent morbid condition of mind due to some derange- 
ment of the brain or nervous system, usually character- 
ized by deficiency or loss of volitional and rational con- 
trol, by excessive activity of the fantasy, and by per- 
^erted action of one or more of the mental faculties.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervical, move the muscles upward and outward, thor- 
oughly and deep, the entire length of the spinal column, being 
very thorough in the cervical and dorsal regions. Treat the 
opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Place the patient on the back; one operator hold- 
ing the shoulders, an assistant the feet, give gentle but very 
strong extension two minutes. 

3. Place one hand under the chin, the other under the 
occipital; give strong extension of the neck one minute, 
being particular not to rotate the head when giving strong 
extension; pull gently, rotating the head as far as possible 
from side to side. 



DISEASED OF THE XERTOUS SYSTEM. 359 

4. Manipulate very thoiouglilT. carefully, but deep, 
all the muscles of the neck. 

In case of other complications, such as paralysis, consti- 
pation, poor circulation, kidney troubles, etc., give such addi- 
tional treatment as conditions indicate. 

The treatment will occupy ten or fiften minutes, and 
should be given each day. 

We ha^e known of a large number of cases of insanity 
having been treated osteopathically. and while none were 
violent, the results were so very beneficial, and such 
speedy cures were effected, we believe that almost all forms 
of insanity would yield readily to this method of treatment, 
which, removing obstruction, and freeing, as it does, the cir- 
culation to the brain and spinal cord, seems the only rational 
method of treatment for this disease. 

EPILEPSY ("FALLING SICKNESS," OR "FITS"). 
(A chronic brain and nerve disease, characterized in its most 
violent form by parox3sms recurrent at uncertain inter- 
vals, attended by difficult, stertorous breathing, convul- 
sions of the limbs, foaming at the mouth, facial distor- 
tion, and loss of consciousness and sensation. In the 
milder form there may be loss of consciousness without 
the spasm, or vice versa.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Mental deterioration: during paroxysm the face is pal- 
lid, then flushed, finally cyanotic, pupil dilated and insensi- 
ble to light; urine may contain albumin. 

TREATMEXT. 
This disease is often caused by partial dislocation of the 
atlas, or some of the other upper cervical vertebrae. In such 



360 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

instances, if the dislocation can be discovered and reduced, 
the patient can be cured. 

We find in our practice that about 25 per cent of the 
cases of epilepsy come under the above head; all others are 

incurable. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon the back; the left hand of 
the operator upon the top of the patient's head, the right 
hand and arm beneath the head and neck, the fingers, two 
upon each side of the fourth dorsal vertebra, pressing the 
muscles upward, toward the head, with the left hand, press- 
ing rather hard upon the top of the head, rotating it from 
side to side, as the fingers of the right hand are worked grad- 
ually upward, moving the muscles very deep until the occipi- 
tal is reached (cut 46). 

2. Place one hand under the chin, the other under the 
occipital ; give thorough extension of the neck, pulling until 
the body moves; also manipulate thoroughly all the muscles 
of the front and sides of the neck. 

o. See y^islocation of the Atlas (see below). 

DISLOCATION OF THE ATLAS. 

The spinous process of the atlas is very small, and not 
always easily discovered; its lateral masses, however, are 
easily distinguished, even upon very fleshy people, if they are 
slightly out of line. If through accident, or otherwise, it is 
partially turned upon its articulation, the transverse process 
can be felt upon one side, a little posterior to its normal 
position, at its articulation with the condyle of the occipital; 
while upon the other it will be discovered too far forward. 

To reduce this dislocation, after having given the fore- 
going treatment : 

Stand behind the patient, who should be seated upon a 
stool; the thumb of the left hand upon the right transverse 




Cut 39.— The Cervical Region. 




Cut 40. — Reducing Dislocation of Atlas. 



DISEASES OF THE XERTOl'S SYSTEM. 365 

process of the atlas (should the right side be thrown back- 
wardl. place the right hand under patient's chin, the pa- 
tient's head resting against operator's breast and shoulder; 
in this position the operator can giye strong extension, rotat- 
ing the head to the left, strongly but gently, and with still 
greater extension rotate slowly to the right, pressing hard 
Ayith tlie thumb upon the transyerse process (cut 40). 

Care must be exercised to giye no unnecessary pain, and 
to moye the atlas but a little each treatment, which should 
be giyen eyery other day until recoyery. 

In case either of the spinous processes of the ceryicals 
are discoyered out of line, the same ti'eatment will apply, 
placing the thumb upon the side of the spinous process, and 
pressing it toward its normal position, as extension and 
rotation are giyen. 

CHOREA, OR ST. VITUS' DANCE. 

(Spasmodic neurosis, with inyoluntary muscular twitching 

and irregular moyements of the limbs.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Occurs most frequently in girls between the ages of flye 
and twenty. Incoordinate muscular moyements, aggrayated 
by excitement; sensation unimpaired; heart regular; tem- 
perature slightly elevated. May be inherited. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper ceryicals, moye the muscles upward and outward the 
entire length of the spinal column, being yery particular in 
all regions where contracted muscles, tenderness to the 
touch, or any irregular temperature is detected. 

2. Place the hands under the chin and occipital, giy- 



366 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ing thorough extension of the neck; also rotate the neck as 
far as posRible from side to side, without giving extension; 
manipulate thoroughly all muscles of the neck. 

It is usually well to apply such parts of General Treat- 
ment (page 800), as symptoms would indicate. 

This disease usually responds very readily to osteopathic 
treatment, which will require fifteen or twenty minutes, and 
should be given every other day until recovery. 

We sometimes find St. Vitus' Dance caused by a slip or 
partial dislocation of some of the vertebrae. Careful exami- 
nation of the spine should always be made, and if any irregu- 
larity is fjound, it must be corrected before we can hope to 
effect a cure. See Spinal Dislocations. 

HYDROCEPHALUS. 

(Collection of water within the skull.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

In congenital form is present at birth. Progressive 
enlargement of the skull; mental weakness; convulsions; 
vomiting; wasting; and eyeballs prominent. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

INTRACRANIAL ANEURISM. 
(Rupture of a blood-vessel in the skull.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Headache; vertigo; convulsions; optic neuritis; and 
palsies. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 



DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 367 

NEURASTHENIA, NERVOUS DEBILITY, OR NERVOUS 
PROSTRATION. 

(Exhaustion of nerve-force.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

In the cerebral form, sensation of weight and fullness in 
the head, with flushes of heat; neck-weariness; aching in the 
back of the head or neck; weariness in the eyeballs after 
reading. In the spinal form, tenderness along the spine; 
aching in the cervical region ; backache and pain in the legs ; 
weariness on slight exertion. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the face; the hands of the 
operator under the chin and occipital bone, give gentle exten- 
sion for one minute, pulling until the body almost moves. 

2. Placing the hands upon the patient's neck just 
below the occipital, move the muscles slightly upward, but 
strongly outward from the spine, the entire length of the 
spinal column, being very particular and thorough in all 
regions where an aching or tired feeling is manifest. 

.3. Beginning at the upper cervicals, with one hand 
upon each side of the spine, as close to the processes as pos- 
sible, press gently downward upon each vertebra a few" sec- 
onds the entire length of the spinal column, being very par- 
ticular over each of the great nerve-centers. 

This treatment has proved very beneficial in all the 
cases of neurasthenia in which it has been applied. 

In case of other complications it is always necessary to 
apply such accessory treatment as the conditions indicate, 
which should be given before the Treatment for Neurasthenia. 



368 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. . 

HYSTERIA. 

(Functional nervous affection, with abnormal sensation, emo- 
tions, or with paroxysms. Peculiar to females, usually 
most frequent at the catamenial jjeriod, and in the 
unmarried.) 

CAUSE. 
Grief; disappointed affections; overspoiling; indolent 

and luxurious habits; errors in diet; nervous debility, and 

womb disease. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Tendency to laughter or tears without apparent cause; 

spinal ten^derness ; intense pain in the head at times ; surface 

of the skin may be cool and pale, or hot and red; deficiency 

of will-power; may be convulsions; eructation of gas and 

copious discharge of pale urine; sensation of ball in the 

throat; palpitation of heart; may become cold and lose 

consciousness. 

TREATMENT. 
This affection is usually easily and quickly cured by 

osteopathic treatment. See Neurasthenia (page 307). 

Change of scene and associations ; general care of bodily 

health, particularly as regards diet. 

Hysteria is often the result of female trouble, in which 

case we must remove the canse before a cure can be expected. 

See Gynecology. 

EXOPHTHALMIC GOITER, GRAVES' OR BASEDOW'S 
DISEASE. 

(A vasomotor affection, characterized by great rapidity of 
heart action; enlargement of the thyroid gland and 
protrusion of the eyeballs.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Thyroid gland gradually enlarges, is painless, soft, and 



DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 369 

may pulsate; gradual protrusion of the eyeball, may be 
inflamed, and to the extent of preventing the closure of the 
lids; pulse small and irregular, and may beat 150 to 175; 
appetite impaired; loss of flesh and strength. 

TKEATMENT. 

1. Place the hand under the chin and occipital, and 
give thorough extension of the neck, using suflicient strength 
to move the body. 

2. Give gentle extension, rotating the head slowly 
but quite strongly from side to side. 

3. Manipulate the muscles in the sides and front of 
the neck very thoroughly, working under and kneading the 
goiter as much as possible. 

4. Place the patient upon a stool; extending the 
right arm around the neck, place the right thumb under the 
left clavicle at about its middle, grasping the patient's left 
arm, with the disengaged hand, at the elbow, the arm flexed; 
piess the arm upward, thus throwing the clavicle upward 
and forward, and permitting the right thumb to slip under it 
at about its center; still pressing upward, move the arm for- 
ward, outward, and backward, at the same instant springing 
upward on the clavicle with the thumb. Treat the opposite 
clavicle in a similar manner (cut 41). 

5. Place the hands on the sides of the patient's neck; 
tip the head backward, and press hard with the fingers. 
which shoul(^ almost meet over the spinous processes of the 
upper cervicals, three or four minutes (cut 35). 

6. Place the hand lightly over the goiter, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) gently two or three minutes. 

If there are any accompanying disorders, such treatment 
should be given as symptoms indicate. 



370 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

Exophthalmic goiter is often benefited by this method 
of treatment, which will occupy about fifteen minutes, and 
should be given every other day. 

LOCAL ASPHYXIA, SYMMETRICAL GANGRENE, OR RAY- 
NAUD'S DISEASE. 

(A vaso-motor and vascular affection of the limbs, character- 
ized by tonic contraction of the coats of the blood- 
vessels, followed by local asphyxia and gangrene.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Similar to those of Frost-bite; fingers on both sides 
become pale, numb, and cold; its onset may be marked by 
the presence of blood in the urine. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease is often benefited and sometimes cured in its 
early stages by a Greneral Treatment (page 300). Treatment 
should be given everv other dav. 



WRITER'S CRAMP. 

(Painful cramping of the fingers while attempting to write. 
Due to long-continued movements in a strained posi- 
tion, involving the muscles of the arm and hand.) 

SY^MPTOMS. 

Act of writing becomes slow and labored; fingers and 
hands ache from weariness; spasm increases in intensity; 
writing finally impossible; tremor rare. 




Cut 41.— Raising the Clavicle. 



—24- 



Cut 42. — Brachial Plexus. 



DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 375 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon a stool ; with the thumb of 
the left hand close to the spine, upon the right side, above 
the first dorsal vertebra, with the right hand draw patient's 
right arm high above the head, pressing upward with the 
thumb as the arm is lowered with a backward motion (cut 
43); move the thumb down to the next lower dorsal; raise 
the arm as before, and repeat until the fifth dorsal is reached. 

2. Place the hand upon the top of the patient's head, 
the left thumb upon the right side of the spine at the seventh 
cervical; press the head downward as far as possible, ro- 
tating it slowly but strongly to the left; rotate and raise 
slowly to its normal position, with the thumb pressing hard, 
moving the muscles outward from the spine; place the thumb 
upon the next ujjper cervical; rotate the head as before, and 
repeat until the first cervical is reached. Treat the opposite 
side of the neck in a similar manner. 

3. Place one hand under the chin, the other under the 
occipital ; give slow but strong extension of the neck. 

The above treatment frees and stimulates the Brachial 
Plexus (cut 42), which controls the arm. 

4. Holding the arm firmly with one hand, with the 
other beginning at the axilla, rotate the flesh very deeply the 
entire length of the arm, endeavoring to move the muscles to 
the bone (cut 44). 

Treatment should be given every other day, and will 
occupy about ten minutes. 



376 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TETANUS, TRISMUS, OR LOCK-JAW. 

(In this class five varieties are noted: (1) Trismus, or Lock- 
jaw, limited to the throat and lower jaw; (2) Tetanus, 
affecting the extensor and flexor muscles of the body 
in general, with iDersistent, painful contractions or 
spasms, either idiopathic or, more frequently, traumatic; 

(3) Emprosthotonos, where the body is flexed forward; 

(4) Opisthotonos, backward; and (5) Pleurothotonos, 
laterally or to one side only. Trismus is the most 
common form.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Stiffness of the jaw, with tonic spasms; stiffness of the 
tongue; muscles of the face, neck, spine, and trunk gradu- 
ally become rigid; grinning countenance; respiration embar- 
rassed; face livid; perspiration. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, manipulate the muscles, moving them up- 
ward and outward thoroughly and very deeply along the 
entire length of the spinal column, being particular to manip- 
ulate and knead the muscles until they become soft and 
flexible. Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. One operator grasping the shoulders, another the 
limbs, give thorough extension of the spine. 

3. Place the hands under the chin and occipital bone; 
an assistant holding the feet, pull slowly and strongly, using 
as much strength as would be deemed safe. 

4. Manipulate all the muscles in the neck, working 
as far as possible up under the jaws; be particular to knead 
the muscles until thev become soft and flexible. 




Cut 43. — Writer's Cramp. 




Cut 44. — Freeing the Circulation. 



DISEASES OF THE XERYOUS SYSTEM. 381 

5. Giving' very gentle extension, rotate the head as 
far as possible from side to side. 

6. Flex the arms and limbs strongly but slowly, giv- 
ing them strong abduction, adduction, rotation, and exten- 
sion, kneading the muscles in a very thorough manner. 

7. Draw the arm strongly above the head, pressing- 
hard with the disengaged hand upon the angle of the second 
rib; lower the arm with a backward motion; move the fingers 
down to the next vertebra; raise the arm as before, and 
repeat until the sixth dorsal is reached. Treat the opposite 
side in a similar manner. 

This treatment will occupy about one hour, and should 
be given twice a day until recovery. 

TETANILLA, OR TETANY. 

(Tetanic spasms of muscles in the arm and leg, affecting the 
fingers and toes.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Headache; vomiting; spinal pain; numbness and ting- 
'ling; burning and itching may precede spasm, which gener- 
ally attacks hands first, then feet; muscles of other parts may 
become involved. 

TEEATMENT. 

See Tetanus (page 376). 

PLUMBISM. 

(Lead poisoning. Peculiar to those who work in metals or 

mines, or from drinking water from lead pipes.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Abdominal colic; constipation; wrist-drop; blue line on 



382 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the gums; impaired nutrition; anemia; cramps in the legs; 
delirium and convulsions; multiple neuritis. 
No cure in Osteopathy, 

DELIRIUM TREMENS. 
(A mental derangement attended by extreme nervous agita- 
tion and hallucinations, caused by the excessive use of 
narcotics or alcoholic liquors.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

General disturbance of functions; fear; tremor and unde- 
cided muscular action; feeble but rapid action of heart; de- 
pression :^11 indicative of the most depressed condition of all 
the vital functions; anorexia; insomnia; irritability of the 
stomach; talkativeness; delusion; may be elevation of tem- 
perature, and albumin in the urine. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

INSOMNIA. 
(Inability to sleep.) 

CAUSE. 

May be due to mental or physical overwork, or strain, 
indigestion, tobacco, drugs, tea, coffee, constipation, or 
excitement. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Remove all the above causes. 

2. Thorough and very careful General Treatment (page 
'>0(i), to equalize the forces of the entire system. 

3. Place the patient on the face; press gently between 
each of the transverse processes close to the spine, the entire 
length of the spinal column. 

4. Hold the vaso-motor (page 253) three or four minutes. 



DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. 383 

5. Exercise an hour just before going to bed. After 
retiring, take several deep breaths very slowly. 

Treatment should be given each day. A speedy recov- 
ery may be expected, provided the patient exercises due cau- 
tion in avoiding the causes which lead up to the condition. 

STAMMERING. 

(A halting, defective utterance; especially the involuntary 
rapid repetition of a sound or syllable, attributable to 
nervousness.) 

TREATMENT. 

This is usually a habit, rather than a disease. 

1. Encourage the patient; instruct him to stop the 
instant he begins to stammer. The patient should be in- 
structed to fill the lungs with air before endeavoring to 
speak, 

2. Instruct the patient to count after the operator, 
being particular to draw a full breath before each articu- 
lation. 

In a very short time the patient will be able to count 
up to one hundred without difficulty. 

3. It is always ad^^-isable to give a thorough General 
Treatment of the Xeck to free the circulation to the head 
(page 393), being particular to manipulate the laryngeal mus- 
cles thoroughly. 

4. Place the finger in the mouth, manipulating thor- 
oughly the muscles under the tongue, and vibrate over the 
spheno-palatine. or Meckel's ganglion, one minute. 

This entire treatment will occupy about one hour, and 
should be given each day, until a cure is effected. 



384 OSTEGFATHY COMPLETE. 

IMPOTEXCY. 

(Partial or complete loss of sexual power). 

CAUSE. 

May be due to excesses, impairmeut of the blood-supply 
or nerve-waye to the parts iuvolved, general debility, or 
syphilitic affection. 

TREATMENT. 

1. In case of general debility, thorough General Treat- 
ment (page 806). 

2. In case of impairment of blood-supply and nerve- 
wave to, the parts involved, place the patient on the face; 
with the thumbs on each side of the spine, beginning at the 
last dorsal, move the muscles upward and outward very 
deep through the lumbar and sacral regions. 

3. Place both hands on the same side of the spine; 
beginning at the first lumbar, move the muscles slightly 
upward and strongly outv\'ard, permitting the muscles to 
slip under the hand, through the lumbar and sacral regions. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

4. With the patient lying in the same position, the 
operator removing his left shoe, places his left foot upon the 
sacrum, the right between the limbs of the patient; grasp 
the patient's ankles, and, while pressing hard with the 
foot upon the sacrum, draw the limbs slowly but strongly 
upward as high as the patient can stand without much pain 
(cut 45). 

The spinal erection center lies in the lumbar region, and 
the motor nerves for the deep artery of the penis arise from 
the first to the third sacral nerves, while the motor nerves 
for the ischio-cavernosus and the deep transverse perineal 
muscles arise from the third to the fourth sacral nerves. 




Cut 45. — Impotency 



DISEASES OF THE yERYOUS SYSTEM. 387 

The spinal ejaculation center lies at the fourth lumbar 
vertebra, and the motor fibers for the bulbo-cavernosus mus- 
cle, which ejects the semen from the bulb of the urethra, 
lie in the third and fourth sacral nerves. 

The above treatment, therefore, stimulates these centers, 
and frees the action of these nerves, permitting them to per 
form their functions. 

5. Place the patient on his side with the limbs flexed; 
dip the finger in vaseline, ijassing it carefully up the rectum; 
manipulate gently but thoroughly the prostate gland, which 
will usually be found enlarged, thus obstructing the escape 
of the semen from the ejaculatory ducts. 

6. It is always advisable to manipulate thoroughly the 
penis and testicles, giving strong extension to these parts. 

Treatment should be given every other day, and rarely 
fails to effect a cure in from four to twelve weeks. 

Impotency caused by excesses and syphilitic affections is 
often benefited, and sometimes cured, bv the above treatment. 



388 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 



Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 



EXPLANATORY. 

In the treatment of diseases of the above named organs 
the osteopath is very successful, benefiting nearly all, and 
curing manj^ chronic diseases that have baffled the skill of 
the medical fraternity. 

In nearly all diseases of the neck or head it is necessary 
to give a thorough General Treatment of the Neck, thereby 
freeing the circulation to and from the diseased parts. 

in some rare instances the atlas will be found slipped or 
partially dislocated, in which case returning it to its normal 
position will usually cure the disease. 

Diseases of the head are often aggravated by female 
troubles, diseases of the alimentary canal and other organs, 
which must be cured before we can hope to attain the desired 
end. 

Granulated eyelids, dripping eyes, inflammation of the 
eyes, catarrh, polypus of the nose, catarrhal deafness and 
roaring in the head, enlarged tonsils, mumps, erysipelas of 
the face, and many other diseases of the head, are caused 
by a contracted condition of the muscles of the neck, 
obstructing the flow of the venous blood on its return journey 
to the heart. The circulation being thus interrupted, disease 
at the weakest point is the result. To remove the cause bv 




Cut 46.— Treatment of the Neck. 



—25- 




Cut 47.— Treatment of the Neck. 



THE EYE, EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT. 393 

a General Treatment of the Neck is but the work of a mo- 
ment, and never fails to effect a cure. 

GENERAL TREATMENT OF THE NECK. 

1. Place the patient on the back; with one hand under 
the chin and the other under the back of the head, pull 
gently, rotating the head in all directions, slowly but 
strongly, endeavoring to stretch all muscles of the neck 
(see cut 8). 

2. Pull slowly on the head until the body moves. 

o. Place the left hand on the top of patient's head, 
the right hand and arm beneath the head and neck, two fin- 
gers upon each side of the fourth dorsal vertebra, the ends 
of the fingers pressing hard, moving the muscles upward, at 
the same time press rather hard with the left hand, rotating 
the head from side to side, the fingers of the right hand 
working gradually upward, until the occipital is reached 
(cut 46). 

4. Standing at patient's head, place the hands upon 
the sides of the neck, the fingers just back of the transverse 
processes of the upper cervicals ; give gentle extension, rotat- 
ing the head to the right, with the left hand moving the 
muscles forward and over the transverse processes upon the 
left side; rotate the head in the opposite direction, with the 
right hand moving the muscles forward and over the trans- 
verse processes upon the right side; move the hands down- 
ward to the next lower cervicals ; rotate the head as before^ 
and repeat until the last cervical is reached (cut 47). 

5. Manipulate the muscles thoroughly and deep in 
the front of the neck; place the hand under the chin, drawing 
the head backward, thus giving these muscles extension; 
work as deeply as possible under the inferior maxillary. 



394 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

Tlie Rye. 



TRACHOMA, OR GRANULAR LIDS (GRANULATED 
EYELIDS). 
(A form of conjunctivitis, characterized by hard pustules or 
granular excrescences, round and gvaj, on the inner 
surface of the eyelids, with inflammation of the 
membrane.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
In ,this affection the conjunctival mucous membrane 
of the eye is raised into little projections, presenting a rough, 
irregular appearance. It is a consequence of long-continued 
or maltreated inflammation, and if not cured, it may in time 
occasion opacities of the cornea by the irritation it causes, 
followed by blindness. 

TREATMENT. 

1. General Treatment of the Neck (page .393). 

2. Standing at the head of the table, with the index 
finger work gently, but as deeply as possible, moving the 
muscles and pressing under the edge of the bone entirely 
around the eye (cut 48); this frees the circulation and gives 
immediate relief. 

.3. Pinch the eyelids gently wherever granules are 
formed, thus starting a natural circulation. 

We have never known this method to fail, even in the 
worst cases. One old gentleman at Lewistown, Missouri, 
was cured by us in this manner, after suffering fifty years, 
in two months' time. The usual time required for an ordinary 
case is from four to twelve weeks. Treatment should be 
given every other day. 




Cut 48.— Inflammation of the Eye. 



THE EYE. 397 

INFLAMMATION OF THE EYES. 

(A morbid state, characterized in its simplest form by heat, 
redness, and pain in the eyes.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Often comes on with a sensation of sand in the eyes. 
In some instances this complaint proceeds no farther, but at 
other times it is followed by heat, redness, and prictling, 
with darting pains. 

CAUSE. 

The cause is attributed by the medical profession to a 
stoppage of function in the microscopic elements of the 
involved tissues, or to changes in the blood-vessels and 
blood, and exudation of liquor sanguinis, with permeation 
of white blood-corpuscles, without rupture of the vessels, 
into the contiguous parts; or to altered nutrition of the 
tissues. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. General Treatment of the Xeck (page .393). 

2. With the index finger work gently but deeply un~ 
der the edge of the bones surrounding the eye, beginning 
deeply in the corner of the eye, and being particular to press 
against the bone, and not the eyeball (cut 48). Raise the 
finger entirely ofE the flesh as it is moved forward; in this 
manner the eye can be treated very thoroughly and deeply 
without giving pain, while if the operator endeavors to slide 
his finger over the flesh without removing it from the eye, 
the operation is painful, and the results not so pronounced. 

It is always well to manipulate all the muscles in the 
immediate vicinity of the eye, thus freeing the circulation. 

3. Place two flngers lightly over the eye and vibrate. 



398 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

being careful not to move the lid, which should be kept 
steady on the eyeball, that the vibration may pass through. 
See Vibration (pages 36 and 67). The vibration should be 
felt very deeply. 

This treatment will require about ten or fifteen minutes, 
and should be given each day until recovery. 

We have cured many cases of inflammation of the eyes 
in which the patient was in such a condition that it was 
necessary for him to be led to our office, in a very few days, 
by this method of treatment. 

Many cases, however, are more stubborn, requiring from 
six to eight weeks, and, in chronic cases, often three months' 
treatment is required to effect a cure. 

A great many cases of inflammation of the eyes, and 
other diseases of the head, are due to a slip or partial dislo- 
cation of the atlas, which can be readily discovered by mak- 
ing a careful examination, and must be reduced before a cure 
can be e\-])ected. See Dislocation of the Atlas (page 360). 

CATAERHAL CONJUNCTIVITIS. 

(Inflammation of the conjunctiva.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Conjunctiva red; eyelids stuck together on awakening, 
and feel heavy; itching and burning sensation. 

TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eyes (page 397). 

PHLYCTENULAR CONJUNCTIVITIS. 

(Inflammation of the conjunctiva, with small blisters under 

the epithelium, containing lymph.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eyes (page 397). 



THE EYE. 399 

DIFFUSE PARENCHYMATOUS KERATITIS. 
(Inflammation of the substance of the cornea.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eves (page 397). 

ACUTE PHLYCTENULAR KERATITIS. 

(Inflammation of the cornea characterized by small vesicles 
on its surface.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eves (page 397). 

IRITIS. 

(Inflammation of the iris.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eves (page 397). 

SCLERITIS. 

(Inflammation of the sclera.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eyes (page 397). 

EPISCLERITIS. 

(Inflammation, with infiltration, and sero-fibrinous exudation 
in the outer layer of the sclerotic and upper layer of the 
conjunctiva — violet in color, hard and sensitive.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Trachoma (p)age 394). 



400 ' OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CILIARY BLEPHARITIS. 

(Inflammation of the edges of the eyelids — which are hyper- 
emic and swollen; skin between the cilia covered with 
little scales; small ulcers in hair-follicles and sebaceous 
glands; inflammation of the Meibomian glands.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Trachoma fpage 394). 

DACRYOCYSTITIS. 

(Inflammation of the lachrymal sac.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eyes (page 397). 

TENONITIS. 

(Inflammation of Tenon's Capsule.) 
TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eyes (page 397). 

PTERYGIUM. 

(Chronic thickening of the conjunctiva at the inner canthus, 
extending out over the eyeball. A film on the eye. Pop- 
ularly called a web.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Inflammation of the Eyes (page 397). 

2. Grasp the eyelid between the thumb and finger, and 
pinch gently and deep enough to reach the pterygium, which 
should be treated in this manner quite thoroughly, great care 
being exercised not to cause the patient unnecessary pain. 
This treatment starts the -circulation and causes the pteryg- 
ium to be taken up by absorption. 

Treatment should be given every other day. 

A cure may be expected in from four to twelve weeks. 



THE EYE. 401 

LEUCOMA, OR ALBUGO. 

(Dense opacity of the cornea; white spot in the eye.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eye (page 897), being particular 
to free the circulation thoroughly, immediately around and 
through the eye, by careful manipulation; also be particular 
to vibrate thoroughly. 

PANNUS. 
(Vascularization and opacity of the cornea.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eye (page ?>97), placing particu- 
lar stress on the vibration and manipulation to free the 
circulation around and through the eye. 

CATARACT. 

(An affection of the sight, in which the vision is either par- 
tially or wholly prevented, by a permeation of opaque 
matter in the crystalline lens of the eye. Is of two 
kinds, hard and soft. Hard is most common in old 
people. Soft is most frequently found in children, espe- 
cially among those who have been born with this condi- 
tion, when it is called Congenital Cataract, but may 
occur at any age. When it is the result of a wound of the 
lens, it is called Traumatic Cataract. In children it pre- 
sents a bluish-white appearance like milk and water in 
the pupil, and is easily recognizable; the color is much 
darker and less distinct in aged persons, and more diffi- 
cult to see, but the opacity of the lens can be detected 
by careful examination.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Inflammation of the Eyes (page 397). 



402 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

In treating this disease the osteopath is unusually suc- 
cessful, curing nearly all cases that are taken in any reason- 
able time. 

Treatment should be given every other day, until a cure 
is effected, which will require from four weeks to six months. 

Cataracts have been removed by this treatment, after 
the patient had become almost entirely blind. 

STRABISMUS, OR CROSSED EYES. 
(A condition in which the visual axes of the eyes are crossed, 
transfixing the object.) 
This affection is not successfully treated by osteopaths. 

MYOPIA, MYOPY, OR NEAR-SIGHTEDNESS (ALSO SHORT- 
SIGHTEDNESS; PURBLINDNESS). 

(Defect in vision so that objects can be clearly seen only 
when very close to the eye, generally produced by too 
much convexitj^ of the cornea or crystalline lens, causing 
the focus of parallel rays to be in front of the retina 
instead of on the cornea.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. See InHammation of the Eye (page 397), omitting 
vibration. 

2. With the eye closed, place the finger immediatetly 
over the cornea, pressing gently, gradually increasing the 
strength used, for one minute. 

Treatment should be given every other day. 
Many cases have been benefited by this method. 

DRIPPING EYES. 
Dripping eyes are usually accompanied with a catarrhal 
difflculty in the lachrymal duct, which conveys all watery 
substances from the eye to the interior of the nose. Its 



THE EYE. 403 

obstruction causes the overflow at the eye; we must there- 
fore cure the catarrh, and the eyes will take care of 
themselves. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Give the General Treatment for the Xech (page 393). 

2. Free all the muscles around the eyes as in Inflam- 
ma,tion of the Eyes (cut 48). 

3. Beginning deep in the corner of the eye, with the 
thumb on one side of the nose, the index finger on the other, 
move the flesh and muscles upward and downward its entij'e 
length. 

This treatment is almost infallible, cases of twenty 
years' standing having been cured by us in one month's time. 
Treatment should be given every other day. 



The B.ar. 



ACUTE CATARRHAL OTITIS MEDIA, OR EARACHE. 

(Catarrhal inflammation of the middle ear. Usually due to 
extension of catarrhal inflammation of the naso-pharynx 
to the tympanic cavity by way of the Eustachian tube.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Intense aching pain; membrana tympani red. 

TREATMEXT. 

1. Thorongh General Treatment of the Xeck (page 393). 

2. Manipulate very thoroughly and deep all the mus- 
cles around the ear. 



404 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

3. With the index finger work as deeply into the ear 
as possible without giving pain, endeavoring to move the 
muscles in every possible direction. 

4. Grasp the inferior portion of the lobule between the 
thumb and finger, and pull gently but quite strongly, slightly 
downward and backward, thus stretching the muscles and 
freeing the circulation very deeply. 

5. Place the fingers lightly over the Gasserian gan- 
glion (cut 49), and vibrate (pages 36 and 67) gently one 
minute. 

6. Patient should inhale deeply, and, while holding 
the nose and mouth, endeavor to force the air through the 
ears, thus springing the drums and starting the circulation. 

It is also advisable in stubborn cases to make a small 
paper tube; place one end in the patient's ear, the other in 
the mouth of the operator, and blow strongly a few seconds. 

In almost all diseases of the ear the osteopath is very 
successful, curing many cases instantly and many others in a 
few treatments. The usual time required in chronic cases, 
however, is from one to three months. These results are 
reached almost entirely through the circulation, and conse- 
quently nearly all diseases of the ear are treated by the 
osteopath in a similar manner. 

Occasionally, in diseases of the ear, a slight slip or dislo- 
cation of the atlas is found, in which case it is necessary to 
reduce the dislocation, when an immediate change for the 
better may be expected. See Dislocation of the Atlas 
(page 360). 

Treatment in acute cases in all diseases of the ear should 
be given each day and will occupy about fifteen or twenty 
minutes. Chronic cases will require the same length of 
time, and should be treated everv other dav. 



TEE EAR. 405 

CHRONIC CATARRHAL OTITIS MEDIA. 

(May follow an acute attack.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Ringing in the ears; deafness; tendency to breathe 
through the mouth, if patient is a child. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media (page 403). 

AURAL VERTIGO, OR MENIERE'S DISEASE. 

(Feeling of rotary movements, referred to the patient or 
to surrounding objects, with loss of equilibrium, but 
conscious.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Ringing in ears; pallor; nausea; clammy sweat; vom- 
iting; jerking of eyeballs; paroxysms sometimes throwing 
the patient to the ground. 

TREATMENT. 

1. General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 

2. Place the patient upon a stool; the operator plac- 
ing one knee between the scapulae, about the third dor- 
sal, raise the arms slowly but strongly above the' head, press- 
ing hard with the knee as the arms are lowered with a back- 
ward motion (cut 5). 

This disease is often occasioned by a slight slip or dislo- 
cation of the atlas. See Dislocation of the Atlas (page 360). 

DEAFNESS. 
(A lack or deficiency in the sense of hearing; a whole or par- 
tial inability to distinguish sound.) 

CAUSE. 
May be due to pressure of a tumor, inflammatory exu- 
dation at the base of the brain, disease of the mastoid process 

—26— 



406 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

of the temporal bone, or disease of the auditory nucleus or 
peripheral nerves. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media (page 403). 

CATARRHAL DEAFNESS AND ROARING IN THE HEAD. 

TREATMENT. 
Catarrhal deafness can be always benefited, and usually 
cured, by the Catarrhal (Coryza) Treatment (page 407), after 
which the patient should inhale deeply, and, while holding 
the nose and mouth, endeavor to force the air through the 
drums of the ears, thus springing the drums and starting 
the circulation. 

OTOMYCES, OR OTOMYCOSIS. 

(Fungous growth in the ear.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media (page 403). 

OTONCUS. 

(An aural tumor.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media (page 403). 

OTOPYOSIS. 

(Discharge of pus from the ear.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media (page 403). 

OTORRHAGIA. 

(Discharge of blood from the ear.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Catarrhal Otitis Media (page 403). 



THE NOSE. 407 



The Mose, 



CORYZA, ACUTE RHINITIS, ACUTE NASAL CATARRH, OR 
COLD IN THE HEAD. 

(Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose and 
connecting sinuses.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

This disease sometimes prevails epidemically, and it is 
to this form medical writers apply the term "influenza/' while 
cases that occur incidentally are called catarrh, or cold. 
When it prevails epidemically, it undouhtedlj^ depends upon 
the state of the atmosphere, though in some cases it has been 
attributed to contagion. 

In general, it comes on with a dull pain or sense of weight 
in the forehead, sometimes preceded by a slight chill, redness 
of the eyes, and fullness and heat in the nostrils, which is 
soon followed by a thin acrid fluid from the, nose, together 
with soreness in the windpipe, hoarseness, frequent sneezing, 
dry cough, loss of appetite, and general lassitude. Toward 
evening the pulse becomes considerably quickened and a 
slight fever arises. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 

2. Beginning deep in the corner of the eyes, move the 
muscles upward and downward, with as hard a pressure as 
patient can stand, the entire length of the nose. 

It is also well to manipulate thoroughly the muscles 
around, over, and under the eyes. 

3. Beginning at the nose, follow the superior max- 
illary, manipulating very deeply its entire length. 



408 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

4. Place the finger-tips over the Gasserian ganglion 
(cut 49), and vibrate (pages 36 and 67) one minute; also 
vibrate an equal length of time over the infra-orbital 
foramen. 

Catarrh in its various forms is often caused by a slip or 
partial dislocation of the atlas. In such instances to reduce 
the dislocation almost invariably cures the disease. See 
Dislocation of the Atlas (page 360). 

5. Place one hand on the back of the head, the other on 
the forehead, and press very hard, moving the muscles of the 
forehead in all directions, especially those immediately over 
the eye. 

This treatment, in acute cases, should be given each day, 
and will occupy about fifteen or twenty minutes; in chronic 
cases every other day is sufficient. Immediate relief may 
usually be expected, and a cure in from one to three months. 

CHRONIC HYPERTROPHIC RHINITIS. 

(Hypertrophy of the turbinated bones. May follow acute 
attacks of coryza.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Hoarseness; fullness in nose; nasal sounds; snoring; 
discharges of muco-pus in the pharynx; hearing may be im- 
paired, also smell and taste ; often accompanied by irritating 
cough. 

TREATMENT. 

While this disease can be greatly benefited by Coryza 
Treatment (page 407), we cannot hope to cure the hypertro- 
phy of the turbinated bones. 



Cut 49. — Gasserian Ganglion. 



TEE yoUE. 411 

DIPHTHERITIC RHINITIS. 

(May accompany acute form.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

False membrane in nose ; discharges acrid ; excoriation 
of upper lip. 

TKEATMENT. 

See Coryza (page 407). 

CHRONIC POST-NASAL RHINITIS. 
(Extension of catarrh into pharynx.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Tingling and sense of soreness at root of nose; pain 
in soft palate and posterior nares; frontal headache; flow of 
thick secretion into pharynx; impaired taste, smell, and 
hearing. 

TREATMENT. 

See Coryza (page 407). 

RHINITIS SYCCA, OR DRY CATARRH. 

(Chronic form of nasal catarrh, with dryness of the mucous 

membrane.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Tingling and dryness in the nostrils; faint musty odor; 
no discharge. 

TREATMENT. 

See Coryza (page 407). 



412 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ATROPHIC RHINITIS^ OR OZENA. 

(A chronic form of nasal catarrh, with atrophy of the mucous 
membrane and ulceration of the nasal cavities.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Frontal headache; exceedingly fetid discharge; hawk- 
ing and spitting of brownish-green crusts, often blood-tinged. 

TEEATMENT. 
Can usually be benefited by Coryza Treatment (page 
407), but cannot be cured if of a syphilitic nature. 

-: RHINOLITH, OR NASAL CALCULUS. 
(Stone in the nose.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
May be fixed or movable, gray or greenish-brown in 
color, hard and rough; sometimes produces pain and reflex 
neuroses. 

TREATMENT. 
This disease can be greatly benefited by the Coryza 
.Treatment (page 407 but an operation may be necessary to 
remove the stone. 

NASAL POLYPI (POLYPUS OF THE NOSE). 
(Pedunculated tumor in the nose.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Snoring and oral breathing; aggravated by damp 
weather; sneezing; and epistaxis. 

TREATMENT. 

Sec ('oryza (page 407), 



THE XOSE. 413 

NASAL TUMORS. 
(May be Fibroma, Sarcoma, Osteoma, Enchondroma, or 

Carcinoma.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Tumor painful and bleeds easily, causing fetid dis- 
charges; cervical glands swollen; stenosis and deformity are 
common, also epistaxis. 

TREATMENT. 
Same as Coryza Treatment (page 407). 

NASAL ULCERS. 
(May be tuberculous or syphilitic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Stench of breath; stenosis; loss of smell; insomnia; 
emaciation. If tuberculous, bleeds easily 
Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

IDIOPATHIC RHINORRHEA. 

(Spontaneous mucous discharge from the nose. Probably 
due to functional derangement of the fifth cervical nerve.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Discharge of yellowish water, which may cease as sud- 
denly as it develops. 

TREATMENT. 
See Coryza (page 407). 

ANTRUM ABSCESS. 
(Abscess of the Antrum of Highmore.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Characteristic odor; putrid taste; nausea; anorexia; 
pain at root of nose; discharge of pus on leaning head for- 
ward; usually bad tooth in upper jaw. 



414 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

See Coryza (page 407). 

EPISTAXIS, OE NOSE-BLEED. 

(Hemorrhage of the nose.) 

CAUSE. 
May be caused by irritation, traumatism, or be due to 
constitutional conditions. 

SYMPTOMS. 
May be none previous to its approach ; may be fullness 
about head; headache; noise in ears; and vertigo. 

TREATMENT. 
The patient, in a sitting posture, should raise his arms as 
far as possible, at the same time placing one thumb upon 
each side of the nose, pressing quite strongly; the operator, 
standing in front, places the hands upon the sides of patient's 
neck, the fingers meeting over the three upper cervicals; tip 
the head strongly backward, pressing hard with the fingers 
at the same instant, and hold in this position until the hemor- 
rhage ceases. 



TtiG Ttiroat. 

ACUTE LARYNGITIS, OR LARYNGEAL CATARRH. 
(Inflammation of the larynx, usually due to exposure or cold.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Cough; hoarseness; fullness and dryness in the lar- 
ynx; dyspena at times; painful deglutition; and mucous 
expectoration. 



TEE THROAT. 415 

TREATMENT. 

1. See General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 

2. Place the hand lightly upon the larynx, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) gently two minutes, 

3. Place the fingers of the left hand upon the angle 
of the second rib on the right side ; draw patient's arm slowly 
above the head as patient inhales, pressing hard upon the 
angle of the rib as the arm is lowered with a backward mo- 
tion; treat each rib in this manner until the lower border of 
the scapula is reached. Treat the opposite side in a similar 
manner. 

Treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and should 
be given each day until recovery. 

Treatment must be given in a gentle, careful manner. 
Patient should feel decidedly better after the first treatment. 

DIPHTHERITIC LARYNGITIS. 

(Acute laryngitis with accumulation of false membrane in 

the fauces and nares.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Similar to membranous croup; cervical glands enlarged; 
little or no fever; albuminuria. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 

2. Place the hand on the larynx, and vibrate (pages 
36 and 67) gently two minutes. 

3. Place the finger in patient's mouth, and manipulate 
carefully, but deep, the muscles in the immediate region of 
the fauces and nares. 

Treatment should be given each day, and immediate im- 
provement can be expected. 



416 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

CHRONIC LARYNGITIS. 
(May result from repeated attacks of acute form. More com- 
mon after middle life, and in males.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Dryness and tickling in throat; hoarseness; irritable 
cough; thickening of laryngeal structure, covered by a thick 
secretion. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. See xlcute Laryngitis (page 415). 

2. Vibrate (pages 36 and 67) two minutes, with the 
hand pressed lightly over the bronchi. 

In chronic cases this treatment usually gives immediate 
relief, but requires about two or three months to effect a 
cure. Treatment every other day. 

LARYNGEAL EDEMA. 
(Dropsy of the larynx. May accompany acute or chronic 
laryngitis, Bright's disease, erysipelas, diphtheria, and 
may be acute or chronic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Voice husky and suppressed; intense dyspnea and 
cough; symptoms of obstruction; respiration hurried and 
spasmodic; pulse small, rapid, and irregular; eyes prom- 
inent; face flushed and anxious. 

TREATMENT. 

1. General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 

2. Place the patient on the side ; beginning at the upper 
cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward the entire 
length of the spine, being very thorough in the lumbar 
region. 



THE THROAT. 417 

3. Flex the limbs strongly against the abdomen, giv- 
ing strong abduction of the knee as they are extended with a 
light jerk. 

4. Vibrate (pages 36 and 67) one minute each of the 
following organs: lungs, stomach, liver, and kidneys. 

5. Place the left hand beneath the patient's shoul- 
ders, the fingers upon the angle of the second rib on the right 
side; draw the right arm strongly but slowly above the head 
as the patient inhales, pressing hard upon the rib as the arm 
is lowered with a backward motion; treat each rib in a 
similar manner until the lower border of the scapula is 
reached. Eepeat the operation on the opposite side. 

Treatment should be given each day until recovery. 

TUBERCULOUS LARYNGITIS. 

(May be acute or chronic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Painful deglutition; dysphonia; pain in respiration; at 
times thickening of the epiglottis; ulceration; tubercle 
bacilli may be detected in the secretions. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

SUBMUCOUS LARYNGITIS. 

(Inflammation extending to the submucous cellular tissue of 

the larynx. May be acute or chronic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Same as laryngitis, vnth stenosis. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Acute Laryngitis (page 415). 

2. See Treatment to Equalize the Circulation (page 
114). 



418 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

PHLEGMONOUS LARYNGITIS, OR PERICHONDRITIS. 

(Suppurative inflammation of the cartilages of the larynx.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Cough and hoarseness; pain increased by moving the 
larynx, as in speaking or swallowing; discharge of pus; 
necrosed cartilage; if arytenoid cartilage is involved, pain 
extends towards the ears; if cricoid, pain on swallowing 
solid food, and dyspnea; if thyroid, abscess may be seen in 
the larynx. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 

2. Thorough vibration (pages 36 and 67) of the lar- 
ynx two minutes. 

3. Place the patient on a stool; with the knee of the 
operator between the scapulae about the third dorsal, draw 
the patient's arms slowly and strongly above the head as the 
lungs ar6 filled to their fullest capacity; lower the arms with 
a backward motion, pressing hard at the same instant with 
the knee. 

Treatment should be given each day. 

LARYNGISMUS STRIDULUS, OR LARYNGOSPASM. 

(Neurosis of the larynx, with spasmodic contraction of the 
glottis; usually in poorly nourished children.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Ringing croupy cough; dyspnea; face at first pallid, 
becoming livid; eyes stare; head drawn backward; spine 
arched; cold perspiration on forehead; convulsions may 
occur. 



THE THROAT, 419 

TREATMENT. 

1. General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 

2. Thorough General Treatment (page 306). 

PSEUDO-MEMBRANOUS LARYNGITIS, OR MEMBRANOUS 

CROUP. 

(Inflammation of the larynx, with formation of false 
membrane.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Fretfulness, feverishness, cold in the head, and slight 
hoarseness, increasing towards evening and in the early 
night. Sometimes, however, without a single warning 
symptom, the child startles us in the night with a hoarse, 
ringing cough, which cannot be so described as to be recog- 
nized, but which no one who has ever heard it can fail to know 
again. There is a sense of suffocation, a hurried, hoarse, 
and hissing breathing, as if the air were drawn into the 
lungs and expelled through too small an opening in some 
instrument, which is the fact, for such an instrument is the 
accumulated phlegm in the larynx. When there is much 
fever and inflammation, the tendency to the formation of 
false membrane is very slight; whereas, in cases that seem 
mild at the beginning the disease often passes to the mem- 
branous stage unsuspected. 

Peculiar ringing cough, becoming muffled; great diffi- 
culty in breathing; suffocating paroxysms; protrusion of 
the eyeballs; extreme restlessness and agitation; nostrils 
dilated; flushed cheeks; grasping at support; clutching. at 
neck; flakes of membrane; casts of trachea, which may be 
expectorated; elevation of temperature. 

TREATMENT. 

1, Thorough General Treatment of the Neck (page 
393). 



420 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

2. Place the finger in the mouth, and gently manipu- 
late the false membrane as thoroughly as possible. 

3. Draw the arms strongly above the head, pressing 
upon the second dorsal vertebra as they are lowered with a 
backward motion. 

4. Place the hand upon the neck and bronchi, and 
vibrate (pages 36 and 67) gently two minutes. 

This treatment is exceedingly successful in all cases of 
membranous croup, relaxing, as it does, the muscles, free- 
ing the circulation, and causing the false membrane to be 
ejected. 

SPASMODIC CROUP, OR CATARRHAL CROUP. 

(Catarrhal laryngitis, with spasms of the larynx.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Hoarsness and cough in the evening, cough becoming 
ringing and metallic toward midnight, with paroxysms of 
suffocation; may occur three or four nights in succession. 

TREATMENT. 

See Membranous Croup (page 419), omitting No. 2. 

LARYNGEAL TUMOR. 
(May be malignant or benign.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Dysphonia or aphonia; dyspnea; may be irritating 
cough; and cachexia. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See General Treatment of the Neck (page 393), 
being very thorough in the region of the tumor. 

2. Place the hand over tumor, and vibrate (pages 36 
and 67) gently two minutes. 



THE THROAT. 421 

3. Seat the patient upon a stool; the operator places 
his knee between the scapulae at about the second or third 
dorsal; draw the arms strongly above the head as the patient' 
inhales, pressing hard with the knee as the arms are lowered 
with a backward motion. 

Treatment should be given each day. 

This disease is often benefited by the above treatment 

LARYNGEAL SYPHILIS. 

(Syphilitic affection of the larynx.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Hoarseness caused by catarrh or ulcerations; artic- 
ulation husky; cough; difficult deglutition; whitish-gray 
mucous patches; round prominences on either side of the 
glottis; deep circular ulcers overlaid with whitish-yellow 
deposits; no pain. 

TREATMENT. 

See Laryngeal Tumor (page 420), giving thorough vibra- 
tion (pages 36 and 67) over larynx and trachea. 

This disease is often benefited by the above treatment. 

ACUTE PHARYNGITIS, OR SORE THROAT. 
(Inflammation of the pharynx. Usually follows cold or 

exposure.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Painful deglutition; sense of dryness and constant 
desire to hawk and cough; may involve the tonsils; may be 
slight deafness; stiffness of the neck and enlargementof the 
cervical glands; chilliness and fever; mucous membrane 
congested, dry, and glistening; uvula may be swollen. 



422 OSTEOPATHY COMPIETE. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Laryngeal (page 415). 

CHRONIC PHARYNGITIS. 

(Follows acute attacks, and may be accompanied by nasal 

catarrh.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Relaxation of the mucous membrane, with dilatation of 
the veins; membrane, dry, glistening, and covered with a 
thick secretion. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Laryngitis (page 415). 

Treatment should be given every other day. Immediate 
benefit may be expected, and a continuation of the treatment 
will usually effect a cure. 

GANGRENOUS PHARYNGITIS, OR PUTRID SORE THROAT. 

(Mortification of the pharyngeal tissues. May follow ordi- 
nary pharyngitis.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Mucous membrane of the tonsils inflamed, also walls of 
the pharynx, soon becoming covered with gangrenous 
patches; may extend to the esophagus, larynx and nares; 
may be erosion of blood-vessels, causing fatal hemorrhage. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease, if taken in its early stages, is very easily 
cured by osteopathic treatment. 

See General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 
Treatment should be given each day. 



THE THROAT. 423 

RETRO-PHARYNGEAL ABSCESS. 
(Suppuration in the retro-pharyngeal tissues. More com- 
mon in children.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Enlargement of cervical glands; stiffness of the neck; 
inability to swallow; high fever; noisy breathing; suffocat- 
ing paroxysms; little or no cough; head often drawn back, 

TREATMENT. 

1. General Treatment of the Xeck (page 393). 

2. Vibrate (pages 36 and 67) one minute over abscess. 

3. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward the 
entire length of the spinal column, gently but deep. Treat 
the opposite side in a similar manner. 

4. Place the left hand under the right shoulder, the 
fingers upon the angle of the second rib ; draw the right arm 
slowly but strongly above the head as the patient inhales, 
and lower the arm with a backward motion, pressing hard 
upon the angle of the rib. Treat the third, fourth, jjand fifth 
rib in a similar manner. Repeat the operation upon the 
opposite side. 

5. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, finger- 
tips almost meeting over the spines of the upper cervicals; tip 
the head beackward, and press hard with the fingers three or 
four minutes (see vaso-motor, page 253). 

Treatment should be given each day. 

TRACHITIS. 

(Inflammation of the trachea. May come from larynx or 

bronchi by extension.) 

TREATMENT. 

Genera] Treatment of the Neck, (page 393). 

—27— 



424 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TRACHELAGRA. 

(Gout in the neck.) 

TREATMENT. 

General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 

TRACHELISMUS. 

(Spasms of the cervical muscles.) 

TREATMENT. 

General Treatment of the Neck (page 893). 

TRACHEAL STENOSIS. 

(Contraction of the trachea. May be due to pressure caused 

by enlargement of glands.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Peculiar whistling, wheezing sound; voice weak and 
muffled; difficult breathing; inspiration obstructed; expira- 
tion easy. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 

2. Thorough vibration (pages 36 and 67) of the trachea. 

ACUTE ESOPHAGITIS. 

(Inflammation of the esophagus, due to traumatism.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Raw, burning pain, aggravated by speaking; expecto- 
ration of a frothy, glairy mucus, with blood and shreds of 
membrane. 

TREATMENT. 
1. Place the patient on the back; manipulate care- 
fully the muscles in the region of the traumatism. It is also 



THE THROAT. 425 

well to rtianipahiT'::' ail the muscles in tlie front and sides of 
the neck. 

2. Gentle vibration ij)ages 36 and GTi of the esophagus. 

CHRONIC ESOPHAGITIS. 
(Mar follow an acute attack.j 

SYMPTOMS. 

Painful deglutition; liquids readily swallowed. but solids 
with great difficulty; expectoration of a viscid mucus. 

TREATMEyT. 

See Acute Esopjhagitis page 424i. 

Patient always derives benefit from this treatment: a 
cure can hardly be expected. 

ESOPHAGEAL ABSCESS. 
(May develop from acute esophagitis.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Development slow; pain increased on movement of the 
neck: rigors and fever. 

TREATMEXT. 

1. Manipulate very gently and carefully the rnus'^les 
of the neck, being very particular to give no unnecessary 
pain. 

2. Give gentle extension and rotation of the neck. 

3. Place the hand over the abscess, and vibrate (pages 
36 and GTi gentlv one minute. 



426 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

ESOPHAGEAL STRICTURE. 
(Contraction of the esophagus, due to the healing of an ulcer.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Difficult deglutition; impaired nutrition; anemia. 
Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

ESOPHAGEAL DILATATION. 

(Expansion of the esophagus.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Regurgitation of food, which is either alkaline or neu- 
tral; sense of distension, with heat and burning; fetid 
breath. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

FOLLICULAR TONSILLITIS. 

(Inflammation of the lining membrane of the lacunae, or 
ducts of the tonsils.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Frontal headache; severe pain in back and limbs; pain 
in throat, and difficult deglutition; chilly sensation and high 
temperature; tonsils swollen and throat dry and burning; 
yellowish-white exudation on the crypts; voice becomes 
nasal; pulse rapid and tongue coated. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Thorough General Treatment of the Neck (page 393), 
being particular to manipulate the tonsils gently but 
thoroughly. 

2. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward the 



TEE THROAT. 427 

entire length of the spinal column gently, but very deep. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

3. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, the 
finger-tips almost meeting over the upper cervicals; tip the 
head backward, pressing gently for three or four minutes 
upon the vaso motor (page 233). 

Treatment should be given each day. 

PARENCHYMATOUS TONSILLITIS, AMYGDALITIS, OR 
QUINSY. 

(Inflammation of the substance of the tonsils. May be 
primary or secondary.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Usually only one tonsil affected, the other may follow ; 
tonsils swollen; voice nasal; difficult deglutition; severe 
pain, which may extend to the ear; tenderness beneath the 
angle of the jaw on pressure; chill; high fever; increased 
secretion of saliva. 

TREATMENT. 

See Follicular Tonsillitis (page 426). 

CHRONIC TONSILLITIS, OR HERPETIC SORE THROAT. 

(May be due to repeated attacks of acute form.) 

SY3IPT0MS. 
Tonsils enlarged and irregular in shape; may be snor- 
ing and defective hearing. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Thorough General Treatment of the Neck (page 
393), kneading and manipulating the enlarged tonsil in a 
very thorough manner. 

2. Place the fingers upon the enlarged tonsil, and give 
thorough vibration (pages 36 and 67) two minutes. 



428 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

HERPETIC TONSILLITIS, OR HERPETIC SORE THROAT. 

(Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the tonsils, palate, 
uvula, and pharynx, characterized by eruption of the 
herpetic vesicles.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

May be chill, followed by fever; pain in deglutition; 
throat dry and hot; eruptions rupture, leaving circular 
ulcers, which coalesce and become covered with fibrinous 
exudation. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Thorough General Treatment of the Neck (page 393), 
manipulating very thoroughly the tonsils, palate, uvula, and 
pharynx. 

2. In case of fever, hold the vaso-motor (page 253) three 
or four minutes. 

GLOSSITIS. 
(Inflammation of the tongue. May be acute or chronic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Tongue swollen, red, and painful; impairment of speech 
and deglutition. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Thorough General Treatment of the Neck (page 393), 

2. Manipulate the tongue, giving it strong extension, 
and endeavoring, in any possible manner, to free its 
circulation. 



THE THROAT. 429 

GLOSSANTHRAX. 
(Malignant pustule upon the tongue.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Same as anthrax in general; appearance of crust of 
dead tissue on the tongue. 

Not treated by osteopaths. 

GLOSSOPHYTIA, NIGRITIES^ OR BLACK TONGUE. 

(Dark discoloration of the tongue from 
epithelium accumulation.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Papillae discolored, tliickened, and elongated; appear- 
ance of hairy growth on the tongue; scaling takes place. 
Not treated by osteopaths. 

LEUKOPLAKIA LINGUALIS. 
(Peculiar chronic affection of the tongue, characterized by 
horny whitish patches on the surface. May affect the 
buccal mucous membrane.) 
Not treated by osteopaths. 

GLOSSAL ULCER. 

(May be Simple, Dyspeptic, Aphthous, or Traumatic.) 

Simple ulcer forms in center of the tongue or inflamed 
area, and is smooth, red, and glazed. 

Dyspeptic or catarrhal ulcer occurs on the tip or dorsum 
near the tip, and is small, superficial, red, and irritable. 

Aphthous ulcer has same symptoms as when occuring in 
the mouth. Found both in adults and children. 

Traumatic ulcer may occur from bad teeth. When active, 
may be mistaken for syphilitic, tuberculous, or cancerous 
ulcer. 



430 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. General Treatment of the Keck (page 393), being 
particularly thorough in the front and sides, working as 
deeply as possible under the superior maxillary. 

2. Thorough manipulation of the tongue, working as 
deeply around the root as possible, and giving the tongue 
thorough extension. 

Treatment should be given each day. 

CATARRHAL STOMATITIS. 

(Catarrhal inflammation of the mucous membrane of the 

mouth. May be due to extension from adjacent disease.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Redness and swelling; increased secretion and heat; 
taste impaired and breath fetid. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Oeneral Treatment of the Neck (page 393), being 
very thorough in the front and sides, working very deeply 
under the inferior maxillary. 

2. Place the index finger in patient's mouth, and manip- 
ulate the mucous membrane carefully but thoroughly. 

Treatment should be given each day. 

APHTHOUS STOMATITIS, OR APHTHAE. 
(Local area of inflammation in the mouth, followed by 

ulceration.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Yellowish-white spots dotted over the mucous mem- 
brane inside the cheeks and roof of mouth along the tongue 
and gum. 



TEE THROAT. 431 

TREATMENT. 

See Catarrhal Stomatitis (page 430). 

ULCERATIVE STOMATITIS, OR NOMA. 
(Another form of ulceration attending inflammation of the 
mouth. May accompany chronic diarrhea, and is 
peculiar to unsanitary conditions.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Inflammation more pronounced on the gums, which are 
swollen, red, and covered with ulcers, on which appears a yel- 
lowish material; flow of saliva is increased, and acid in 
reaction. 

TREATMENT. 
See Catarrhal Stomatitis (page 430). 

GANGRENOUS STOMATITIS, OR CANCRUM ORIS. 

(Gangrenous inflammation of the gums, mucous membrane, 

and deep tissues of the cheeks. Peculiar to children.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

At first small, dark, red, hard spot on the cheek, becom- 
ing purple; cheek becomes swollen, tense, and brawny; 
blister forms, which soon breaks, with rapid ulceration; 
ulcer dark, and soon perforates the cheek; characteristic 
odor. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

PARASITIC STOMATITIS, OR THRUSH. 

(Mycotic inflammation of the mucous membrane of the mouth 

and throat. Peculiar to children.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Raised white patches, appearing like small curds of 
milk; secretion of mouth acid in reaction. 



432 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

1. General Treatment of tlie Neck (page 393). 

2. Careful manipulation of the mucous membrane of 
the mouth and throat with the index finger. 

STOMATITIS MATERNA, OR NURSING SORE MOUTH. 

(Painful, solitary ulcers in mucous membrane of lips and 

cheeks of nursing-women.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. Thorough General Treatment of the Neck (page 393). 
working as deeply as possible under the inferior maxillary. 

2. 'With the index finger manipulate thoroughly the 
mucous membrane of the mouth, being particularly thorough 
in the region of the ulcer. 

Treatment should be given every day; and never fails to 
give immediate relief, and continuation of the treatment a 
speedy cure. 

MERCURIAL STOMATITIS. PTYALISM, OR SALIVATION. 

(Due to medicinal ingestion of large quantities of mercury, 

affecting the gums and salivary glands.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
The gums swollen, red, sore, and bleed easily; teeth 
become loosened; breath fetid; pain in mastication; tongue 
may be swollen. 

TREATMENT. 

Is often benefited by thorough General Treatment of the 
Neck (page 393). 



THE SKIN. 433 



Diseases of the Skin. 



ECZEMA (SCALD-HEAD, SALT-RHEUM, MOIST OR 
RUNNING TETTER). 

(Inflammation and scaling of the skin, with exudation of 
lymph from small vesicles, followed by scaling off of the 
scarf-skin.) 

TREATMENT. 

This disease is caused by an obstruction to the lym- 
phatic circulation, and is easily cured, except in rare in- 
stances, by thorough manipulation of the entire body, to 
free the circulation, being very thorough in the immediate 
region of the disease. 

The extremities, upon which the eczema makes its 
appearance, should be given strong flexion, abduction, 
adduction, rotation, and extension, and the diseased portion 
kneaded gently, but as thoroughly as conditions will permit. 

See Treatment to Equalize the Circulation (jjage 114). 

Treatment should be given each day, until recovery. 

RASH. 

(Exanthematous eruptions of the skin.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Eczema (above). 



434 , OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

BOILS. 

(Localized abscesses of the skin ; a purulent tumor seated in 
the skin or subcutaneous tissue, painful and highly 
inflammatory, characterized by the formation and final 
expulsion of a fibrous mass of dead tissue called the core.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Eczema (page 433). 

PIMPLES. 

(Small purulent elevations of the skin.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Eczema (page 433). 

^ CARBUNCLE. 

(An inflammatory gangrenous tumor iuTolving the skin and 
cellular tissue beneath and presenting a large circum- 
scribed inflamed area of the subcutaneous tissue.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. Thorough but careful manipulation in the immedi- 
ate region of the carbuncle, moving the muscles in all direc- 
tions very deeply in an effort to free the circulation ; move 
the carbuncle gently from side to side. 

2. Should the carbuncle be located on the neck, place 
one hand under the chin, the other under the occipital bone, 
and give slow but strong extension of the neck. 

3. Give very gentle extension of the neck, rotating the 
head from side to side. 

4. Should the carbuncle be located below the first dor- 
sal, grasp the patient's shoulders, an assistant holding the 
feet, and give strong extension. 

Treatment should be given each day, and will occupy ten 
minutes. 



TEE SKIN. 435 

PARONYCHIA, PANARITIUM, WHITLOW, OR FELON. 

(Inflammation arising in the phalanges of the fingers — rarely 
^ ever in the toes — generally advancing to suppuration. 
Its seat may be in the skin, tendons, periosteum, or in 
the cellular tissue under the nail, or may affect the bone. 
It may arise spontaneously, or may be caused by the 
prick of a needle, a pin, or a thorn.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Burning, shooting, pain; swelling may arise, and may 
extend up the arm. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place one hand upon the shoulder, with the other 
grasp the elbow, the arm of the patient being flexed; rotate 
the arm slowly but strongly, bringing it forward, upward, 
close to the face and above the head, then outward and down- 
ward, thus stretching the muscles and freeing the circulation 
immediately over the axillary and brachial arteries and 
veins. 

2. Grasp the patient's hand, giving the arm quite 
strong extension; at the same time, with the disengaged 
hand, beg"inning close to the axilla, move the muscles from 
side to side the entire length of the arm, thus freeing the ven- 
ous and capillary circulation. 

3. Manipulate the flesh in the immediate region of the 
felon, gently but very thoroughly, endeavoring to move the 
muscles immediately under the felon. 

This treatment will give immediate relief, and, unless 
the felon has reached an advanced stage, a speedy cure. 



436 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

DERMATOMYCOSIS. 

(A vegetable parasitic disease of the skin.) 

TREATMENT. 

Thorough manipulation of the affected parts, with a 
view of freeing the circulation. 

Also Treatment to Equalize the Circulation (page 114). 

EERMATORRHEA. 

''MoT-bid increase of skin-secretion.) 

TREATMENT. 

Se,e Treatment to Equalize the Circulation (page 114). 

OTHER SKIN DISEASES. • 
Almost all skin diseases, no matter by what name they 
may be designated, can always be benefited, and in the great 
majority of instances entirely cured, by applying the Treat- 
ment to Equalize the Circulation (page 114), and, where 
it is deemed necessary, such local treatment as their 
peculiarities may give reason for. Included in these dis- 
eases may be mentioned. Acne, or Maggot-pimple; Xeroder- 
mia, Androsis, or Dry Skin; Comedo, Face-worm, or Black- 
head; Blebs; Dermatitis, or Cytitis ; Pityriasis, Branny Tet- 
ter, Dander, or Dandruff ; Dermahemia; Dermatolysis; Der- 
matonosis; Dystrophy; Erythema; Pemphigus, Water-blebs, 
or Bladder Fever; Furuncles; Shingles, or Herpes Zoster; 
Scleroderma, or "Hide-bound"'; Hyperidrosis, or Excessive 
Sweat; Impetigo, or Crusted Scall; Psoriasis, Scally Tetter, 
Dry Scale, Washerwoman's Scall, or Baker's Itch; Sycosis, 
or Barber's Itch; Lichen; Tinere, or Ring- worm; Itching; 
and Melanopathia. 



TEE BLADDEF. 437 



Diseases of the Bladder. 



THE BLABBER. 

The bladder is a musculo-membranous sac situated in 
the pelvis, behind the pubes, and in front of the rectum in the 
male, and serving as the reservoir for the urine. In the 
female the cervix uteri and upper part of the vagina interven- 
ing between the bladder and the rectum. The shape, posi- 
tion, and relations of the bladder are largely influenced by 
age, sex, and the degree of distension of the organ. During 
infancy it is conical in shape, and projects above the upper 
border of the os pubis into the hypogastric region. In the 
adult, when quite empty and contracted, it, together with the 
urethra, in a median vertical section, is Y-shaped, the 
urethra forming the stem of the Y. It is placed deeply in the 
pelvis, flattened from before backward, reaching as high as 
the upper border of the symphysis pubis. When slightly dis- 
tended, it has a rounded form, still being contained within the 
pelvic cavity. When greatly distended, it may reach nearly 
as high as the umbilicus. The bladder, when distended, is 
slightly curved forward toward the anterior wall of the abdo- 
men, so as to be more convex behind than in front. In the 
female it is larger in the transverse than in the vertical diam- 
eter, and its capacity is greater than in the male. When 
moderately distended, it contains about a pint. 

The base of the bladder is directed downward and back- 
ward. It varies in extent according to its state of dis- 



438 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

tension, being very broad when full, but much narrower 
when empty. 

In the male it rests upon the second portion of the rec- 
tum, from which it is separated by a reflexion of the recto- 
vesical fascia. 

The portion of the bladder in relation with the rectum 
corresponds to a triangular space, bounded in front by the 
prostate gland, and on each side by the vesicula seminalis 
and vas deferens. 

In the female the base of the bladder lies in contact with 
the cervix uteri and upper part of the anterior wall of the 
vagina. 

The neck of the bladder is the point of commencement of 
the urethra. The portion of the bladder immediately sur- 
rounding it is in relation with the prostate gland. 

ligaments. — The bladder is retained in its place by liga- 
ments, which are divided into true and false, there being five 
of each. 

Blood-Vessels. — The arteries supplying the bladder are 
the middle, superior, and inferior vesical in the male, with 
additional branches from the uterine and vaginal in the 
female. They are all derived from the anterior trunk of the 
internal iliac. The obturator and sciatic arteries also send 
small branches to the bladder. 

The veins form a complicated plexus around the neck, 
sides, and base of the bladder, and terminate in the internal 
iliac vein. ^ 

Nerves. — The nerves are derived from the pelvic plexus 
of the sympathetic, and from the third and fourth sacral 
nerves, the former supplying the upper part of the bladder, 
the latter its base and neck. 

Closnre. — The internal vesical sphincter, which consists 



THE BLADDER. 439 

of non-striped muscle, is an integi'al part of the muscular coat 
of tlie bladder, and surrounds the orifice of the urethra as far 
down as the prostatic portion, just above the colliculus semi- 
nalis. It is, however, not the sphincter muscle; the proper 
sphincter urethrge lies below the latter. It is a circular 
muscle disposed around the urethra, close above the en- 
trance of the urethra into the septum urogenitale at the apex 
of the prostate, where it exchanges fibers with the deep 
transverse muscle of the perineum which lies under it. 

Urine Accumulation and Micturition. — After emptying 
the bladder, the urine slowly collects again, the bladder 
being thereby gradually distended. As long as there is a 
moderate amount of urine in the bladder, the elasticity of the 
elastic fibers surrounding the urethra, and that of the sphinc- 
ter of the urethra (and the prostate in the male), suffices to 
retain the urine in the bladder. If the bladder be greatly 
distended, so that its apex projects above the pubes, the sen- 
sory nerves in its walls are stimulated and cause a feeling of 
a full bladder, while at the same time the urethral opening is 
dilated, so that a few drops of urine pass into the urethra. 
Besides the subjective feeling of a full bladder, this tension 
of the walls of the bladder causes a reflex effect, so that the 
urinary bladder contracts periodically upon its fluid con- 
tents, and so do the sphincter of the urethra and the muscu- 
lar fibers of the urethra, thus closing the urethra against the 
passage of these drops of urine. As long as the pressure 
within the bladder is not very high, the reflex activity of the 
transversely striped sphincter overcomes the other (as during 
sleep) ; as the pressure rises and the distension increases, the 
contraction of the walls of the bladder overcomes the closure 
produced by the sphincter and the bladder is emptied, as 
occurs normally in young children. 

-28- 



440 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

As age advances, the sphincter urethi-pe comes under the 
control of the will, so that it can be contracted voluntarily, 
as occurs in man when he forcibly contracts the bulbo-caver- 
nosus muscle to retain urine in the bladder. The sphincter 
ani usually contracts at the same time. The reflex activity 
of the sphincter may also be inhibited voluntarily, so that it 
may be completely relaxed. This is the condition when the 
bladder is emptied voluntarily. 

The Nerves Concerned in the Retention and Evacuation of 
the TJrine are : (1) the motor nerves of the sphincter urethrse, 
which lie in the pudendal nerve from the anterior roots of the 
third and fourth sacral nerves ; (2) the sensory nerves of the 
urethra, which excite these reflexes, and leave the spinal cord 
by the posterior roots of the third, fourth, and fifth sacral 
nerves. Section or paralysis of these nerves causes incon- 
tinence of urine. Stimulation of the sensory nerves causes 
reflex contraction of the bladder and evacuation of the urine. 

CYSTITIS. 
(Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the bladder. Due 
to local irritation or to infection. May be acute or 
chronic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Frequent desire to micturate; evacuation of small 
quantity of urine, with burning pain; j)ain in the epigastric 
region; in acute form, urine acid reaction, alkaline in 
chronic. 

TREATMENT. 
1. Place the patient on the side ; beginning at the eighth 
dorsal vertebra, move the muscles upward and outward thor- 
oughly and deep, to the lower extremity of the sacrum. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 



THE BLADDER. 441 

2. Place the hand against the sacrum, the patient lying 
on the side; with the disengaged hand draw the limbs slowly 
backward as far as patient can stand without too much pain. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

3. Place the hand lightly over the bladder, and give 
gentle but strong vibration (pages 36 and 67) two minutes. 

Treatment will occujjy ten minutes, and should be given 
each day until recovery. 

INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS. 

(Inflammation of the walls of the bladder between the 
mucous membrane and peritoneum.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Same as Cystitis, with peritoneal complications. 

TREATMENT. 

See Cystitis (page 440). 

VESICAL CALCULUS. 

(Stone in the bladder.) 

SY^MPTOMS. 

Similar to Cystitis, with vesical tenesmus; obstruction 
to discharge of urine, which may contain blood. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease is sometimes benefited and cured by osteo- 
pathic treatment, but is not treated very successfully. 

See Cystitis (page 440). 



442 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

VESICAL NEOPLASM. 

(New growths or tumor in the bladder.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Paroxysms of vesical tenesmus, and hemorrhage; urine 
may contain cellular evidence. 

TREATMENT. 

See Cystitis (page 440). 

RETENTION OF URINE. 

(Inability to expel urine from the bladder.) 

CAUSE. 
May be due to calculus, tumor, stricture, enlarged pros- 
tate, congestion, vesical paralysis, hysteria, etc. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Tumor in hypogastric region, tender to the touch, dull- 
ness on percussion ; respiration short and shallow ; flashes of 
heat; hot dry skin. 

trea^tme:?^. 

1. This trouble, except when due to calculus, strict- 
ure, tumor, or paralysis, is usually quickly relieved by thor- 
ough manipulation and stimulation of the spinal muscles 
and nerves from the eighth dorsal to the end of the sacrum, 
stimulating especially in the sacral regions, together with 
thorough vibration (pages 36 and 67) of the bladder. 

2. It is also advisable to flex the limbs very strongly 
against the abdomen, holding them a few seconds in this 
position, thus stretching the muscles in the lumbar region. 

3. In case of enlargement of the prostate gland, in addi- 
tion to the above treatment, which should be given each day. 



TEE BLADDER. 443 

the prostate should be treated locallT once each week. The 
finger should be thoroughly oiled with vaseline and passed 
carefully up the rectum, after which the prostate should be 
manipulated in a careful manner, with a view of freeing the 
circulation. It is remarkable how soon the prostate gland 
can be reduced by this method of treatment. 

Cases of calculus, stricture, paralysis, and tumor have 
also been benefited, and occasionally cured, by the above 
treatment. The results, however, in those troubles are not so 
pronounced. 

INCONTINENCE OF URINE, ENURESIS, OR BED-WETTING. 

(Involuntary discharge of the urine. May be due to paralysis 

or relaxation of the compressor urethne muscle.) 

TREATMENT. 

Children who have no control over their urine can usu- 
ally be cured entirely of this annoying habit, in one or two 
treatments, by pressing on the sacrum, close to the last lum- 
bar vertebra, and raising the limbs slowly, but as high as the 
patient can stand T\ithout pain (cut 28). This treatment is 
as reliable as mathematics. 

Adults who from infancy have been troubled with this 
disease can almost always be cured in from one to four 
weeks by the above treatment. 

Among the many cases cured by us of this trouble we 
will mention our first experience in this line. A young man 
of Kirksville, Mo., hearing that we were investigating this 
subject, called at our ofiice, and, after explaining that he had 
no control over his urine and had been expending all his earn- 
ings in vain hope of relief, asked us to take his case. Not 
ha-ving a table at that time, we caused him to lie on his stom- 
ach on the floor, and, placing the right foot between his 



444 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

thighs and the left on the sacrum, with an ankle in either 
hand, we raised the limbs, sprung down the sacrum, and 
asked him to call again on the second day. While adminis- 
tering the third treatment we inquired as to results, and 
were not only gratified, but surprised, to learn that he had 
had no trouble since the first treatment. Two years later 
the young man was still in perfect health. We might men- 
tion also a gentleman 82 years of age, of Lewistown, Mo., 
troubled with this disease for over thirty years. He was 
entirely cured in four weeks by this method of treatment. 

DYSURIA. 

(Difficult and painful micturition.) 

TEEATMENT. 

See Cystitis (page 440). 



THE RECTUM. 445 



Diseases of the Rectum and Anus. 



PROCTITIS. 

(Inflammation of the rectum. Usually due to constipation. 

May be acute or chronic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Sensation of burning, Tsith desire to go to stool ; spasm of 
the sphincter ani muscle; discharges usually only mucous, 
but may be mixed with blood ; pain in the rectum, radiating 
to the hips and back. Chronic form differs only in degree. 

TEEATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
sixth dorsal vertebra, move the muscles upward and outward 
gently but deeply to the end of the coccyx, bv^ing very thor- 
ough in all regions where any abnormal temperature or ten- 
derness is manifest. Treat the opposite side in a similar 
manner. 

2. Flex the limbs strongly against the abdomen, hold- 
ing them in this position a few seconds. 

In case of constipation, see Constipation Treatment 
(page 150). 

3. Place the patient on the side, the limbs flexed; oil 
the finger with vaseline, and pass carefully up the rectum, 
manipulating the rectum gently but thoroughly, with a view 
of freeing the circulation. 



446 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

Treatment will occupy about ten or fifteen minutes, and 
should be given every other day until recovery, except the 
No. 3, which shoud only be given once a week. 

It is always advisable in cases of rectal trouble to flush 
the bowels occasionally in case the patient is constipated. 

HEMORRHOIDS, OR PILES. 

(Small blood tumors near the anal orifice. Distension of 
hemorrhoidal veins, with inflammation and swelling. 
May be internal or external, bleeding or blind.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

A sensation of heat, fullness, and perhaps itching, is 
felt about the anus; the swelling increases until small tumors 
form, which are sore and painful ; these may be external and 
visible or internal, and are often of a bluish color, and, when 
inflamed, they are very sore and painful to the touch. There 
is frequently a discharge of blood, especially from internal 
piles, and such discharges often return repeatedly until a 
habit is established, and there is a Seeling of fullness before, 
and relief after such discharges. 

Piles that do not bleed are called blind piles ; this variety 
is apt to take on inflammation, when they become full, appear 
ready to burst, and are so very sensitive the patient can 
neither sit, lie down, nor walk. 

CAUSE. 
Piles are really a varicose condition of the rectum, and 
are usually the result of an obstruction of the hemorrhoidal 
veins. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Piles are often caused by constipation, and in such 
cases our Constipation Treatment (page 150) will usually 
effect a cure. 



TEE RECTUM. 447 

2. Place the patient on the face; and, with a thumb 
on each side of the spine, beginning at the first sacral ver- 
tebra, move the muscles very deeply upward and outward 
from the spine, working down to the end of the coccyx. 

3. If the patient has itching or bleeding piles, pass the 
index finger its entire length up the rectum, very carefully 
moving the inner muscles from side to side, thus freeing the 
circulation. In protruding piles they should be replaced, 
and the same internal treatment given. 

There is no danger in this treatment, and we have never 
known it to fail to effect a cure in from six to eight weeks. 
The internal treatment, which is rather painful, should be 
given but once a week, and always after flushing the bowels. 
Most cases of piles can be cured simply by our Constipation 
Treatment, which removes the usual cause of this distressing 
complaint. 

Of the many aggravated cases cured by us, we will men- 
tion the ease of a gentleman of Scammon, Kansas, whose 
piles protruded an inch and had not been replaced for 
twenty years. We took the case as an experiment, hardly 
hoping to effect a cure. In three weeks our patientj was 
entirely well, and up to the present time has had no return 
of his old trouble. 

Piles and fistula are sometimes caused by dislocation of 
the coccyx, in which case dislocation must be reduced. See 
Dislocation of the Coccyx (below). 

DISLOCATION OF THE COCCYX. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Manipulate the muscles carefully and very thor- 
oughly in the immediate region of the coccyx. 

2. Dip the finger in vaseline, and pass carefully up the 
rectum, and with the thumb and finger endeavor to work the 



448 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

coccyx gradually back to its normal position. Care must be 
taken not to use a great deal of strength, but to gain a little 
each treatment until the desired result is attained. 

A great many very stubborn cases of the above diseases 
have been cured by simply reducing a dislocation of the 
coccyx. 

The internal treatment should not be given oftener than 
once a week. 

RECTAL CARCINOMA. 

(Cancer of the rectum.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Uneasiness in the rectum; pain in back, hips, and thighs; 
bowels obstructed; frequent discharges of a fetid muco-puru- 
lent matter streaked with blood. May be constipation or 
diarrhea. 

No cure Ml Osteopathy. 

RECTAL VLCER. 

(Not frequent. Detected by palpation.) 

TREATMENT. 
See Hemorrhoids, or Piles (page 446). 



TTlie Anus. 



PROLAPSUS ANI. 

(Eversion of the lower portion of the rectum, and protruding 
through the anus. Most common in infancy and old 
age.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side, the limbs flexed; dip 



THE AXUS. 449 

the index finger in vaseline, and carefully replace tlie pro- 
lapsed portion of the rectum to its normal position ; pass the 
finger carefully up the rectum, manipulating the muscles 
internally as thoroughly as possible. 

2. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the eighth 
dorsal, more the muscles upward and outward, gently but 
deep, to the lower part of the coccyx. Treat the opposite 
side in a similar manner. 

3. See Constipation Treatment (page 150). 

4. Bowels should be flushed each day until a cure is 
effected. 

Internal treatment should not be given oftener than 
once each week. 

See Dislocation of the Coccyx (page 447). 

FISTULA IN ANO. 

(Abnormal tube-like passage by the side of the rectum, 
through fibers of the sphincter ani muscle.) 

TREATMENT. 

Manipulate the muscles thoroughly and deep around the 
fistula; dip the index finger in vaseline and pass carefully up 
the rectum, manipulating the fistula in a careful but very 
thorough manner. 

Treatment should be given once each week until 
recovery. 

COMPLETE FISTULA. 

(Has an external opening near the anus and another in the 
bowels above the rectum.) 
Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 



450 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

INCOMPLETE EXTERNAL FISTULA. 
(Has an external opening, but none in the bowels.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Fistula in Ano (page 449). 

INCOMPLETE INTERNAL FISTULA. 
(Has an opening into the bowels, but none externally.) 
Not treated successfully by Osteopathy, 

ANAL FISSURE. 

(A small chap, crack, or ulcer in the anal orifice, usually 
behind. G-ives intense pain during defecation.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. In case of constipation, see Constipation Treatment 
(page 150). 

2. Manipulate the muscleif thoroughly and deeply in 
the immediate region of the fissure, both externally and 
internally. 

Treatment should be given twice a week; an immediate 
improvement will be noticed, and a cure can be expected in 
from four to eight weeks. 



THE BOXES AND JOINTS. 451 



Diseases of Bones and Joints. 



SPONDYLITIS, SPINAL OSTITIS, SPINAL CARIES, OR 
POTT'S DISEASE. 

(A progressive inflammaton' lesion of the vertebral bodies, or 
tbe intervertebral disks. Chronic in character, leading 
to partial or complete destruction of the vertebrae, and 
terminates in anchylosis, with a characteristic posterior 
deformity. It is considered a tuberculous disease of 
the spine, and may occur in the cervical, dorsal, or lum- 
bar region.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Eestlessness; fatigue on slight exertion; pallor of the 
skin; anorexia; irritability; tendency to lean against 
objects. 

If in the cervical region, head frequently held to one 
side; pain in the pharynx, side of the neck, the larynx, and 
the esophagus. 

If in the dorsal region, patient frequently leans forward, 
and in stooping does not bend the back. Pain in the stomach 
'or intestines or chest walls. 

If in the lumbar region, patient frequently leans for- 
Avard over a chair or couch, to relieve the weight of the body 
from the injured vertebrae; body inclined to one side, and fre- 
quently holds one limb forward. Pain in the intestines 
liver, or other abdominal viscera. 

There is usually paralysis of the lower extremities, fol 
lowed by posterior angular curvature. 



452 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. , 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward, 
gently but deep, the entire length of the spinal column, being 
ex(< edinglr thorough in the immediate region of the diseased 
vcrtebrse. 

2. An assistant grasping the shoulders, another the 
feet, give gentle extension, as the operator at the same time 
endeavors, by gentle pressure -and manipulation, to force the 
vertebrae back to their normal position. The extension 
should not be continued over three or four minutes each 
treatment; neither should sufficient strength be used to pain 
or exhaust the patient. 

This treatment will cure Pott's disease if taken in its 
early stages, and will be found very beneficial, strengthening 
and invigorating the patient at almost any stage of the 
disease. * 

SPINAL CUEVATURE. 

(The curvature may be anterior, posterior, or lateral.) 

CAUSE. 

Curvature may be caused by long-continued, unequal 
compression of the intervertebral cartilages. 

Lordosis is usually found in the lumbar region, and is 
simply an exaggeration of the normal curve, with convexity 
forward, due to some deformity or diseased condition, such 
as rickets, congenital femoral luxation, coxalgia, etc. 

» Kyphosis (humpback) is an exaggeration of the normal 
dorsal curve, causing convexity of the back, resulting from 
debility, rickets, or occupation requiring constant stooping. 

Scoliosis appears most frequently in girls between the 
ages of fourteen and eighteen. There are usually two lateral 



THE BOSES AKD JOINTS. 



453 



enrvfitures. Their convexities are turned in opposite 
directions. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pain and fatigue in the back and shoulders when sitting; 
projection of scapula, wing-like; undue prominence of the 
iliac crest of the affected side, with projection of the breast 
on the opposite side. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; move the muscles up- 
ward and outward the entire length of the spinal column, 
being very thorough in the region of the curvature. Treat 
the o]3posite side in a similar manner. 

2. In case of lordosis, a thorough extension of the spine 
should be given. Should always treat with a view of remov- 
ing the primary cause. 

2. In case of kyphosis, place the patient on the face; an 
operator, grasping the shoulders, draws the i)atient, head and 
shoulders, over the end of the table, until the upper border 
of the curvature is a few inches beyond its end. The opera- 
tor now places his thumbs upon the spinous process at the 
upper border of the curvature; the head and shoulders of the 
patient will now be lowered as far as possible, the operator 
making strong pressure with the thumbs as the patient is 
raised to a level with the table. Place the thumbs on the 
next lower vertebra, lower the head and shoulders as before, 
and i-epeat until the lower border of the curvature is reached. 
It in always advisable, if convenient, to have a second assist- 
ant grasp the ankles of the patient, in which case strong 
extension can be given as the head and shoulders are brought 
to a level with the table, as the operator makes strong 
pressure upon the spinous process. 



454 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

4. In case of scoliosis, place the patient on the face; the 
tliurabF, ijpon the side of the first spinous process which is 
out of line, the operator standing at the side of the table 
toward the convexity, an assistant grasps the shoulders of 
the patient, a second passes one hand under the limbs just 
abo% e ihe knees and draws the limbs slowly away from the 
operator, on a level with the table, as far as the patient can 
stand without too much inconvenience, the patient relaxing 
alJ muscles; as the limbs are brought back to their former 
position strong extension should be given, the operator 
pressing hard with the thumbs on the spinous process at the 
instanl the body, under strong extension, arrives at its 
fO'i'raer position. Move the thumbs down to the next spi- 
noiis process, give abduction, adduction, and extension, as 
before, and repeat until the lower border of the curvature is 
reached. 

The curvature upon the opposite side should be treated 
in a similar manner. 

Jt is usually advisable in all cases of curvature of the 
spine to give a thorough General Treatment (page 306), to 
tone up and equalize the entire system. 

This treatment Avill occupy about twenty or thirty 
jainutes. An immediate change for the better will be 
noticed, and the treatment should be continued every other 
day until recovery. 

EIGKETS. OE RACHITIS. 

(A disease of early childhood, chiefly due to deficient nutri- 
tion, characterized by softening of the bones, especially 
of the spine, and consequent deformity.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Lones are soft and yielding; muscles flabby; child 
feeble, also inactive, resembling paralysis; sides of chest 
flattened; sternum projects; digestion impaired. 



THE BOXES AXD JOIXTS. 455 

TREATMENT. 

If taken in time, this disease can be cured. After it has 
become fully developed, it can be materially benefited by the 
following treatment: 

1, Careful and through manipulation of all contracted 
muscles. 

1!. Place the patient on the back; two assistants grasp- 
ing the shoulders and feet, give careful extension, the patient 
cautioning them when too much strength is used; the opera- 
tor now gently forces the soft, yielding bones toward their 
normal position. 

(4reat care should be exercised not to overdo matters, 
siujply endeavoring to gain a little each treatment, which 
should be given every other day, occupying about ten or 
fifteen minutes. 

We might mention, in this connection, the case of a little 
girl, twelve years of age, which we treated very successfully 
at Cherokee, Kas. The disease first manifested itself eight 
years pre\ious, since which time she had been almost con- 
stantly under treatment in various sanitariums of the West; 
gradaally failing, until the pressure upon the spinal cord was 
so great as to cut off communication between the brain and 
lower extremities, thus causing paralysis of the lower limbs. 
The ribs were in such position as to affe:-t the heart and lungs, 
n earing of Osteopathy, the father called us in to examine 
aiid treat the child, who was absolutely helpless, and in 
almost a dying condition. After four weeks of treatment 
the little one could walk, and in four months was able to 
attend school, for the first time in her brief career. The 
abo^e results in such hopeless cases as this are the exception 
and not the rule. 

. —29— 



456 OSTEOPATHY COMPLFTE. 

CRETINISM. 

(Endemic disease, with deficient development of the 
organism.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Body under-sized; head broad and shallow; eyes far 
apart; nose flat; hands broad; hair stiff; skin dry and 
rough; and intellect impaired. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

AKEOMEGALIA. 

(Hypertrophy of the bones of hands, feet, and face.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Usually spinal curvature; soft parts undergo enlarge- 
ment; thyroid gland may be atrc^hied or hypertrophied; 
headache; stature may increase. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

ARTHRITIS. 

(Inflammation beginning in either the synovial membrane or 

the bone, and affecting all the structures of a joint.) 

CAUSE. 

Acute form may be traumatic or infective, due to pye- 
mia, gonorrhea, etc. Chronic form is usually diathetic, due 
to struma, gout, rheumatism, etc. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Heat, redness, and edema; crepitus, tenderness, pain; 
swelling, involving the entire joint; atrophy of the muscles 
of the affected limb; fever, when there is suppuration, and 
jh'isses to the typhoid or hectic type. 



TEE BONES AND JOINTS. 457 



TREATMENT. 



In case the difficulty is iu the shoulder-joint : 
J, Place the patient on the side opposite the shoulder 
aff(M*ted; beainning at the upper cervicals, move the muscles 
upward and outward, gently but yevj deep, to the lower bor- 
der of the scapula. 

2. Place the flexed arm of the patient against the 
radirs and ulna of the operator, whose arm should be in a 
Hexed position (cut 7); using the arm as a lever, press the 
shoulder upward and outward, thus stretching and freeing 
The muscles beneath the scapula. 

3. Place one hand upon the shoulder, pressing the 
muscles outward over the point of the acromion process; 
with the disengaged hand grasp the patient's arm at the 
elbow, which should be flexed, rotating the arm slowly, 
gently but as strong as possible, forward, upward, backward, 
and downward (cut 30). 

4. Place the hand in the axilla, with the other grasp 
the patient's wrist, giving gentle but quite strong extension 
of the arm. 

Great care must be exercised, in giving the above treat- 
ment, to give the patient no unnecessary pain, seeking to free 
the circulation, and stretch the muscles a little each treat- 
ment until the desired results are obtained. 

Treatment should be given every other day. 

In case the difficulty is in any other joint of the arm, 
the same treatment will apply, being particularly thorough 
in the hnmediate region of the affection. 

In case the difficulty is in the hip-joint: 

1. Place the patient on the side opposite the affected 
hip; beginning at the first lumbar vertebra, move the muscles 
upward and outward, very deep, to the end of the sacrum; 



458 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

also manipulate carefully but very deep all the muscles in 
the immediate region of the affected joint. 

2. Flex the limb slowly, gently, but as strong as possi- 
ble, as far as the patient can stand; giving rather strong 
abduction of the knoe as the limb is gently extended. 

o. Placing one hand against the sacrum, the other on 
the knee, draw the limb slowly backward as far as possible. 

This treatment frees the circulation, and, if given care- 
fully every other day, will effect a speedy cure. 

In case the difficulty is in any other joint of the leg, the 
above tr^eatment should be given, together with careful but 
tluM'ough nianipnlation, llexion, and extension of the joint 
affected. 

SYNOVITIS. 

(Ir.'fiammation of the synovial membrane of the joint. May 
be acute or chronic.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

In acute form, intense pain, worse at night ; tenderness ; 
muscular atrophy; inflammatory fever, with local heat and 
redness. 

In chronic form, symptoms of inflammation are slight or 
wanting; joint weak, but can be used; membrane may be- 
come thickened and indurated from venous congestion, or 
pass into fatty degeneration. 

TREATMENT. 

See Arthritis (page 457). 



THE BONES AND JOIXTS. 459 

COXALGIA, OR KIP-JOINT DISEASE. 

(A strumous arthritis of the hip-joint, occurring usually in 
persons under fifteen years of age. More common in 
boys, and may be tubercular.) 

EXPLANATORY. 

Coxalgia is divided into three varieties: Femoral, begin- 
ning in the upper epiphysis of the femur; Acetabular, involv- 
ing the floor of the acetabulum; Arthritic, beginning as a 
synovitis. It also has three stages: (1) Inflammatory, causing 
flexion and fixation of the joint; (2) Effusive, causing flex- 
ion, abduction, and fixation, with apparent lengthening 
from compensatory curvature of the spine; (3) Suppurative, 
causing flexion, fixation, adduction, and inversion, with 
apparent shortening, due to compensatory curvature of the 
spine in the opposite direction. 

SYMPTOMS. 

In the first stage, pain, usually in the knee; tenderness 
on jarring the femur upward, or on pressing suddenly inward 
on the trochanter; limping, which may wear off in the eve- 
ning; fixation, detected by attempting to flex, extend, and 
rotate the femur. 

In the second stage, pain is more intense; tenderness, 
limj)ing, and fixation are more marked; swelling may be 
apparent, also atrophy. 

In the third stage, flexion, adduction, and inversion, the 
affected thigh crossing the other; pelvis elevated on the dis- 
eased side; shortening, real from wasting, and apparent from 
spinal curvature; suppuration and abscess are common. 



460 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

The femoral form is characterized by starting pain most 
marked at the knee, shortening and luxation as the disease 
progresses. 

The acetabular form shows marked tendency to abscess, 
"which may point from within the pelvis over the nates, or 
above Poupart's ligament. 

The arthritic form approaches nearer to the type of an 
acute inflammation, with sharp pain in the hip-joint, swell- 
ing, etc. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Arthritis (page 457). 

2. If attended by Spinal Curvature, see (page 453). 



HYDRARTHROSIS, OR WHITE SWELLING. 

(Serous eifusion into a joint, usually the knee-joint; gen- 
erally strumous, and occurring in children.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pain, tenderness, swelling, and lameness, at first slight, 
gradually increasing; knee at first flexed, but as the liga- 
ments become softened, and yield, there is a backward dis- 
placement and outward rotation of the tibia on the femur; 
crepitus is marked; abscess may form, opening externally, 
or the joint may become anchylosed. 

TREATMENT. 

See Arthritis (page 457). 

If taken in its early stages, this disease is treated very 
successfully. 



THE BOXES ASD JOIXTS. 461 

ANCHYLOSIS, OR STIFF JOINT. 

(True anchylosis is dependent on articular and intra-articular 
tliickening and adhesion. It may be complete, in which 
case an osseous deposit has united the articular surfaces 
either in part or throughout. Earelv found except after 
traumatic arthritis. It may be incomplete, motion being 
restricted by fibrous union between the joint surfaces. 
False anchylosis is dependent on contractions and adhe- 
sions of the soft parts around the joint.) 

TEEATMEXT. 

1. Give a very thorough manipulation of the muscles 
in the region of the affected joint. • 

2. Gentle but strong flexion and extension of the joint 
affected. 

Treatment should be given each day. These cases are 
rather slow to respond, but a continuation of the treat- 
ment will usually effect a cure, provided the case is not one 
of complete anchylosis. 



SPRAINS. 

(The twisting of a joint, by which the soft parts about it are 
stretched or torn. Muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, 
and blood-vessels may be involved.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Pain and swelling, due to both extravasation of blood 
and inflammatory effusion within and without the joint. 
Discoloration and loss of function. 



462 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Thorough manipulation of the muscles, gentle but 
deep, in the immediate region of the sprain. 

2. Thorough extension and gentle rotation of the joint. 
Treatment should be given every day. Immediate relief 

will follow the first treatment, and a speedy cure may be 
exjjected. 



GYNECOLOGT. 463 



Gynecology— Diseases of Women. 



That our readers may gain a more correct understanding 
of our method of treating diseases peculiar to women, it will 
be necessary to refer to the anatomy. 

THE UTERUS. 

The uterus is the organ of gestation, receiving the 
fecundated ovum in its cavity, retaining and supporting it 
during the development of the fetus, and becoming the 
principal agent in its expulsion at the time of parturition. 
In the virgin state it is pear-shaped, flattened from before 
backward, and situated in the cavity of the pelvis between 
the bladder and rectum; it is retained in its position by the 
round and broad ligament on each side and projecting into 
the vagina below. Its upper end, or base, is directed upward 
and forward; its lower end, or apex, downward and back- 
ward in line of the axis of the inlet of the pelvis. The uterus 
measures about three inches in length, two in breadth at its 
upper part, and nearly an inch in thickness, and weighs from 
an ounce to an ounce and one-half. 

The size, weight, and location of the uterus varies at 
different periods of life and under different circumstances. 
In the fetus the uterus is contained in the abdominal cavity, 
projecting beyond the brim of the pelvis. 

The uterus consists of two parts: the body, with its 
upper broad extremity, the fundus; and the cervix, or neck, 
which is partly above the vagina and partly in the vagina. 

The division between the body and cervix is indicated 
externally by a slight constriction, and by the reflexion of 



464 OSTEOPATHY GOMPL'ETE. 

the peritoneum from the anterior surface of the uterus on to 
the bladder, and internally by a narrowing of the canal, 
called the internal os. 

The body gradually narrows from the fundus to the neck. 
]ts anterior surface is flattened, more than the posterior, cov- 
ered by peritoneum throughout, and separated from the blad- 
der by the utero-vesical pouch. Its posterior surface is con- 
vex transversely, covered by peritoneum throughout, and 
separated from the rectum by some convolutions of the intes- 
tine. Its lateral margins are concave, and give attachment 
to the Fallopian tube above, the round ligament below and 
in front, and the ligament of the ovary behind both of these 
structures. 

The fundus is placed on a line below the level of the 
brim of the pelvis, being directed forward behind the upper 
portion of the anterior pelvic wall. 

The cervix is the lower constricted segment of the uter- 
us; around its circumference is attached the upper end of the 
vagina, which extends upward a greater distance behind 
than in front. 

The supravaginal portion is not covered by peritoneum 
in front; a pad of cellular tissue is interposed between it and 
the bladder. Behind, the peritoneum is extended over its 
upper part. The vaginal portion is the rounded lower end 
projecting into the vagina. On its surface is a small aper- 
ture, the OS uteri, generally circular in shape, but sometimes 
oval. The margin of the opening is, in the absence of past 
parturition or disease, quite smooth. 

Ligaments. — The ligaments of the uterus are eight in 
number: one anterior; one posterior; two lateral or broad; 
two sacral-uterine — all these being formed of peritoneum; — 
and, lastly, two round ligaments. 



GYNECOLOGY. 465 

Cavity. — The cavity of the uterus is small compared with 
the size of the orgau ; that portion of the cavity which corre- 
sponds to the body is triangular, flattened from before back- 
ward, so that its walls are closely approximated, and its base 
is directed upward toward the fundus. At each superior 
angle is a funnel-shaped cavity, which constitutes the re- 
mains of the division of the body of the uterus into two cor- 
nua, and at the bottom of each cavity is the minute orifice of 
the Fallopian tube. At the inferior angle of the uterine cav- 
ity is a small constricted opening, the internal orifice, which 
leads into the cavity of the cervix. 

Blood-Vessels. — The arteries of the uterus are the uterine, 
from the internal iliac, a: d the ovarian, from the aorta. They 
are remarkable for their tortuous course in the substance of 
the uterus, and for their frequent anastomoses. The termi- 
nation of the ovarian artery meets the termination of the 
uterine artery, and forms an anastomotic trunk, from which 
branches are given off to supply the uterus. 

The veins are of large size, and correspond with the 
arteries. Jn the impregnated uterus these vessels are 
termed the uterine sinuses, consisting of the lining mem- 
brane of the veins adhering to the walls of the canal chan- 
nelled through the substance of the uterus. They terminate 
in the uterine plexuses. 

Nerves. — The nerves are derived from the inferior hypo- 
gastric and ovarian plexuses, and from the third and fourth 
sacral nerves. 

At puberty the uterus is pyriform in shape, and weighs 
from eight to ten drachms. It has descended into the pelvis, 
the fundus being just below the level of the brim of the pelvic 
cavity. The arbor vitse is distinct, and extends to the 
upper part of the cavity of the organ. 



466 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

During menstruation the uterus is enlarged, and more 
vasicular, its surfaces rounder; tlie os externum is rounded, 
its labia swollen, and the lining membrane of the body thick- 
ened, softer, and of a darker color. At each recurrence of the 
menstruation a molecular disintegration of the mucous mem- 
brane takes place, which leads to its complete removal, only 
the bases of the glands inbedded in the muscle being left. 
At the cessation of menstruation, by a proliferation of the 
remaining structures, a fresh mucous membrane is formed. 

The uterus being suspended by muscles and ligaments in 
the cavity of the pelvis, and being subject to so many and 
such radical changes, it is in no way surprising that ulcer- 
ation, polypus, cancer, and prolajise of the uterus are so 
very prevalent. 

DISPLACEMENTS OF THE UTERUS. 

The true i^athology or proximate condition of these 
affections is but little understood by the medical profession, 
as is apparent from the general ill success attending the ordi- 
nary treatment. The term prolapsus is used indiscriminately 
for all degrees of simple descent or falling of the woml); but 
some books use the term relaxation when the descent is only 
to the middle of the vagina, procidentia when the uterus 
descends to the labia, and prolapsus when it protrudes exter- 
nally. Retroversion is that form of displacement in which 
the fundus uteri descends toward the sacrum, the os uteri, 
or mouth of the womb, inclining towards the pubes. Antever- 
sion is the reverse of the preceding, the fundus falling for- 
ward and the os uteri inclining backward. In inversion the 
organ is turned inside out while in a state of prolapse. In 
anteflexion the body of the uterus is bent forward on the 
cervix. Retroflexion denotes the permanent backward dislo- 
cation of the fundus uteri, with simultaneous flexion of the 



GYNECOLOGY. 467 

uterus over the posterior surface. In some cases the upper 
part of the vagina protrudes into the lower, constituting 
what is called prolapse of the vagina. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Prolapse of the uterus is attended with a heavy, dis- 
agreeable, or painful dragging-down sensation at the lower 
part of the abdomen, aching or weakness about the small of 
the back, and, when severe, great difficulty or inability in 
walking. At first there is increased mucous secretion, 
which increases by degrees until it acquires the character 
of an obstinate leucorrhea. 

Retroversion of the uterus is attended with irregular or 
constipated bowels, and from the pressure of the displaced 
organ in the rectum behind and urethra in front there is more 
or less difficulty experienced in expelling the contents of the 
bowels and bladder. In this sitiiation the womb often be- 
comes congested, inflammatory, and enlarged, and every 
attempt at walking is exceedingly painful and exhausting. 
In bad cases the patient can only endure a fixed, motionless 
position in her chair or bed. There is, too, usually consider- 
able tenderness and tension of the whole abdomen, 

Anteversion is a less frequent occurrence; it is denoted 
by difficulty in walking, sense of weight or fullness in the 
pelvis, with many of the symptoms of prolapse, and is at- 
tended with much less difficulty in evacuating urine and 
feces than retroversion. 

Inversion is known by the organ hanging down exter- 
nally; it is usually the result of violence in extracting the 
placenta, but may occur from an adhesion of the placenta 
or from polypous tumors. In some instances the falling of 
the uterus or vagina drags the bladder with it, consti- 
tuting what is called complicated prolapse. In this case the 
bladder, being deprived of the expulsory aid of the abdom- 



468 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

iual muscles, is incapable of evacuating its contents without 
artificial assistance. 

Anteftexion must be accompanied by rigidity at tlie point 
of flexion; there are disturbances of bladder functions, and 
symptoms peculiar to inflammation. The os is frequently 
small and the cervix long. The uterus may also, at the same 
time, be retroverted. 

Retroflexion never exists without some degree of retro- 
version. There is pain in the back constantly; reflex neuro- 
ses, excessive, long, and painful menstruation; and condi- 
tions due to the extent of retroversion. The neck is usually 
near the vulva. 

Genital excrescence consists in polypus or other tumors 
issuing from the surface of tlie uterus or vagina ; they are of 
all sizes and various degrees of consistency, from the soft- 
ness of the sponge to the firmness of leather. 

SPECIAL CAUSES. 

Although medical authors and professors of midwifery 
are continually talking about '''relaxation of ligaments," 
which hold the uterus in position, as the main cause of its 
displacement, it i& quite clear that this relaxation has noth- 
ing whatever to do with it; the yielding or elongation of the 
ligament itself being an effect of the displacement. The nat- 
ural supports of the uterus are the vagina and abdominal 
muscles; if the former is greatly relaxed, the uterus will 
descend, and the ligaments, being kept constantly on the 
stretch, will finally elongate more or less; and if the abdom- 
inal muscles are greatly debilitated, they do not contract 
vigorously, so as to keep up equable and uniform compres- 
sion in all the various positions of the body, and hence the 
uterus is liable to fall forward or backward, or to incline 
laterally; and when both are badly relaxed and debilitated, 



GYNECOLOGY. 469 

we find both conditions of displacement — falling down and 
tipping transversely across the pelvis. 

In corroboration of this view of the subject, we may 
advert to the fact that all the cases of uterine displacement 
met with in our practice, with the single and rare exception 
of such as are produced by violence, occur in females who 
suffer from the very circumstances which are most efficient 
in inducing muscular relaxation of these parts, as constipa- 
tion, piles, dyspepsia, nervous debility, mis-menstruation, 
abortions or miscarriages, preternatural labors, etc. 

It is a well-known fact that all cases of female troubles 
are accompanied by a weak, lame hack, and it is to this point 
we trace the real cause of most cases of falling of the womb 
and other troubles peculiar to women. Either by an acci- 
dent or overwork, the muscles of the back, from the first 
lumbar vertebra to the last sacral, have become strained, 
causing contraction and a consequent pressure on the nerves 
which control the organs of generation, thus breaking the 
nervous current from the brain to these parts, interfering 
with the circulation and permitting the muscles and the 
__vagina, which hold the organs of generation in place, to 
relax. The fact that our treatment usually gives immediate 
relief, and in most cases a continuation of the treatment 
effects a permanent cure, is ample proof that in female 
troubles the principles of Osteopathy are far superior to any 
other known method. 

TKEATMEXT FOR DISPLACEMENTS OF THE UTERUS. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the first 
lumbar vertebra, with the fingers close to the spine, move 
the muscles upward and outward, very gently but deep, as 
low as the last sacral vertebra. In the sacral region move 
the muscles very deeply for about two inches on each side, 
as it is here we find tormina which transmit nerves directlv 



470 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

to the organ in question. Treat the opposite iside in a 
similar manner. 

2, Place the patient on the back; flex the limbs slowly 
but strongly against the abdomen, and hold in this position 
for a few seconds, moving them gently from side to side. 

The above treatment stimulates the nerves and frees 
the blood-supply to the weakened muscles and the vagina; 
relaxation and lack of tone being the true cause of this 
disease. 

3. In all cases of constipation the bowels should be 
flushed and the Constipation Treatment (page 150) given. 

4.. Insert the finger irito the vagina and move the 
uterus carefully back to its normal position. It is seldom 
necessary to use an instrument to perform this operation. 

Treatment should be given every other day, except local 
treatment, which should be given no oftener than every 
third or fourth day. In the majority of cases a decided relief 
will be the result of the first treatment. 

In a great many instances a slight dislocation will be 
discovered in the lumbar region — the result of accident or 
a strain. In such instances a speedy cure may be effected by 
reducing the dislocation, in addition to the above treatment. 

See Dislocation of the Lumbar VertebriP (below). 

DISLOCATION OF THE LUMBAR VERTEBRAE. 

TREATMENT. 
Place the patient on the face, the limbs lying perfectly 
straight, the arms hanging over the sides of the table; in this 
position the spinous processes of the lumbar vertebrae should 
be exactly in line and an equal distance should intervene 
between them; place one finger upon each side of the last 
dorsal vertebra, move the fingers carefully down the spine, 
and a slight lateral slip will easily be detected. 



aTNECOLOGT. 471 

In case the spinous processes are thrown up or down, it 
is easily discovered by passing the finger slowly downward 
over the spines. 

In case of a lateral displacement to the right, after man- 
ipulating the muscles gently but deeply in the immediate 
region, place the thumbs upon the spinous process of the 
vertebra at fault, while an assistant, grasping the limbs, 
carries them slowly but quite strongly to the left, bringing 
them with strong extension slowly back to their former 
position, the operator pressing quite hard upon the spinous 
process of the vertebra at fault the instant the limbs, under 
strong extension, are brought back to the median line. Care 
must be exercised not to use sufficient strength to cause the 
patient much pain, the object being to gain a little each treat- 
ment until the cure is efi"ected, which usually requires from 
two to eight weeks' treatment, given every other day. 

In case of a posterior dislocation the patient should be 
placed upon the side, the thumbs of the operator upon the 
spinous process at fault, while the limbs are flexed by an 
assistant strongly against the abdomen, a strong pressure 
being exerted by the operator upon the vertebra at fault as 
the limbs are extended slowly but with strong extension. 

ANTEVERSION. 
(A forward inclination of the entire uterus.) 

CAUSE. 

May be due to tight clothing, violent effort, pregnancy, 
congestion, or dislocation of lumbar vertebrae. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Frequent micturition, due to pressure of the uterus on 
the bladder; may be menorrhagia; other symptoms similar 
to Metritis, Cellulitis, and Peritonitis; the cer\ix is far back 

-30- 



472 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

into the hollow of the sacrum; the fundus approximii t ( s tlie 
symphisis pubis. 

TREATMENT. 

See Displacements of the Uterus (page 469). 

ANTEFLEXION. 

(A bending forward of the uterus, forming an angle at its 

body. It may be congenital or acquired.) 

CAUSE. 

Maj be due to tight clothing, muscular efforts, tumor, 
pregnancy, or a partial dislocation of a lumbar vertebra. 

SYMPTQMS. 

Frequent micturition; dysmenorrhea; leucorrhea; ster- 
ility; the cervix lies rather high, the os directly downward 
and forward. 

TREATMENT. 

See Displacements of the Uterus (page 469). 

RETROVERSION. 

(A backward inclination of the entire uterus.) 

CAUSE. 
May be due to tight and heavy clothing, muscular efforts, 
distended bladder, pregnancy, or partially dislocated verte- 
bra in the lumbar region. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Gnawing pain in the back; constipation; monorrhagia; 
leucorrhea; cervix lies near the symphisis pubis, the fundus 
in the hollow of the sacrum. 



GYNECOLOGY. 473 

TREATMENT. 

See Displacements of the Uterus (page 469). 

RETROFLEXION. 

(A bending backward of the uterus, forming an angle at its 
body. The most frequent of uterine displacements.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Dysmenorrhea; sterility; abortion; cervix lies in its 
place; the fundus appears as a round tumor in the posterior 
fornix of the vagina. 

TREATMENT. 

See Displacements of the Uterus (page 469). 

LATEROFLEXION. 

(A bending of the uterus to the right or left side. Can be 
detected by conjoined manipulation.) 

CAUSE, 

May be due to inflammatory disease, direct pressure, 
increased weight, or partial dislocations in the lumbar region. 

SYMPTOMS. 
May simulate fibrous tumors. 

TREATMENT. 

See Displacements of the Uterus (page 469). 

COMPOUND FLEXIONS. 

(Varieties are: Retro-Anteflexion, Retro-Lateroflexion, Ante- 

Retroflexion, Ante-Later oflexion.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Displacements of the Uterus (page 469). 



474 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

INVERSION. 
(Uterus turned inside out.) 

CAUSE. 

Due to relaxation and inertia of the uterine walls, and 
downward traction or pressure. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Dragging pain in the pelvis; anemia; hemorrhage; 
leucorrhea; general malaise; cupping may be felt on abdo- 
men by the hand. ^ 

May be benefited, but is not treated successfully, by 
Osteopathy. 

PEOLAPSUS UTERI. 

(Falling down of the uterus.) 

CAUSE. 

Due to distension and eversion of the vagina, and impair- 
ment of the splincter vaginae muscle; also relaxation of the 
uterine ligaments. Generally produced by parturition, fol- 
lowed by a lack of tone in the supports. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Dragging sensation in the lower abdomen and back; 
protrusion and excoriation of the parts; gradual descent of 
the vaginal walls, cervix, and body of the uterus; micturi- 
tion diflficult. 

This disease may be benefited by Treatment for Dis- 
placements of the Uterus (page 469), but is not treated very 
successfully by Osteopathy. 



GYy ECOLOGY. 475 

AMENORRHEA. 

(Absence of menstruation between puberty and the meno- 
pause. May be divided into: Emansio Mensium, where 
menstruation has never appeared; Suppressio Mensium, 
where menstruation is suppressed.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
When caused by phthisis, there is emaciation, cough, and 
night sweats; w^hen caused by anemia, there is dyspnea and 
palpitation on exertion ; depraved appetite; headache; consti- 
pation ; hysteria ; pallor, and edema. 

TREATMENT. 
In suppressed menstruation osteopathic treatment, free- 
ing and equalizing the circulation and nerve-wave to the 
genital organs, is remarkably successful, usually giving im- 
mediate relief, and a continuation of the treatment a perma- 
nent cure, except in cases where the suppression of the mem- 
ses is the direct result of tuberculosis. 

1. Place the patient on the face; beginning at the 
eighth dorsal vertebra, with the thumbs upon each side of 
and close to the spinal process, move the muscles upward 
and outward, gently but very deep, the entire length of the 
spine. 

2. Beginning at the first lumbar vertebra, with both 
hands upon the same side of the spine, the fingers close to 
the spine, move the muscles slightly upward and strongly 
outward with quite a strong pressure, permitting the hands 
to slip over the flesh as they are drawn outward. Treat in 
this manner to the lower part of the sacrum, being very 
thorough in the lower lumbar and sacral region. 

3. Place the patient on the back; flex the limbs slowly 
but strongly against the abdomen, hold in this position a few 



476 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

seconds, and then move them gently from side to side with- 
out relaxing the pressure. 

4. One operator grasping the shoulders, an assistant 
the feet, give gentle extension of the spine. 

5. Place the hand lightly over the uterus, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) gently one minute. 

6. It is very often advisable in cases of Amenorrhea, 
or suppressed menstruation, to give such portion of our Gen- 
eral Treatment (page 306) as conditions indicate. It is also 
always advisable to make car^eful examination of the spine, 
endeavoring to detect, if possible, any irregularity in the 
spinous 'processes in the vertebrae of the lumbar region. 
Slight dislocation here, caused by strain or accident, is often 
the cause of serious trouble. See Dislocation of the Lumbar 
Vertebrae (page 470). 

OLIGOMENORRHEA. 

(Insufficient menstrual flow.) 

TEEATMENT. 

See Amenorrhea (page 475). 

MENORRHAGIA. 
(Excessive and long menstrual flow.) 

TEEATMENT. 

1. Place the patient upon the table; beginning at the 
sixth dorsal, with the hands both upon the same side of thf 
spine, move the muscles slightly upward but strongly out- 
ward, pressing quite hard as the hands are permitted to 
slip over the muscles. Treat in this manner to the lower 
sacral. All motions should be very slow and gentle, but as 
hard a pressure used, as the hands are slipped outward from 
the spine, as the patient can stand. 



GYyECOLOOT. 477 

2. With one thumb upon each side of the first lumbar 
vertebra, between it and the second, press gently but very 
strong a few seconds. Treat each successive vertebra in 
a similar manner until the lower vertebra is reached, where 
a little stronger and longer pressure should be given. 

3. Place the patient on the side; with one hand against 
the sacrum, the other grasping the crest of the ilium, draw 
the ilium strongly toward the operator, at the same instant 
pressing hard upon the sacrum. 

Treatment should be given every other day, in a very 
careful manner. One month's treatment correctly given is 
usually sufficient to effect a cure. 

METRORRHAGIA. 

(Uterine hemorrhage, independent of the menses.) 

CAUSE. 

May be caused by obstruction of the general circula- 
tion; diseases of the heart, lungs, or liver; low condition of 
the blood and vessels in a wasting disease; fungous degen- 
eration of the uterine mucous membrane; inversion of the 
uterus; polypus; carcinoma; ulceration; congestion; are- 
olar hyperplasia; hematocele; or retained products of 
conception. 

TREATMENT. 

In the treatment of this disease so much depends upon 
the real cause or combination of causes that the results 
obtained will depend in a large measure upon the good judg- 
ment of the operator, who, after a careful study of his work, 
should select such treatment as the conditions would 
indicate. 



478 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

DYSMENORRHEA. 

(Painful menstruation.) 

TREATMENT. 
See Amenorrhea (page 475). 

NEURALGIC DYSMENORRHEA. 

(Usually associated with other forms, and generally with 

indoor life; anemia; malnutrition, or hysteria.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain in the uterus at times ; at others it is referred to the 
ovaries; shooting in character; usually begins just before 
the flow, and may be relieved by free flow. 

TREATMENT. 
See Amenorrhea (page 475). 

OBSTRUCTIVE DYSMENORRHEA. 

CAUSE. 
May result from flexion or version of the uterus, con- 
traction of the cervical canal, vaginal stricture, polypus in 
the uterus, or obturator hymen. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Oramp-like pain, with expulsion of blood-clots, which 
may relieve the pain until further obstruction. 

TREATMENT. 

See Displacements of the Uterus (page 469). 

CONGESTIVE DYSMENORRHEA. 

CAUSE. 

May result from exi^osure to cold, defective portal 
circulation, plethora, metritis, pelvic peritonitis, ovaritis, 



GYNECOLOGY. 479 

areolar hyperplasia, fibrous tumor, displacement of the 
uterus, or mental disturbances. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Feeling of weight and heat in the back and pelvis just 
before the flow; elevation of temperature; rapid pulse; 
flushed face; headache. Usually relieved by free flow, 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Amenorrhea (page 475). 

2. See Displacements of the Uterus (page 469). 

3. In the treatment of this disease a great deal depends 
upon the judgment of the operator in selecting such treat- 
ment as conditions indicate, always endeavoring to remove 
the cause, and to free and equalize the circulation and nerve- 
wave. 

MEMBRANOUS DYSMENORRHEA. 

(Usually associated with chronic endometritis and poor 

general health.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Colicky pains at the menstrual period, with expulsion 
of organized membranes, either as a whole or in pieces. 

TREATMENT. 

See Amenorrhea (page 475). 

OVARIAN DYSMENORRHEA. 

(Associated with disease of the ovaries.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain and tenderness over the ovary between periods, 
increased by exercise, coitus, and defecation ; symptoms are 
intensified at the menstrual period. 



480 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

See Amenorrliea (page 475). 

2. Place the patient on the back; manipulate the 
ovaries gently, carefully, and in a very thorough manner. 

3. Place the hand lightly over the ovary, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) gently one minute. 

4. Place the patient on the side; with one hand of the 
operator against the sacrum, the other grasping the patient's 
knee, draw the limb slowly but quite strongly backward, 
pressing at the same moment upon the sacrum. This man- 
ipulation stretches the muscles in the immediate region of 
the ovary. Treat the opposite ovary in a similar manner. 

Treatment should be given every other day; an immedi- 
ate change for the better is usually the result of the first 
few treatments. 

LEUCORRHEA, OR THE WHITES (UTERINE CATARRH). 

(Discharges from the vagina of a whitish or 
yellowish mucus.) 

CAUSE. 
May be caused by disordered menstruation, rectal or 
vesical irritation, endometritis, inversion of the uterus, 
granular degeneration, fibroids or polypi, and other genital 
or inflammatory processes. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease may be the result of so many different 
causes that a great deal will depend upon the good judg- 
ment of the operator in properly locating the cause and 
giving suitable treatment. 

This disease usually, however, responds quite readily 
to the following treatment. 

1. See Amenorrhea (page 475). 



GTNECOLOaY. 481 

2. Place the patient on the face; the thumbs of the 
operator upon each side of and close to the spinous process 
of the second lumbar vertebra, an assistant raises the 
limbs slowly, but quite strongly, as high as patient can 
stand, the operator pressing quite hard, at the same instant, 
with the thumbs ; move the thumbs down to the next verte- 
bra, flex the limbs as before; and repeat until the sacrum is 
reached. Place the hand upon the sacrum, pressing very 
hard as the limbs are raised strongly. Great care must 
be exercised not to use sufficient strength to injure the 
patient. 

Treatment should be given every other day, and will 
occupy fifteen or twenty minutes. 

UTERINE MALFORMATION. 
(The principal varieties are : Eudimentary, Bipartitus, Uni- 
cornis, Bicornis, Didelphys, Septus, Infantile, Congeni- 
tal Atrophy-, Complete Absence.) 
Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

ACUTE METRITIS. 
(Inflammation of the parenchyma of the uterus, usually as- 
sociated with endometritis or peritonitis.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Similar to those of endometritis, but more severe; eleva- 
tion of temperature; rapid pulse; pain in pelvis and hypogas- 
trium; uterus enlarged and tender on pressure; nausea; hem- 
orrhage often. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the face; with the thumbs on 
each side of the spine, beginning at the upper cervicals, move 
the muscles upward and outward gently but deep the entire 
length of the spinal column. 



482 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

2. Place the hands upon the same side of the spine; 
beginning at the last dorsal vertebra, move the muscles 
slightly upward, drawing them slowly outward with a strong 
pressure, permitting the muscles to slip under the hand. 
Treat in this manner through the lumbar and sacral regions. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

3. Place the patient on the back; the operator grasp- 
ing the shoulders, as an assistant holds the feet, give gentle 
extension of the spine. 

4. Place the hand lightly o^er the pubes, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) one minute. 

,5. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, the 
fingers almost meeting over the upper cervicals ; tip the head 
backward and press quite strongly with the fingers upon the 
vaso-motor (page 253) four or five minutes. 

Treatment will require fifteen or twenty minutes, and 
should be administered each day until recovery. 

CHRONIC METRITIS, AREOLAR HYPERPLASIA, OR DIF- 
FUSE INTERSTITIAL HYPERTROPHY. 

(Disorder of nutrition affecting the uterus and characterized 
by infiammation, hypergenesis, and hyperesthesia.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Feeling of weight in the pelvis; pain, radiating to the 
back and limbs; irritability of the rectum and bladder; the 
uterus is enlarged, soft, and tender, becoming hard later; 
menorrhagia; abortion; sterility; reflex neuroses. 

TREATMENT. 

This disease, in its early stages, responds readily to 
osteopathic treatment. In its later stages, however, it is not 
treated with marked success. 

1. See Acute Metritis (page 481). 

2. General Treatment (page 306). 



GYNECOLOGY. 483 

ACUTE ENDOMETRITIS. 

(Inflammation of the lining membrane of the uterus.) 

CAUSE. 
May be due to cold from exposure during menstruation; 
vaginitis; excessive yen ery; or supj)ressed menstruation. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Discharge at first watery, later creamy; slight elevation 
of temperature; dull pain in the back and pelvis; cervix 
enlarged, soft, and sensitive. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Metritis (page 481). 

CHRONIC CORPOREAL ENDOMETRITIS. 

(May follow acute attacks or begin as chronic.) 

CAUSE. 
May be due to retention of secundine products after 
parturition. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain in the back and pelvic region; dysmenorrhea; men- 
orrhagia; leucorrhea; abortion; and sterility; cervix usually 
tender and slightly enlarged. 

TREATMENT. 
See Acute Metritis (page 481), applying such additional 
treatment as conditions indicate. 

ENDOCERVICITIS. 

(Chronic inflammation of the lining of the cervix.) 

CAUSE. 
May be due to extension upward of vaginitis, or down- 
ward of corporeal endometritis; uterine flexions; enfeebled 
constitution, etc. 



484 , OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

, SYMPTOMS. 
Pain in the back and loins; leucorrhfea; menorrhagia; 
sterility ; reflex neuroses. 

TREATMENT. 

1. General Treatment (page 306), which should be 
given in a very careful manner. 

2. Give such additional treatment as the conditions 
indicate. 

CESVICAL HYPERTROPHY. 

(Enlargement of cervix.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

^ Sense of weight in the pelvis; leucorrhea; os near the 

vulva, or may protrude. 

TREATMENT. 

In its early stages this disease responds very readily 
and is easily cured by osteopathic treatment. After the 
hypertrophy has become pronounced, it cannot be benefited 
by Osteopathy. 

1. See Amenorrhea (page 475). 

2. Give conjoined manipulations. 

CERVICAL STENOSIS. 
(Constriction of the cervix. May be congenital or acquired.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Dysmenorrhea and sterility. 

TREATMENT. 

See Amenorrhea (page 475). 



GYNECOLOGY. 485 

CERVICAL LACERATION. 

(Tearing of the cervix, due to parturition or abortion.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Feeling of weight in the pelvis; neuralgia; menor- 
rhagia; leucorrhea; sterility; reflex neuroses. 
Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

UTERINE ATROPHY. 
(Wasting of the uterus; natural condition after menopause.) 

CAUSE. 

May be caused by removal of ovaries or tubes. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Amenorrhea; sterility; reflex neuroses. 

TREATMENT. 
May be benefited by General Treatment (page 306), but 
not successfully treated by Osteopathy. 

UTERINE FIBROID TUMOR. 

(Tumor composed of fibro-muscular tissue, situated usually 
in the body of the uterus.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Dysmenorrhea; menorrhagia, followed by metrorrha- 
gia; pain, due to pressure on pelvic nerves, causing neural- 
gia and numbness; constipation; leucorrhea. 

TREATMENT. 
1. Place the patient on the side; move the muscles 
upward and outward gently but very deeply the entire 
length of the spinal column. Treat the opposite side in a 
similar manner. 



486 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

2. Place the patient on the back; flex the limbs 
strongly against the chest, one at a time, giving strong 
abduction of the knee and adduction of the foot as the limb 
is extended. 

3. Place the patient on the face; the operator placing 
the thumbs upon each side of the spine, and close to the 
second lumbar vertebra, an assistant raises the limbs slowly 
but quite strongly as far as the patient can stand ; move the 
thumbs down to the next vertebra and raise the limbs as 
before; and repeat until the sacrum is reached. 

In all cases where constipation is manifest, see Consti- 
pation^ (page 150). 

4. Manipulate the tumor as thoroughly as possible. 

5. Place the hand lightly over the tumor, and give thor- 
ough vibration (pages 36 and 67) two minutes. 

Treatment should be given every other day, and will 
require about twenty minutes. 

UTERINE POLYPUS. 

■ (Tumor covered by the mucous membrane of the uterus, and 
attached to that organ by a stem. May be Fibrous, 
Mucous, Placental, Glandular, or Cellular.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Hemorrhages from the mucous membrane; pain; leu- 
corrhea; sterility; anemia; malaise. 

TREATMENT. 

See Uterine Fibroid Tumor (page 485)- 

UTERINE CARCINOMA. 
(Cancer of the uterus, usuallj^ in the cervix.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain; hemorrhage; offensive discharge; impaired nu- 
trition. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 



GYNECOLOGY. 487 

UTERINE SARCOMA. 

(A growth of modified embryonic connective tissue, usually 

in the body of the uterus.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain; hemorrhage; watery discharge; impaired nutri- 
tion. Most frequent between the ages of forty and fifty. 

TREATMENT. 
See Uterine Fibroid Tumor (page 485). 

SALPINGITIS. 

(Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the Fallopian 

tube, usually arising from extension of endometritis.) 

SYMPTOMS. . 
Dragging and burning pain in the region of the tube, 
especially when walking or standing; dysmenorrhea; per- 
itonitis; tenderness in the lateral vaginal fornix on pressure. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the face; with the hands both 
on the same side of and close to the first lumbar vertebra, 
pressing rather hard, move the muscles slightly upward and 
strongly outward from the spine, permitting the muscles to 
slip beneath the hand.. Treat in this manner through the 
lumbar and sacral Region. Treat the opposite side in a 
similar manner. 

2. Place the left hand upon the center of the sacrum; 
passing the right arm under the limbs, raise the limbs 
slowly but as high as the patient can stand, pressing at the 
same instant upon the sacrum. 

3. Place the patient on the back; the hand of the 
operator resting lightly over the Fallopian tube, give gentle 

-31— 



488 GYNECOLOGY. 

vibration (pages 36 and 67) one minute. Treat the opposite 
tube in a similar manner. 

This treatment should be given each day, and will 
occupy about ten minutes. 

OVARITIS. 

(Inflamniation of the ovary. May be q,cute or chronic.) 

CAUSE. 

Generally due to salpingitis, sepsis during parturition, 
or cold during menstruation. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Acute form usually accompanies salpingitis or perito- 
nitis. Sharp pain in the ovarian region, radiating to the 
back; may be pain in micturition and defecation; reflex 
neuroses. In chronic form symptoms are less marked. 

TREATMENT. 

See Salpingitis (page 487). 

OVARIAN HEMORRHAGE. 

CAUSE. 

Due to obstructed circulation, tumor, cold during men- 
struation, diseases of the heart, lungs, etc. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Ovary enlarged and sensitive to pressure; throbbing 
pain over the ovary; menorrhagia. 

TREATMENT. 

See Salpingitis (page 487). 



GYNECOLOGY. 489 

OVARIAN PROLAPSUS. 
(Falling down of the ovary.) 

CAUSE. 
May be due to congestion of the organ ov displacement 
of the uterus. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Similar to Ovaritis. Ovarian compression; painful 
defecation, and dyspareunia. 

TREATMENT. 

1. In case of Displacement of the Uterus, see page 469. 

2. Careful but thorough manipulation of the ovaries, 
with a view to relaxing the muscles in the immediate region 
and freeing the circulation to the ovaries. 

.3. Place the hand lightly over the ovary, and vibrate 
(pages 36 and 67) one minute. 

4. Place the patient on the side ; one hand of the opera- 
tor against the sacrum, with the other grasp the knee of 
the patient, drawing the limbs slowly but quite strongly 
backward; hold in this position a few seconds. Treat the 
opposite side in a similar manner. 

Treatment should be given every other day, and will 
occupy fifteen or twenty minutes. 

OVARIAN TUMOR. 

(May be Fibromata, Sarcomata, Carcinomata, or Cysts.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Dull pain over iliac fossa, with sense of fullness or throb- 
bing; dragging pains; dysuria; rectal disorders; fatigue 
after exertion; localized peritonitis; no leucorrhea or men- 
orrhagia; uterus not enlarged. 



490 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

trp:atment. 

See Ovarian Prolapsus (page 489). 

PAROVARIAN CYST. 

(Cyst in the broad ligaments of the uterus, developed from 
the parovarium.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Difficult to distinguish from ovarian cyst, except by 
tapping. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Ovarian Prolapsus (page 489). 

2. Manipulate, as thoroughly as possible, the cyst; 
also vibrate over it one minute. 

SIMPLE CATARRHAL VAGINITIS. 

(Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the vagina.) 

CAUSE. 

Due generally to poor health, irritating discharges from 
the cervix, retention of secretions, etc. 

SYMPTOMS. 
In acute form, sense of heat and burning in the vagina; 
pelvic pain; frequent desire to micturate; excoriation of 
the parts above the vulva; in chronic form, itching and 
leucorrhea. 

TREATMENT. 
1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the upper 
cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward slowly, 
gently, but very deep, the entire length of the spinal column, 
being very careful, but thorough, in all regions where any 
tenderness or abnormal temperature is manifest. 



GYXECOLOGY. 49I 

2. Place one hand under the chin, the other under the 
occipital bone, and pull slowly but strongly until the body 
moves. 

3. Give gentle extension of the neck, rotating the head 
from side to side. 

4. Flex the limbs, one at a time, slowly but strongly 
against the abdomen, giring strong abduction of the knee 
and extending with a light jerk. 

5. Pass the finger carefully into the vagina, manipu- 
lating the mucous membrane and muscles gently, but as 
thoroughly as possible. 

6. Place the patient on the face; the operator placing 
one hand upon the center of the sacrum, and passing the 
other beneath the limbs of the patient, raise the limbs 
slowly but strongly, pressing at the same instant quite 
hard upon the sacrum. Care must be exercised not to use 
sufficient strength to injure the patient. 

Treatment will occupy about twenty minutes; an. 
immediate change should be noticed for the better, and a 
continuation of the treatment, given every other day, will 
usually effect a cure. 

GRANULAR VAGINITIS, 
(Inflammation and hypertrophy of the mucous follicles im- 
bedded between the rugge of the vagina.) 

CAUSE. 
Result of pregnancy, or simple or specific vaginitis. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Similar to Simple and Specific Vaginitis, with pruritus 
vulvas, lichenous eruptions about the pubes. 

TREATMENT. 
See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490). 



492 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

SPECIFIC VAGINITIS. 

(Inflammation of the vagina, vulva, and urethra, arising 

from specific contagion.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Similar to simple vaginitis; heat and burning in the 
vagina; heat and sense of weight in the perineum; scalding 
. in micturition, which is frequent; profuse leucorrhea, pur- 
ulent and offensive in character. 

TREATMENT. 

See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490). 

ULCERATIVE VAGINITIS. 

(Present, to some extent, in most women over sixt}^ years 

of age.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Scaling of squamous epithelium in spots, and if spots 
are raw and in apposition, there may be adhesion; usually 
slight leucorrhea, which irritates the vulva, causing pruritus. 

TREATMENT. 

See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490). 

DIPHTHERITIC VAGINITIS. 

(Dependent upon constitutional diphtheria.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Similar to constitutional diphtheria, with membrane 
resembling that usually found in the throat. May appear 
first in the vagina. 

TREATMENT. 

See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490). 



GYNECOLOGY. 493 

ACUTE CATARRHAL VULVITIS. 
(Inflammation of the mucous membrane lining the vulva.) 

CAUSE. 
May be due to uncleanliness, discharges from the cervix 
or vagina, injury or friction from exercise, parasites, foreign 
bodies, excessive venery, or eruptive disorders. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Local pain and burning; parts congested; edematous, 
and covered with a glairy mucus; excoriating discharges;, 
and general malaise. 

TREATMENT. 
See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490). 

CHRONIC CATARRHAL VULVITIS. 
(Found most frequently in scrofulous children.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Intense itching of the parts; discomfort in micturition 
and walking; stained linen. 

TREATMENT. 

See Simple Catarrhal ^^aginitis (page 490). 

PHLEGMONOUS VULVITIS. 

(Suppurative inflammation of the vulva.) 

CAUSE. 
May be due to irritating discharges, boil or abscess, 
traumatism, or eruption of the skin. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain and heat, increased by standing or walking; con 
gestion; induration; swelling; and suppuration. 



494 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 
Simple Oatarhal Yaginitis (page 490). 

DIPHTHERITIC VULVITIS. 

(Dependent upon constitutional diphtheria.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Membrane resembles that usually found in the throat. 
Mav first appear in the vulva. Symptoms same as Con- 
stitutional Diphtheria. 

TREATMENT. 

See Simple Catarrhal Yaginitis (page 490). 

FOLLICULAR VULVITIS. 

(Inflammation of the mucous and sebaceous glands and hair- 
follicles of the vulva.) 

CAUSE. 

May be caused by uncleanliness, vaginitis, pregnancy, 
or eruptions of the skin. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Burning and itching in the vulva, with increased granu- 
lar secretions; urethra may be inflamed at the vulva extrem- 
ity; vaginismus; mucous membrane very red in spots; seba- 
ceous ducts and hair-follicles appear as little, round, red 
papillae, with a drop of pus appearing in their apices. 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Simple Catarrhal Yaginitis (page 490). 

2. Very thorough and careful manipulation of the 
muscles in the immediate region of the vulva. 



GYNECOLOGY. 495 

GANGRENOUS VULVITIS. 

(Inflammation of the vulva, with mortification of the tis- 
sues, dependent upon a depraved condition of the blood, 
and may develop in puerperal fever, scarlatina, measles, 
or continued fever.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
A patch or vesicle of grayish, reddish, or blackish hue, 
which ulcerates and becomes depressed in swollen and indu- 
rated tissues — red in color; gangrene at once sets in; vital 
forces break down. 

TREATMENT. 

See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490). 

If taken in very early stage, relief is often given. If 
not taken, however, in its earliest stages, this disease is not 
treated osteopathically with any marked success. 

CYST OF VULVO-VAGINAL GLAND. 
(May be multiple.) 

CAUSE. 

Formed by distension of the gland, caused by occlusion 
of the duct, probably due to inflammation. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Manipula.te the muscles in the immediate region of 
the gland, gently but very thoroughly, with a view of remov- 
ing the occlusion of the duct. 

2. Knead and manipulate the cyst in a careful but 
thorough manner. 

ABSCESS OF THE VULVO-VAGINAL GLAND. 
CAUSE. 
May be produced by the same cause as vulvitis. 



496 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain, heat, redness, especially near the orifice of the 
gland; tender on pressure; at first hard, later fluctuating. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
first lumbar vertebra, move the muscles upward and out- 
ward, to the lower extremity of the sacrum, gently but very 
deep. Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Place the patient on the face; the operator placing 
one hand upon the center of the sacrum, passing the dis- 
engaged arm beneath the limbs, raise the limbs slowly but 
rather strongly, pressing hard at the same instant upon the 
sacrum. Great care must be exercised not to use sufficient 
strength to injure the patient. 

3. Pass the finger into the vagina, manipulating the 
parts in such a manner as to free the ducts and circulation to 
the gland. Also manipulate the abscess gently, but as thor- 
oughly as possible. 

Treatment should be given every other day, and will 
occupy about fifteen minutes. 

VULVAR ECZEMA. 
(More common in women near the menopause.) 

CAUSE. 

Generally caused by irritating discharges from the 
cervix or vagina. 

SYMPTOMS. 

In acute form, parts become red and edematous; vesi- 
cles appear, break, and discharge a tenacious fluid; severe 
burning and itching. In chronic form, parts become thick- 
ened and scaly. 



GYNECOLOGY. 497 

TREATMENT. 

See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490). 

VULVAR ERYSIPELAS. 
(Erysipelas of the yiilya is accompanied by grayer symp- 
toms than when appearing in other parts of the body.) 

TREATMENT. 

See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490). 

VULVAR ERYTHEMA. 
(Superficial redness of the skin about the yulya.) 

CAUSE. 
Caused by uncleanliness, irritating discharges, exer- 
cise, etc. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Parts become sensitive, red, excoriated, and painful. 

TREATMENT. 

If due to irritating discharges, see Simple Catarrhal 
Vaginitis (page 490). 

If caused by uncleanliness, the treatment would be 
apparent. 

VULVAR HYPERESTHESIA. 

(Excessiye sensibility of the mucous membrane of the vulya.) 

CAUSE. 

May be due to menopause, hysteria, etc. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Hyperesthesia about the labia minora and yestibule ; no 
inflammation or pruritus. 



498 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

If due to menopause, see Menopause (page 505). 
If due to liysteria, see Hysteria 

If due to other causes, the operator should endeavor to 
apply such treatment as conditions indicate. 

PRURITUS VULVAE. 

(Irritation of the nerves supplying the vulva, with 

intense itching.) 

CAUSE. 

Due to irritating discharges, parasites, eruptions, etc. 

SYMPTOMS.. 
Intense itching at intervals, later constant; sometimes 
leads to nervous depression. 

TREATMENT. 

See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490), 

VAGINISMUS. 

(Excessive sensibility of the hymen and vulva outlet, with 

sj)asmodic contraction of the sphincter vaginae muscle.) 

CAUSE. 
Due to dense hymen, narrow vagina, or disturbance of 
sexual functions. 

Not treated succesfully by Osteopathy. 

ACUTE PELVIC PERITONITIS. 

(Inflammation of the peritoneum covering the female 
pelvic viscera.) 

CAUSE. 

May be due to inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, or 
tubes, parturition, or abortion. 



GYNECOLOGY. 499 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain and tenderness in the lower abdomen ; patient lies 
on back, with knees elevated; pulse small and rapid; tem- 
perature may be 104° to 105°; nausea and vomiting; tym- 
panites; constipation; often metrorrhagia. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the first 
lumbar vertebra, move the muscles upward and outward, 
gently but deeply, to the lower part of the sacrum. Treat 
the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Flex the limbs slowly but quite strongly against 
the chest; hold a few seconds in this position. 

3. Place one hand against the sacrum, with the other 
draw the limb of the patient slowly backward while press- 
ing hard on the sacrum. Treat the opposite side in a sim- 
ilar manner. 

4. The patient lying on the back; the operator places 
his hand lightly over the pubes, vibrating (pages 36 and 67) 
gently two minutes. 

The above treatment starts the circulation through the 
pelvic region, thereby reducing tTie inflammation. 

5. Place the hands upon the sides of the neck, the 
fingers almost meeting over the upper cervicals; tip the head 
backward, pressing rather hard with the fingers at the same 
instant; hold in this position three or four minutes. See 
Vaso-motor fpage 253). 

This treatment will occupy about fifteen minutes, and 
should be given each day until recovery. 

CHRONIC PELVIC PERITONITIS. 

(May follow acute attacks, or may not.) 

SYMPTOMS. 
Dull pain in the pelvis; usually vesical and rectal irri- 
tation; leucorrhea and monorrhagia. 



500 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

TEEATMENT. 

See Acute Pelvic Peritonitis (page 499). 
Treatment should be given every other day. 

PELVIC CELLULITIS. 
(Inflammation of cellular tissue of the pelvic peritoneum.) 

CAUSE. 
Due to parturition, abortion, or operation. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Bigor; elevation of temperature to 103° to 105°; pulse 
full and rapid; occasional nausea; no vomiting; may be 
formation of pus above pubes. 

TREATMENT. 

See Acute Pelvic Peritonitis (page 199). 

VESICO-VAGINAL FISTULA. 
(Communication between the bladder and vagina.) 

CAUSE. 
Usually caused by tedious labor. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Urinous odor about person; involuntary escape of 
urine; irritation; and excoriation about the vulva. 
No cure in Osteopathy. 

RECTO-VAGINAL FISTULA. 
(Communication between the rectum and vagina.) 

CAUSE. 
Usually caused by long-continued pressure during labor. 



GYNECOLOGY. 501 

SYMPTOMS. 
Discharge of offensive gas or fecal matter by the 
vagina. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

COCCYGODYNIA. 

{Painful affection of the muscles and nerves of the coccyx. 
Most frequently occurs after child-birth.) 
May be caused by a fall, kick, or blow, etc. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain in the coccygeal region, increased by motion or 
pressure on the coccyx, and on rising after sitting. 

TREATMENT. 
This disease is usually the result of dislocation of the 
coccyx, and can be quickly, easily, and permanently cured 
by reduction of the dislocation. See Dislocation of the 
Coccyx (page 447). 

URETHRAL CARUNCLE. 

(Small red fleshy growth at the mouth of the urethra.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Frequent and painful micturition; dysuria increases; 
pain on walking, pressure, or friction; bleeds easily; may be 
single or multiple. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the first 
lumbar vertebra, move the muscles upward and outward, 
gently but deep, through the lumbar and sacral regions. 
Treat the opposite side in a similar manner. 

2. Flex the limbs strongly against the chest; hold in 



502 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

this position a few seconds, giving strong abduction to the 
knee and adduction to the foot as the limb is extended. 

3. Manipulate the muscles in the immediate region of 
the growth carefully but very deeply, with a view of freeing 
the venous circulation in the immediate region, an obstruc- 
tion of which is the true cause of this trouble. 

4. Manipulate the caruncle very gently but as thor- 
oughly as possible. 

Treatment will occupy about ten minutes, and should 
be given every third day. 

PROLAPSUS TJRETHRAE. 

(Prolapsus of the mucous membrane of the urethra at the 
meatus urinarius.) 

CAUSE. 

May be due to frequent child-bearing or vesical and 
rectal Irritation. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Protrusion at first pink in color, later red, and may 
become excoriated and sensitive; frequent micturition, 
becoming painful, and tenesmus. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Careful but very thorough General Treatment 
(page 306) to stimulate and equalize the circulation and 
nerve-wave. 

2. If due to rectal or vesical irritation, such additional 
treatment should be applied as conditions indicate. 



GYNECOLOGY. 503 

PROLAPSUS VAGINAE. 

(Falling down of the vaginal walls toward the vulva. Has 
been known to occur in virgins, and may be associated 
with vaginal hernia and prolapsus uteri.) 

CAUSE. 

May be due to frequent parturition, atrophy of the walls, 
excessive weight, violent effort, vaginitis, etc 

SYMPTOMS. 
Sense of discomfort in the vagina, with tendency to 
bearing down, as if to expel something; feeling of heat, full- 
ness, and throbbing at the vulva; presence of a tumor 
between the labia, which touch will show to contain no 
liquid. 

TKEATMENT. 

1. See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490). 

2. See Displacements of the Uterus (page 469). 

VAGINAL HERNIA. 

(May be Vesico-vaginal, Recto-vaginal, Entero-vaginal.) 

Cystocele consists of descent of the bladder toward the 
vulva, so as to impinge upon the vaginal canal. 

Rectocele occurs similar to cystocele, the posterior wall 
of the vagina ceasing to give support to the anterior wall of 
the rectum. 

Enterocele consists in descent of the small intestine into 
the pelvis, encroaching upon the vaginal canal. 

No cure in Osteopathy. 

ATRESIA VAGINAE. 

(Occlusion of the vagina.) 
CAUSE. 
Generally congenital from maldevelopment. 

-32- 



504 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Accumulation of menstrual blood; no blood appearing 
at menstrual period ; may . produce rupture of hymen or 
vagina, and cause septicemia. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

PUDENDAL HERNIA. 

(Protrusion of the intestines, omentum, ovary, or bladder 
through the inguinal canal into the labia majora.) 

CAUSE. 

Caused by a blow, fall, coughing, or violent exertion. 

SYMPTOMS. 

If intestine gives impulse on coughing; if ovary gives 
ovarian sensation on pressure; also size and tenderness in- 
creased during menstruation. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

PUDENDAL HEMATOCELE. 
(Effusion of blood into the tissues of the vulvo-vaginal 
region, usually into one labium or areolar tissue sur- 
rounding the vagina.) 

CAUSE. 

May be caused by muscular efforts, blows, rupturing 
the labia, or by punctures. 

SYMPTOMS. 
Pain and throbbing; swelling first soft, later hard; if 
effusion reaches urethra, there is obstruction ro mucturition. 

TREATMENT. 
See Simple Catarrhal Vaginitis (page 490), applying the 
treatment with a view of equalizing the circulation to the 



GTNECOLOGY. 505 

parts involved, manipulating the vagina in such a manner as 
to stretch the muscles and free the circulation, thereby 
checking the effusion of blood. 

PUDENDAL HEMORRHAGE. 
(Hemorrhage from the vulva.) 

CAUSE. 
Same as Pudendal Hematocele. 

TREATMENT. 

See Pudendal Hematocele (page 504). 

PELVIC HEMATOCELE. 
(Effusion of blood into cavity of the pelvic peritoneum.) 

CAUSE. 
May be due to ruptured extra-uterine fetation sac or 
tubal abortion. 

SYMPTOMS. 

Sudden sharp pain; symptoms of shock and hemor- 
rhage; face pallid; pulse rapid and feeble; temperature sub- 
normal; cold perspiration; may be nausea and vomiting; 
symptoms of peritonitis; tumor bulging down in posterior 
fornix of vagina. 

Not treated successfully by Osteopathy. 

MENOPAUSE, OR "CHANGE OF LIFE." 
(Final cessation of the menses.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

While the change is in progress there is commonly more 
or less functional disturbance of the general health, the nerv- 
ous system especially manifestipg various changes, such as 



506 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

vertigo, syncope, headache, flushes of heat, urinary troubles, 
pains in the back extending down the thighs with creeping 
sensations, heat in the lower part of the abdomen, occa- 
sional swelling of the lower extremities, itching of the pri- 
vate parts, mental irritability and restlessness, culminating 
seriously sometimes, especially in patients of a decided nerv- 
ous character. Sometimes menstruation ceases abruptly. 
The monthly period may be arrested by cold, fright, or some 
illness; earlier in life the suppression would have been fol- 
lowed by a return of menstruation after removal of the 
cause, but now Nature adopts this opportunity to terminate 
the function. Gradual termination is, however, more fre- 
quent and is attended with less disturbance of health. In 
gradual extinction one period is missed and then there is a 
return, a longer time elapses and there is an excessive flow; 
this continues for a time, the returns being fewer and farther 
apart, until they cease altogether. 

At this critical period there is not infrequently an 
enlargement of the abdomen, which, though it may occur ear- 
lier in life, is due to causes peculiar to this. 

TREATMENT. 

A General Treatment every other day will equalize the 
circulation and give wonderful relief (page 306). 



OBSTETRICS. 507 



Obstetrics —Midwifery. 



MALE GENERATIVE ORGANS. 

The male generative organs consist of the Prostate 
Gland, Cowper's Glands, the Penis, the Testes, and the Ves- 
icuhe Seminales. 

Prostate Gland. — The Prostate Gland is a muscular, 
glandular body, and is placed around the commencement of 
the urethra and immediately in front of the neck of the blad- 
der. It is situated in the pelvic cavity behind and below the 
symphysis pubis, posterior to the deep perineal fascia, rest- 
ing upon the rectum. When enlarged, it may be distinctly 
felt through the rectum. It resembles, in size and shape, a 
horse-chestnut. It measures about H by 1 inch by f inch, 
and weighs about three-fourths of an ounce. 

It is perforated by the urethra and ejaculatory ducts. 
The ejaculatory ducts pass forward obliquely between the 
middle and each lateral lobe of the i)rostate, and open into 
the prostatic portion of the urethra. 

The arteries which supply the prostate are derived from 
the internal pudic, vesical, and hemorrhoidal. 

The veins form a plexus around the sides and base of the 
prostate ; receiving in front the dorsal vein of the penis, and 
terminating in the internal iliac vein. 

The nerves are derived from the pelvic plexus. 

Cowper's Glands. — Cowper's glands are situated between 
two layers of the deep perineal fascia, one on each side of the 
membranous portion of the urethra, close above the bulb. 



508 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

They are about the size of peas, and gradually diminish as 
age advances. They consist of several lobules, held together 
by a fibrous investment. Their excretory ducts are nearly 
an inch in length, and pass obliquely forward beneath the 
mucous membrane, opening by a minute orifice on the floor of 
the bulbous portion of the urethra. 

Penis. — The penis is composed of a mass of erectile tissue 
arranged in three compartments of cylindrical shape, each 
surrounded by a fibrous sheath, forming numerous bands 
which divide the compartments into a number of spaces. 

The compartments are called the Corpora Cavernosa, 
and the^Corpus Spongiosum. 

The penis is the organ of copulation, consisting of a root, 
body, and extremity, or glans penis. 

The corpora cavernosa consist of two fibrous cylindrical 
tubes placed side by side and intimately connected along the 
median line for their anterior three-fourths, forming the chief 
part of the body of the penis. A median groove on the upper 
surface contains the dorsal vein of the penis, while the 
groove on the under surface receives the corpus spongiosum. 
The whole of the structure of the corpora cavernosa con- 
tained within the fibrous sheath consists of a sponge-like 
tissue of areolar spaces freely communicating with each 
other and filled with venous blood. 

The arteries, on entering the cavernous structure, divide 
into branches, which are supported and enclosed by the 
trabecul?e. Some of these terminate in a capillary network, 
the branches opening directly into the cavernous spaces. 
They are bound down in spaces by fine fibrous processes, and 
are more abundant in the back part of the corpora cavernosa. 

The blood is returned by a series of vessels, some of 
which emerge from the base of the glans penis, and converge 
on the dorsum, to form the dorsal vein. Others pass out on 



OBSTETRICS. 509 

the upper surface, and join the dorsal vein. The greater 
number pass out at the root of the penis and join the 
prostatic plexus. 

The corpus spongiosum is an erectile tube lying in the 
inferior groove between the two corpora cavernosa, enclosing 
the urethra. It forms a rounded enlargement, the bulb, and 
terminates anteriorly in another expansion, the glans penis, 
which overlaps the anterior rounded extremity of the cor- 
pora cavernosa. 

The erectile tissue consists of an intricate venous plexus, 
supplied by afferent arteries and emptied by efferent veins. 

The nerves are derived from the internal pudic nerve and 
the pelvic plexus. 

The glans penis is of the form of an obtuse comb, flat- 
tened from above downward; at its summit is a vertical 
fissure, the meatus urinarius. The base of the gland forms a 
rounded projecting border, and behind the corona is a deep 
constriction, the cervix. Upon both of these parts numerous 
small glands are found, which secrete a sebaceous matter of 
peculiar odor. 

Testes. — The testes, or testicles, are glandular organs, sus- 
pended obliquely in the scrotum by the spermatic cords. 
They secrete a seminal fluid. The testicles measure each 
about an inch in diameter, and weigh three-fourths to one 
ounce. They descend before birth to the inguinal canal, 
along which they pass with the spermatic cord, emerging at 
the external abdominal ring, and descending into the 
scrotum. 

The scrotum is a cutaneous pouch which contains the 
testes and part of the spermatic cord. Its external aspect 
varies under different circumstances: Under the influence 
of warmth and in old and debilitated persons it becomes 
elongated and flaccid, but under the influence of cold and in 



510 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the young and robust it is short, corrugated, and closely 
applied to the testes. 

The spermatic cord is composed of arteries, veins, lym- 
phatics, nerves, the excretory ducts of the testicle, and a thin 
fibrous cord. These structures are connected together by 
an areolar tissue, and invested by fascia brought down in the 
descent of the testicle. 

The arteries of the cord are the spermatic from the aorta, 
the artery of the vas deferens from the superior vesical, and 
the cremasteric from the deep epigastric. 

The nerves are the spermatic plexus from the sympa- 
thetic; and filaments from the pelvic plexus. 

Vesiculae Seminales. — The seminal vesicles are two lobu- 
lated membranous pouches between the rectum and base of 
the bladder, serving as reservoirs for the semen, also secret- 
ing a fluid to be added to the secretion of the testicles. They 
measure about two and one-half inches in length, about five 
lines in breadth, and two or three lines in thickness. They 
vary in size in different individuals and also in the same 
individual on the two sides. Their upper surface is in contact 
with the base of the bladder, extending from near the ter- 
mination of the ureters to the base of the prostate gland. 
Their under surface rests upon the rectum, from which they 
are separated by the recto-vesical fascia. 

The ejaculatory ducts, one on each side, are formed by the 
junction of the ducts of the vesiculse seminales with the vasa 
deferentia. Each duct is about three-fourths of an inch in 
length, commencing at the base of the prostate and running 
forward and downward between the middle and lateral lobes 
and along the sides of the sinus pocularis. 



0B8TETRWS. 511 

FEMALE GENERATIVE ORGANS. 

The female generative organs are divided into the exter- 
nal and internal. 

External. — The external are divided into the Mons Ven- 
eris, the Labia Majora and Minora, the Clitoris, the Meatus 
Urinarius, and the Orifice of the Vagina. The term "vulva," 
as generally applied,- includes all these parts. 

Mons Veneris. — The mons veneris is a round eminence in 
front of the pubic symphysis, formed by a collection of fatty 
tissue beneath the integument. 

Labia Majora. — The labia majora are two prominent 
longitudinal cutaneous folds extending downward from the 
mons veneris to the anterior boundary of the perineum. 

Labia Minora. — The labia minora, or nymphae, are two 
folds of mucous membrane, hidden posteriorly in the labia 
majora, but anteriorly they embrace the clitoris, forming its 
prepuce. 

Clitoris. — ^The clitoris is an erectile structure analogous 
to the corpora cavernosa of the penis. It is situated beneath 
the anterior commissure, partially hidden between the ante- 
rior extremities of the labia minora. The body is short, con- 
cealed beneath the labia. The free extremity, or glans cli- 
toridis, is a small rounded tubercle, consisting of spongy 
erectile tissue, and highly sensitive. It might be called a 
diminutive penis, like it, being provided with a body, two 
crura, a glans, prepuce, a suspensory ligament, and with 
two small muscles, the erectoris clitoridis, inserted into the 
crura. 

The clitoris consists of two corpora cavernosa, com- 
posed of erectile tissue invested by a layer of dense fibrous 
membrane, uniting along their adjacent surfaces by means of 
an incomplete fibrous pectiniform septum. 



512 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

The triangular smooth surface between the entrance of 
the vagina and the clitoris is the vestibule. 

Meatus ¥rinarius. — The meatus urinarius is the orifice of 
the urethra, and is situated near the margin of the vagina, 
about an inch below the clitoris, at the back part of the 
vestibule. 

Orifice of the Vagina. — The orifice of the vagina is below 
the meatus urinarius, surrounded by the sphincter vaginae 
muscle, and, as a rule, partly closed in the virgin by the 
hymen. 

Other parts comprised in the vulva are the Hymen, 
Glands of Bartholin, and the Bulbi Vestibuli. 

The hymen is a membranous fold which closes, to a 
greater or less extent, the opening of the vagina. It varies 
much in shape. Its commonest form is that of a ring broad- 
est posteriorly. It is sometimes represented by a semilunar 
fold with its concave margin turned toward the pubes. It 
may persist after copulation, so that its presence cannot be 
depended upon as a sure test of virginity. 

The glands of Bartholin, one on each side of the vaginal 
orifice, are analogous to Cowper's glands in the male, present 
a slightly oblong body about the size of a horse-bean, are of 
a reddish-yellow color, and the duct of each gland opens on 
the inner side of the labia minora external to the hymen. 

The bulbi vestibuli are two large oblong masses, about an 
inch long, consisting of a venous plexus invested by fibrous 
membrane, and extend along the sides of the vestibule, from 
the clitoris. They are considered analogous to the bulb of 
the corpus spongiosum in the male. 

Internal. — The internal organs of generation are the 
Vagina, the Uterus and its appendages: the Fallopian Tubes, 
the Ovaries and their Ligaments, and the Round Ligaments. 

Vagina. — The vagina is situated in the cavity of the pel- 



OBSTETRICS. 513 

vis, in front of the rectum, behind the bladder, and extends 
from the vulva to the uterus. Is is curved upward and back- 
ward, at first, in the line of the outlet, and afterward in that 
of the axis of the cavity of the pelvis. Its walls are usually 
in contact. Its length is about two and one-half inches along 
its anterior wall, and three and one-half inches along its 
posterior wall. 

The vagina consists of an internal mucous lining, of a 
muscular coat, and between the two a layer of erectile tissue. 

Uterus. — The uterus is a hollow, pear-shaped, muscular 
organ, about three inches long, two inches broad, and one 
inch thick, flattened from before backward, placed base up- 
ward, and forming an angle with the vagina, which partially 
receives its cervix. It is the organ of gestation, receiving the 
fecundated ovum in its cavity, supporting and retaining it 
during the development of the fetus, and becoming the prin- 
cipal agent in its expulsion at the time of parturition. 

Fallopian Tubes. — The Fallopian tubes, or oviducts, are 
really the ducts of the ovaries. They consist of a serous, 
muscular (an external longitudinal and an internal circu- 
lar) layer of non-striped muscle, and a mucous layer, lined by 
a single layer of ciliated columnar epithelium, but no glands. 

They convey the ova from the ovaries to the cavity of the 
uterus. They are two in number, one on each side, situated 
in the upper margin of the broad ligament, extending from 
each superior angle of the uterus to the sides of the pelvis; 
each tube is about four inches in length. The general direc- 
tion of the Fallopian tubes is outward, backward, and down- 
ward. The uterine opening is minute, and will only admit a 
fine bristle; the abdominal opening is comparatively much 
larger. 

Ovaries. — The ovaries are oval-shaped bodies, flattened 



514 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

from above downward, situated one on each side of the 
uterus in the posterior part of the broad ligament, behind 
and below the Fallopian tubes. Each ovary is connected by 
its anterior straight margin to the broad ligament, by its 
inner extremity to the uterus by a proper ligament, the liga- 
ment of the ovary, and by its outer end to the fimbriated 
extremity of the Fallopian tube. The ovaries are about an 
inch and a half in length, three-quarters of an inch in width, 
and about a third of an inch in thickness. 

The ovaries are analogo^us to the testes in the male. 
Their exact position has been the subject of considerable 
difference of opinion, and writers differ much as to what is to 
be regarded as their normal position. They appear to be 
differently placed in different individuals. 

Kolliker asserts that the ovary is placed obliquely in the 
pelvis, its long axis lying parallel to the external iliac vessels, 
with its surface directed inward and outward and its convex 
free border upward. He has made some important observa- 
tions on the subject and his views are largely accepted. He 
teaches that the uterus rarely lies symmetrically in the 
middle of the pelvic cavit}^, but is generally inclined to one 
side or the other, most frequently to the left. The position of 
the two ovaries varies according to the inclination of the 
uterus. In whichever position tlie ovary is placed, the Fal- 
lopian tube forms a loop around it, the uterine half ascending 
obliquely over it, and the outer half, including the dilated 
extremity, descending and bulging freely behind it. 

Ligaments of the Ovaries. — The ligament of the ovary is a 
round fibrous cord extending from the superior angles of the 
uterus to the ovary at its lower extremity. 

Round Ligaments. — The round ligaments are two cords, 
composed of muscular, fibrous, and areolar tissue, nerves. 



OBSTETRICS. 515 

and blood-YOSsels, extending from the fundus uteri to the 
labia majora. They are said to be analogous to the peri- 
toneal pouch in the male. 

The Graafian follicles, or ovisacs, contain the ova. Im- 
mediately beneath the superficial covering is ■ a layer of 
stroma in which are a large number of minute vesicles of 
uniform size; these are the Griaafian vesicles or follicles in 
their earliest condition, and the layer where they have been 
found has been termed the cortical layer; they are especially 
numerous in the ovary of the young child. After puberty 
and during the whole of the child-bearing period large and 
juature, or almost mature, Graafian vesicles are also found in 
the cortical layer in small numbers and also ''corpora lutea," 
the remains of vesicles which have burst and are undergoing 
atrophy and absorption. Benea.th this superficial stratum 
other large and more mature Graafian vesicles are found 
imbedded in the ovarian stroma. These increase in size as 
they recede from the surface toward a highly vascular stroma 
in the center of the organ, termed the medullary substance; 
This stroma forms the tissue of the hilum by which the ovary 
is attached, and through which the blood-vessels enter. It 
does not contain any Graafian vesicles. 

The larger Graafian follicles consist of an external fibro- 
vascular coat connected with the surrounding stroma of the 
ovary by a network of blood-vessels; and an internal coat, 
which is lined by a layer of nucleated cells, called the 
memhrana granulosa. The fluid contained in the interior of 
the vesicles is transparent and albuminous. In it is sus- 
pended the ovum. In that part of the mature Graafian ves- 
icle which is nearest the surface of the ovary the cells of the 
membrana granulosa are collected into a mass which projects 
into the cavity of the vesicle. This is termed the discus 
proligerus, and in this the ovum is imbedded. 



516 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

The development and maturation of the Graafian vesi- 
cles and ova continue uninterruptedly from puberty to the 
end of the fruitful period of woman's life, while their forma- 
tion commences before birth. Before puberty the ovaries are 
small, and the Graafian vesicles contained in them are dis- 
posed in a comparatively thin layer in the cortical substance. 
At puberty the ovaries enlarge, are more vascular, the 
Graafian vesicles are developed in greater abundance, and 
their ova are capable of fecundation. 

The discharge of the ovum is produced by the bursting of 
the Graafian vesicles after having gradually approached the 
surface of the ovary. The ovum and fluid contents are liber- 
ated and escape on the exterior of the ovary, passing thence 
into the Fallopian tube. 

Puberty. — This terra "puberty" is applied to the period at 
which a human being becomes capable of procreating, which 
occurs from the thirteenth to the fifteenth year in the female, 
and the fourteenth to the sixteenth in the male. In warm 
climates, puberty often occurs in girls even at eight years ot 
age. Toward the fortieth or fiftieth year, the procreative 
faculty ceases in the female, with the cessation of the menses ; 
this constitutes the menopause, whilst in man the formation 
of seminal fiuid has been observed up to old age. From the 
period of puberty onward the sexual appetite occurs, and the 
ripe ova are discharged from the ovary. 

Menstruation. — At regular intervals of time, twenty- 
eight days in the adult female, there is a rupture of one or 
more ripe Graafian follicles, and at the same time there is 
a discharge of blood from the external genitals. This process 
is known as "menstruation," "menses," or "periods." Most 
women menstruate during the first quarter of the moon, and 
only a few at full and new moon. 



OBSTETRICS. 517 

At the onset of menstruation there is usually an 
increased feeling of congestion in the internal generative 
organs, pain in the back and loins, tension in the region of 
the uterus and ovaries, which are sensitive to pressure, 
fatigue in the limbs, alternate feeling of heat and cold, and 
a slight increase in the temperature of the skin. The process 
of digestion may be retarded, and there may be variations in 
the evacuation of the feces and urine. The discharge is at 
first slimy, afterwards becoming bloody, and lasting three to 
four days. After cessation of the discharge of blood, there 
is a small quantity of mucus given off. 

The uterine mucous membrane is the chief source^ of the 
blood. The ciliated epithelium of the swollen, congested, 
and folded, soft, thick mucous membrane is shed. The 
orifices of the numerous mucous glands of the mucous mem- 
brane are distinct, the glands enlarge, and the cells undergo 
fatty degeneration, as do also the tissue and the blood- 
vessels lying between the glands. This degeneration and 
excretion of the degenerated tissue occurs only in the super- 
ficial layers of the mucosa, whose blood-vessels, when torn, 
yield the blood. The deeper layers remain intact, and from 
them, after menstruation is over, the new mucous membrane 
is formed. 

Erection. — Erection is due to the overfilling of the penis 
with blood, whereby the! volume of the organ is increased four 
or five times, while, at the same time, there is also a higher 
temperature, increased blood-pressure, with at first a: pulsa- 
tile movement, increased consistence, and erection of the 
organ. 

The arteries are controlled by the nervi erigentes, which 
arise chiefly from the second sacral nerves. 

As these nerves contain vaso-dilator fibers, they can be 
excited reflexly from the sensory nerves of the penis, the 



518 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

transference center being in the center for erection in the 
spinal cord. This reflex can also be discharged by sen- 
sory impressions produced by voluntary movements of the 
genitals; a tendency to induce erection is followed by the 
thought of sexual impulses. 

The center for erection in the spinal cord is, however, 
controlled by the dominating vaso-dilator center in the 
medulla oblongata, and the two centers are connected by 
fibers within the cord. Stimulation of the upper part of the 
cord, as by asphyxiated blood, may also be followed by erec- 
tion. The seminal fluid is frequently found discharged in 
persons who have been hanged. 

The activity of the cerebrum has a decided influence on 
the genital vaso-dilator nerves; as anger or shame is followed 
by dilatation of the blood-vessels of the head, owing to stimu- 
lation of the vaso-dilator fibers, so when the attention is 
directed to the sexual centers there is an action upon the 
nervi erigentes. 

When the impulse to erection is obtained by the in- 
creased supply of arterial blood, the ''full completion" of 
the act is brougbt about by the activity of the following 
transA'ersely striped muscles: the ischio-cavernosus, the 
deep transversus perinei, and the bulbo-cavernosus. The 
contraction of these muscles is partially under control of the 
will, whereby the erection may be increased; normally, how- 
ever, their contraction is excited refexly by stimulation of 
the sensory nerves of the penis. 

The imperfect erection which occurs in the female is con- 
fined to the corpora cavernosa clitoridis and the bulbi vesti- 
buli. During erection, the passage from the urethra to the 
bladder is closed by the swelling of the caput gallinaginis, 
and partly by the action of the sphincter urethrse, which is 
connected with the deep transverus perinei. 



OBSTETRICS. 519 

Emission and Reception of the Semen. — In connection 
with the emission of the seminal fluid there are two different 
factors: its passage from the testicle to the vesiculse semi- 
nales, and the act of emission itself. The first is caused by 
the newlv secreted fluid forcing on that in front of it, by the 
action of the ciliated epithelium and by the peristaltic 
movements of the smooth muscular fibers of the vas defer- 
ens. Emissions require strong peristaltic contractions of 
the vasa deferentia and the vesicular seminales, which are 
brought about by the reflex stimulation of the emission cen- 
ter in the spinal cord. As soon as the fluid reaches the 
urethra, there is a rhythmical contraction of the bulbo-caver- 
nosus muscle, whereby the fluid is forcibly ejected from the 
urethra. The vasa deferentia and vesiculae do not always 
eject their contents into the urethra simultaneously. With 
moderate excitement the contents of only one may be dis- 
charged. In the female, under normal circumstances, at the 
height of sexual excitement, there is a reflex movement cor- 
responding to emission. 

Erection of the Uterus. — The uterus is. erected by the 
powerful contraction of its muscular fibers and round liga- 
ments, while at the same time it descends toward the vagina. 
Its cavity is more and more diminished, and its mucous con- 
tents are forced out. When the uterus relaxes, after the 
stage of excitement, it aspirates into its cavity the seminal 
fluid injected into the vagina, but the suction of the greatly 
excited uterus is not necessary for the reception of the 
semen. The spermatozoa may wriggle by their own move- 
ments from the vagina into the orifice of the uterus. 

Fertilization of the Ovum. — The ovum is fertilized by one 
speimatozoon passing into it. The cases of pregnancy where, 
for some cause (partial closure of the vagina or vulva), the 
penis has not passed into the vagina during coition, prove 

-33- 



520 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

that the spermatozoa can traverse the whole length of the 
vagina and pass into the uterus. 

The sticky surface of the ovum enables the spermato- 
zoon to adhere to it. At the place where the head of the 
spermatozoon touches the yelk, there is formed opposite to 
it an elevation of the yelk. After the si)ermatozoon has 
penetrated into the yelk, the other spermatozoa are pre- 
vented from entering the ovum by the formation of a mem- 
brane on the surface of the yelk. 

Fertilization occurs either in the ovary or in the Fal- 
lopian tube. 

THE FETUS. 

Nourishment. — The impregnated ovum, during its pas- 
sage through the oviduct, receives nourishment, first, from 
the discus proligerus; afterward, by a liquid derived from 
the mucous membrane of the oviduct. It receives nourish- 
ment, after reaching the uterus, from the villi of the chorion 
and a liquid secretion from the uterine mucous membrane; 
later, from the umbilical vesicle, the nutrient materials of 
Avhieh are carried to the embryo, through the omphalo- 
mesenteric veins; finally, the placenta is the chief source of 
nourishment. 

Circulation. — The heart, at this period of embryonic life, 
consists of a single cavity. The first aortic arches are given 
off from its upper end; at its lower, the omphalo-mesenteric 
veins. The blood passes into the body of the embryo, pro- 
pelled by the heart through the aortic arches, and is then dis- 
tributed to the vascular area of the umbilical vesicle by the 
omphalo-mesenteric arteries. It is returned to the heart 
from the venous sinuses by the omphalo-mesenteric veins. 
The blood is carried to the fetus from the placenta, rich 
with nutritive material and oxygen, by the umbilical vein. 



OBSTETRICS. 521 

It is divided into two currents, after entering at the umbil- 
icus, the larger current passing into the inferior vena 
cava, while the smaller one enters the liver, and is carried to 
the vena cava by the hepatic veins. The blood in the infe- 
rior vena cava, composed chiefly of pure blood from the 
placenta, goes to the right auricle, but the Eustachian valve 
turns the current through the foramen ovale into the left 
auricle, from which it passes into the left ventricle. The 
blood from the head and upper extremities passes into the 
right auricle through the superior vena cava, from which it 
enters the right ventricle. The blood from the left ventricle 
supplies the head and upper extremities; the heart, contract- 
ing, forces the blood from the left ventricle into the aorta, 
and from the right ventricle into the pulmonary artery. 
That which enters the pulmonary artery from the right ven- 
tricle passes into the aorta through the ductus arteriosus, 
somewhat below the point at w^hich the arteries of the head 
and upper extremities are given off. The impure blood from 
the right ventricle, after entering the aorta, supplies the 
trunk, lower extremities, and placenta; passing from the 
aorta into the internal iliacs, it enters the hypogastric arter- 
ies, and thus is returned to the placenta. 

Secretory Organs. — A short time before the fifth month 
the sebaceous glands begin to develop, and their secretion is 
seen about two weeks later. The liver is developed about the 
fifth month, and forms bile which passes into the large and 
small intestine. The kidneys secrete during the latter half 
of intra-uterine life, and it is probable that the fetus voids 
its urine into the liquor amnii. 

Movements. — The movements of the fetus are recog- 
nized by the mother at about four and one-half months. It 
is probable that it moves its upper and lower extremities as 
early as the twelfth or sixteenth week. The fetus cannot 



522 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

see, hear, or smell. Taste is the first sense developed, and 
has been shown to exist in a child born at seven months. 

Changes after Birth. — After respiration is established, the 
ductus arteriosus begins immediately to contract, and is com- 
pletely-closed in from two to ten days. By the tenth day the 
foramen ovale is closed. It occasionally remains perma- 
nently open. This condition is known as cyanosis neona- 
torum. In from two to five days the umbilical veins and 
ductus venosus are obliterated, the former becoming the 
round ligament of the liver. 

SIGNS OF PREGNANCY. 

Ablsence of the menses. 

Nausea and vomiting. 

Enlargement and tingling sensations in the breast. 

Nervous disorders. 

Salivation. 

Irritability of the bladder. 

Leucorrhea. 

Abnormal temperature. 

Quickening. 

Changes in the vagina. 

Changes in the cervix and os uteri. 

Change of shape and size of the uterus. 

Intermittent contractions of the uterus. ' 

Uterine fluctuations. 

Movements of the fetus. 

LABOR. 

(Labor is the process by which the fetus and its appendages 
are separated from the mother, and is the physiological 
end of pregnancy.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Descent of the ITtems. — Descent of the uterus usually 
occurs from one to two weeks prior to labor; in some 



OBSTETRICS. 523 

instances only one or two days, and in others one month 
prior to confinement. The waist of the patient becomes 
smaller, respiration less difficult, and the pressure upon 
the stomach is relieved as the fetal head, enclosed by the 
lower portion of the uterus, descends into the cavity of the 
])elvis. The bladder and rectum become irritable after the 
sinking- of the uterus, and there is difficulty in locomotion, 
while the edema of the low"er limbs is increased. 

Secretions. — There is a glairy secretion from the glands 
of the cervix, which becomes mixed with blood as labor 
approaches. A profuse discharge indicates that the cervix 
will dilate rapidly. 

Changes in the Org-ans. — The vagina and external genitals 
are swollen and covered by a copious secretion, and the 
vagina becomes moist and relaxed, while the labia majora 
are separated. 

Contractions. — Painful uterine contractions occur, caus- 
ing little or no discomfort in the primipar^e, while in the 
jnultiparje they often become painful several days before 
labor. 

Indications. — The conditions which indicate that labor 
has begun are effacement and dilatation of the cervix, with 
uterine contractions regularly recurring. 

Stag-es. — Labor is divided into three stages. The first 
stage ends with the complete dilatation of the cervix. The 
second stage begins after the cervix is dilated, ending with 
the expulsion of the child. The third stage includes the 
detachment and the expulsion of the placenta. 

First Stage. — In the first stage the pains are "acute," 
"grinding," or "cutting," beginning in the lumbo-sacral 
region, and extending to the pubes, radiating down the 
thighs. The contractions of the uterus, the compression of 



524 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

the uterine nerves, and dilatation of the cervix are the 
causes of the pain. 

Second Stage. — Tn the second stage there is a sensation 
of tearing and stretching. They are spoken of as "bearing- 
down'' pains. The abdominal muscles are now brought into 
play, increasing, by their contractions, the suffering of the 
patient. Cramps occur in the legs; there is a sense of tear- 
ing ai)art of the perineum and the vulvo-vaginal canal ; there 
is also a sensation of tenesmus in the rectum. The causes 
of these pains are obviously the pressure exerted by the 
fetus upon the nerves and organs of the pelvis, and the 
stretching of the pelvic soft parts. 

Dilatation of the Cervix. — The uterine ca\dty decreases 
in size as the os dilates, and the action of the muscular 
fibers of the body of the uterus draws the cervix up over the 
advancing part of the fetus. At the commencement of the 
uterine contraction the cervix becomes irregular, as if puck- 
ered, thicker, and the os decreases in size. A little later, 
however, the os increases in size and the cervix becomes thin. 
A s dilatation of the cervix advances the decrease in the size 
of the OS does not take place at the beginning of a 
contraction. 

The dilatation is more rapid as the second stage ad- 
vances; the cervix no longer points posteriorly and toward 
the left, but assumes a more central position. The longi- 
tudinal muscular fibers of the body and the fundus of the 
uterus overcome the action of the circular fibers of the 
(•ervix, and tend to pull it open. 

Water-Bag. — The water-bag encloses the liquor amnii, 
projecting through the os uteri. It is first shaped like the 
crystal of a watch, but becomes hemispherical later. The 
size and form of the bag of water depends upon the pres- 
entation of the fetus and upon the extent of the dilatation 



0B8TETIUCS. 525 

of the OS. The bag usually ruptures at the time the dilatation 
of the cervix is complete. 

Abdominal Muscles. — The muscles of the abdomen assist 
the uterus in the expulsion of the fetus during the second 
stage of labor. Their action is voluntary, until the head is 
being expelled from the vulva, when the patient loses all 
control, and reflex action takes place. 

Dilatation of the Vagina. — The vagina is dilated by the 
descent of the presenting part, offering but little resistance, 
except at its orifice, where the head may be delayed. At each 
contraction the head advances, but recedes again in the 
interval of the utero-abdominal effort. This process is con- 
tinued until the parietal protuberances escape from the 
vulva, when it becomes fixed. Almost immediately a strong 
contraction follows, and the head is born. A short interval 
of rest usually follows, and the body is expelled by a 
renewal of the contractions. The birth of the child is fol- 
lowed by a discharge of liquor amnii mixed with blood. 

Third Stage — Detachment of the Placenta. — The placenta 
is usually expelled in from ten to twenty minutes. The 
blood becoming clotted in the mouths of the vessels, and 
chiefly through uterine retraction, prevents hemorrhage, the 
muscular fibers of the uterus acting as living ligatures. Its 
detachment is accomplished by uterine retraction. The pla- 
centa is expelled by contraction of the uterus, assisted by 
voluntary efforts, and is detached almost simultaneously in 
all parts. 

Effects of Labor on the Mother. — The arterial pressure is 
increased during the uterine contractions, and the pulse 
becomes more rayjid, declining again in the interval of pain. 
The respirations become slower during the pains, and more 
rapid in the intervals. The temperature rises as labor 
advances. During the first stage vomiting may occur, but 



526 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

lias no significance. If, during the second stage, weak uter- 
ine contractions and exhaustion is accompanied by vomit- 
ing, immediate delivery is indicated. 

The duration olMabor averages about seventeen hours in 
primipame; in multipanB, about twelve hours. 

Arrangement of Bed. — The bed should be so placed as to 
allow access from both sides. Upon it should be placed a 
mattress made of some firm material. Over the lower portion 
of Ihe mattress spread a rubber cloth, to protect it, and over 
this spread a comforter or blanket. Over the comforter place 
a folded sheet, and over the upper part of the mattress place 
another sheet folded once upon itself. Kemove the rubber 
cloth and everything upon it after labor, and bring down 
over the lower half of the mattress the, lower half of the 
upper sheet. 

The clothing of the patient should be raised upon the 
hips, and a sheet folded once secured to it by means of safety 
pins. After delivery, remove the sheet and bring the clothing 
down over the hips and limbs. 

MANAGP]MENT. 

First Stage. — The urine should be passed frequently, and 
the cathether used should there be retention. If the rectum 
is found to contain feces, it should be emptied at once by 
an injection of soap and water. If the membranes do not 
rupture as soon as the cervix is fully dilated, they should be 
ruptured; this may be readily accomplished with the end 
of a hairpin pressed against the amniotic pouch during a con- 
traction of the uterus, or the membrane may be broken 
with the nail of the iudex finger during a pain. The dila- 
tation of the cervix shonld not be artificially interfered with, 
but left to Nature in normal labor. 



OBSTETRICS. 527 

TREATMENT. 

As the dilatation of the cervix and descent of the head 
into the pelvis are favored by a sitting or upright posture, 
the patient should not be permitted to lie down, until the 
pain has become rather severe, when the operator should 
place the hand just above the pul'es, pressing the muscles 
gently downward, and placing the index and second finger 
upon either side of and against the clitoris. A pressure at 
this point causes the circular fibers around the os uteri to 
relax without pain. This pressure should be continued until 
the cervix is fully dilated and the head of the fetus has 
reached the floor of the pelvis. If the fingers are removed 
for an instant, the patient will suffer intense pain, while 
instant relief is the result of a continuation of the pressure. 

TREATMENT. 
Second Stage. — As soon as the cervix is fully dilated, 
remove the fingers from the clitoris, and apply a strong 
pressure upon either side and very close to the spinous proc- 
esses of the three lower lumbar vertebra?. As long as this 
pressure is continued the labor will proceed very rapidly, 
and with scarcely any pain, comparatively, up to the time of 
delivery, when two or three very severe pains may be ex- 
pected. At this time the patient should assume the left 
lateral position. This position lessens the danger of rup- 
turing the perineum, and enables the operator to make such 
manipulations as may be needed. If the perineum is not 
sufficiently relaxed to allow the escape of the head without 
producing a laceration, it should be retarded by direct press- 
ure; the knees of the patient should be drawn toward the 
abdomen, and a folded pillow placed between them. Place 
the left hand over the right thigh of the patient, and with 
the thumb on the occiput, and the fingers on the anterior 



528 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

part of the fetal head, hold it back during contraction. Sup- 
port the perineum with the right hand, placed in such a posi- 
tion that the fold between the thumb and index finger is in 
relation with the anterior edge; press gently in the direction 
of the symphysis, during a pain. It is sometimes advisable 
to introduce one or two fingers into the rectum, and draw 
the perineum forward toward the symphysis, at the same 
instant retarding the progress of the head by a pressure of 
the thumb. After the head is delivered, it should be held in 
the right hand, while the left placed upon the abdomen fol- 
lows the uterus as it descends, and forces out the body. 

ICnlarge the loop, if the cord is coiled around the neck, 
and draw carefully over the child's head, or deliver the 
shoulders and body through the loop, or, failing in this, 
ligate each end, and divide the cord. Always support the 
perineum during the delivery of the shoulders. The most 
common delay is caused by an arrest of the anterior shoul- 
der beneath the symphysis. Under such circumstances, 
make traction directly downward with the hands placed on 
the sides of the head. To assist in the expulsion of the poste- 
rior shoulder, it may be necessary to direct the head toward 
the symphysis, at the same time making slight traction. 
After the shoulders are delivered, the body is rapidly 
expelled. 

In all obstetrical cases in which Osteopathy has been 
applied the results have been something remarkable, the 
hours of confinement being reduced about two thirds, while, 
if the treatment is applied correctly, the pain is reduced 
to a minimum. 

It appears that a pres.sure upon the sides of the clitoris 
in the first stage of labor, and a strong pressure upon the 
loioer lumbar region in the second stage, cause the parts to 
relax in such a manner as to obviate, with proper attention, 



OBSTETRICS. 529 

all danger of laceration, in all instances, except those in 
which a malformation in the pelvis or an abnormally large 
Jiead in the fetus would necessitate the use of surgical' 
instruments. 

MANAGEMENT. 

The Child. — The child should be p/aced away from the 
jnother's discharges, near the side of the bed, care being 
exercised not to pull upon the cord. Clear the mucus from 
the throat and mouth with the finger, and if respiration does 
not occur, place the child in a basin of hot water, leaving 
the chest exposed, after which, dash cold water upon it, 
until breathing is established. Under osteopathic treatment 
it is seldom necessary to resort either to the above or to 
artificial respiration 

Tying the Cord. — Tie the cord about three flngerbreadths 
from the umbilicus with one ligature, the other at a distance 
of two inches from the first toward the placenta. The cord 
should not be tied until after the child breathes freely and 
the pulsations have decreased in force. Always examine 
the cut surface of the cord to see if the ligature has been 
applied correctly before handing the child to the nurse. 
Tender certain circumstances it is advisable not to ligate the 
cord until the pulsations have entirely ceased. The advan- 
tages of this plan are that the child receives more blood and 
loses less weight during the first week following birth, and is 
especially indicated in children who are poorly nourished or 
who are born prematurely. 

Third Stage. — After delivery of the child, the mother 
should be placed upon the back, while the nurse, immediately 
after the birth, should place her hand over the uterus and 
keep it in that position until the operator is ready to attend 
to the delivery of the placenta. 



530 OSTEOPATHT COMPLETE. 

TREATMENT. 

Immediatelj after tying and severing the cord, and 
before tlie delivery of the placenta, the operator should flex 
the patient's limbs, one at a time, upon the abdomen ; while 
in this position, place the chin over the patient's knee, one 
hand upon the great trochanter, the other grasping the 
ankle; mth the chin give gentle but strong adduction to the 
knee, press hard with the hand upon the trochanter, and with 
the other hand adduct the foot as the limb is gently extended. 
Treat the opposite limb in a similar manner. 

This treatment will not occupy over one minute, and 
should never be omitted, as patients treated in this manner 
never suffer with pain in the hips and thighs, and are able 
walk with comfort at a much earlier period. 

To Peliver the Placenta. — Make very gentle but rather 
strong friction over the body and fundus of the uterus, 
through the wall of the abdomen. The placenta is usually 
expelled from the uterus after three or four uterine contrac- 
tions. During this period an assistant should make gentle 
bat rather strong pressure upon the two or three lower verte- 
brae, as this pressure reduces the pain, without in the least 
affecting the strength of the uterine contractions. After the 
placenta has been expelled into the vagina, traction may be 
made upon the cord, and extraction slowly accomplished, at 
the same time keeping up a pressure upon the fundus of the 
uterus. If the placenta is gradually removed, there is no 
danger of any part of the membrane being torn. It is advis- 
able, however, that the placenta should be removed with 
two or three revolutions, so as to twist the membranes into 
a rope. 

MANAGEMENT. 

Binder.— The binder should extend from the ensiform 
cartilage to the trochanters, and be pinned securely with 



OBSTETRICS. 53 1 

safety pins. Unbleaclied muslin makes a good bandage. 
Should it become necessary to use compression over the 
uterus, three iirm rolls should be made of as many towels 
rather thicker than the wrist; place one of them transversely 
just above the uterus, and the other two at the sides of the 
uterus, pinning the bandage firmly over them. 

Washing the Child. — The vernix caseosa should be soft- 
ened with the yelk of an egg and some oily substance, and 
removed. The temperature of the bath should be about 98 
degrees. A very fine soap should be used to cleanse the 
child, as the common article is apt to irritate the skin. The 
child should be carefully dried and the belly-band applied 
after bathing. 

Bandage. — The bandage around the child's body should 
be loose when first applied ; otherwise, on account of the in- 
crease of the pulmonary capacity, it may become too tight in 
the course of a few hours. 

REMARKS. 

We consider that the greatest triumph of Osteopathy is in 
ijie treatment of diseases of women and in obstetrics. 

Of the many obstetrical cases that have come under our 
observation, we have never met with a single instance in 
which the results were not entirely satisfactory. 

Me might mention in this connection the case of a lady, 
wlio, ill two previous confinements, had narrowly escaped 
death, the labor being prolonged on each occasion over 
forty-eight hours, and it being mouths before she had entirely 
recovered. Upon both of these occasions the case was in 
charge of the best obstetricians that money could procure. 
Under osteopathic treatment, in her third confinement, the ' 
labor lasted bat a little over two hours, and upon the 
seventh day she was enjoying her usual health. 



532 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

We might mention many other cases equally remarkable, 
and feel that we are justified in making the assertion that in' 
all cases, where some malformation does not render it abso- 
lutely necessary to use instruments, the above treatment, 
properly administered, will reduce the time of labor and suf- 
fering of the patient at least three-fourths. 

In case of delayed uterine contraction, before the pla- 
centa is expelled, wring a towel out of cold water, fold it 
two or three times, and lay it on the mother's abdomen, 
which will cause the uterus to immediately contract and 
expel the placenta. 

It is always advisable, immediately after the delivery of 
the placenta, to inject a pint of cold water into the uterus, 
thus causing the uterus to contract, and obviating the danger 
of hemorrhage. 

The mother should have a hot vaginal douche daily dur- 
ing the first twelve or fourteen days after confinement. 

The mother should be permitted to lie in any position she 
may desire after confinement; the old custom of keeping the 
patient on the back for a number of days being a prolific 
source of "milk-leg." 

"Milk-leg" usually ocurs in the left leg, from the fact 
that the right common iliac artery lies immediately over the 
left common iliac vein, thereby acting as a ligature, obstruct- 
ing the return current of blood, when the patient is kept 
lying upon the back. (See cut 50.) 

MASTITIS, OR QATHERED BREASTS. 
(Inflammation of the breasts; may terminate in suppuration.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

When inflammation occurs in the tissues behind the 
breast and on which it is placed, the pain is severe, throbbing, 
deep-seated, and increased by moving the arm and shoulder; 




Cut 50. — The Iliac Arteries and Veins. 



OBSTETRICS. 535 

the breast becomes swollen, red, and more prominent, 
being pushed forward by the abscess behind. Sometimes, 
but less frequently, the breast itself is involved, when the 
pain becomes very acute and cutting, the swelling very con- 
siderable, and there is much constitutional disturbance — 
quick, full pulse, hot skin, thirst, headache, sleeplessness, 
etc. This variety of gathered breasts is preceded hy rigors 
(shivering fits), followed by heat. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Raise the arms high above the head, with the knee 
between the shoulders, lowering the arms with a backward 
motion. 

2. Move all the muscles near the breasts very deeply. 

3. Move the breasts gently in all directions, raising 
them up and endeavoring to free all the glands, muscles, 
and circulation. 

Treat every few hours. Immediate relief, and a cure in 
a very short time, will be the result. 

PHLEGMASIA, ALBA DOLENS, OR "MILK-LEG." 

(Acute edema from venous obstruction, usually in the 

left leg.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Swelling, pain, and general fever. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Flex the limb gently but strongly against the abdo- 
men ; giving strong abduction of the knee and adduction of 
the foot as the limb is extended. 

2. Grasping the limb close to the thigh, with one hand 
on each side, move the flesh gently but deep the entire length 
of the limb. 



536 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

8. Flex the limb and cause the patient to lie in such a 
I)Ositiou as to relieve the pressure on the left common iliac 
vein (see cut 50). 

Treatment should be given each day. In acute cases a 
speedy recovery may be expected. In chronic cases from 
four to twelve weeks may be required. 

PTJEaPERAL SEPTICEMIA, PUERPERAL FEVER, OR 
"CHILD-BED FEVER." 

(An acute febrile affection, heterogenetic and contagious, 
peculiar to women in childbirth.) 

SYMPTOMS. 

Chill; fever; usually occurring about the third day; 
lotthia diminished or arrested; secretion of milk lessened; 
severe pain on pressure; nausea and vomiting; constipa- 
tion; urine becomes scanty and high-colored; pulse varies 
from too to 150; jaundice may occur; temperature often 
reaches 105; finally terminates in convalescence or typhoid 
fever. Often mistaken for malarial fever. 

TREATMENT. 

1. Place the patient on the side; beginning at the 
upper cervicals, move the muscles upward and outward 
gently but thoroughly the entire length of the spinal column. 

2. Flex the limbs, one at a time, slowly but strongly 
against the abdomen, abducting the knee and adducting the 
foot as the limb is gently extended. 

?>. Place the hands on each side of the neck, the fingers 
almost meeting over the upper cervicals; tip the head gently 
backward, pressing quite strongly at the same time upon the 
vaso-motor (page 253). 



OBSTETRICS. 537 

4. Large injections of cool water should be given each 
day to free the bowels; also give hot vaginal douches each 
day, and oftener, if necessary. 

PUERPERAL MANIA. 
(Delirium or madness, often following labor.) 

TREATMENT. 

1. See Puerperal Septicemia (page 536.) 

2. Thorough Treatment of the Xeck (page 393), 



-34- 



538 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 



Dietetics. 



Dietetics, which, properly defined, is that branch of 
hygiene which relates to the proper use of food, so as to 
adapt the quantity and quality of the diet to the particular 
state of each person, and to extract the greatest quantity of 
nutriment from a given quantity of nutritive matter, is a 
subject of vast import to all, and altogether too generally 
disregarded. 

ivaturally, it has been copiously written upon, and 
while, as on most all other subjects, there have been not only 
slight variations of opinion, but complete conflict, many 
physiological truths have undoubtedly been evolved, and 
some things of importance, perhaps, discovered and set forth 
by nearly every thinker, observer, experimentalist, and 
author. However, there is no system of government, of 
religion, of ethics, of philosophy, or of science that is complete 
in the knowledge of men, nor can there be, in real sense, a 
perfect system outside of that which comprises all, and which 
is the Creator's handiwork, and is under the laws of the Om- 
nipotent. Man is finite and limited in conception and execu- 
tion. He gets but glimpses of the truth — the superficial view 
of things. He succeeds in tracing nothing to its beginning 
or ultimate termination, and rarely sees more than a few of 
the numerous sides, colors, and shapes. 

But we are now in an age of intense progress. The social 
world is vigorously combating selfishness and injustice, and 
establishing systems of equity; the mechanical world is 
making gigantic strides; the scientific world is rapidly dis- 



DIETETICS. 539 

engaging itself from mere theories, hypotheses, and guess- 
work, and, with Nature as a guide, applying her principles. 
is effectually proving their efficacy by the results obtained. 
All are getting nearer to Nature. 

There is, though, a tendency, and it is a thing to be 
regretted, that founders and practitioners of new methods, 
however good they may be, are unable or unwilling to per- 
ceive good in other methods than their own. 

We ought ever to be on the watch for, and have our 
eyes and ears accessible to, truths, that we may be enabled 
to grasp and take possession of them, though they eject us 
from our fostered opinions or trodden paths of life. To 
de(;line to consider truth because not prevalent or popular, 
or because it appears antagonistic to the settled course of 
our past existence, is to render verdict without evidence. 

Xo mere prejudice should be allowed to influence the 
osteopath in accepting or repelling established facts. There 
are methods of accelerating and effecting cures besides 
righting disx>lacements, which students of therapeutics may 
easily discover. 

In considering the subject of dietetics, it may be divided 
into three parts, viz.: 

1. T\'hen to eat. 

2. What to eat. 

3. How to eat. 

Almost the entire attention of dietarians has been 
directed to the latter two, Avhile the former has been re- 
gai'ded (or, rather, disregarded) as settled by the established 
habit of the people. 

But how fortunate for humankind that occasionally a 
Franklin swings wide the door, looks into the household, and 
discovers within the immutable workings of Nature. 

The above division of the subject could well have begun 



540 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

Avith ''Why" to eat. In everything we do, in order to per- 
form the work properly, there must be an aim, an end to be 
accomplished. Nature in all her varied forms and functions 
has a definite object, the attainment of which we perceive 
everywhere in cause and effect. 

To understand some of these important purposes, obser- 
vation and investigation is being pursued now as never be- 
fore, and the value of the discoveries rated by results rather 
than theory. 

The taking of food, then, is designed to succor some 
special want. 

History is so replete with reminders showing how man- 
kind are wont to differ in opinions, even in regard to the 
simplest commonplace matters of life, that it can hardly be 
wondered at that people, even at the present time, are 
not familiar with the correct nature of these deeper subjects, 
and that they are often confounded. 

If in manj' matters we apprehended their true signifi- 
cance, undoubtedly our tactics would effectually change. 

Too many, alas ! think, or at least infer by their actions, 
that the sole object is attained if they can succeed in intro- 
ducing food, as much of it as possible, and without regard 
to quality, into their perhaps delicate and overworked 
stomachs. 

It is a common fault that vastly more food is taken 
than is ph^'siologically required, thus not only affecting 
metabolic equilibrium, but overtaxing the digestive organs 
and the nervous system. 

It is not the quantity or quality of food taken into the 
stomach, but the amount and kind digested, absorbed, and 
made use of in the economy, that gives us good blood, nerves, 
muscles, bones, and fat. 

Perfect digestion will insure good assimilation and 



DIETETIC8. 541 

nutrition; bnt if poor, the blood is furnished half-digested, 
fermented material, irritating the nerves and organs. The 
result may be disease, the weakest part or organ giving way 
first. 

Food replaces the waste of the body tissues — ^this is the 
end of food, the " 'why' to eat."' We get our exhausted 
strength back by rest and sleep — our waste restored by food. 

To those of insight this fact will immediately present 
itself as a principle of great meaning, and is especially a 
striking feature to be well considered by brain-workers who 
have but little manual labor to perform. 

Much might be said as to the necessity of the requisite 
amount of sleep; and of the need of not permitting undue 
mental or physical work to directly impair digestive power. 
But the college of experience is a perpetual fountain of 
enlightenment. 

In entering upon the consideration of when to eat, it 
is with the utmost confidence, inspired by those who have 
tested the ''better way of living,'-' and knowledge, gained 
through experience, that to abstain from all nutriment until 
the vital power within shall have put the living organism in 
such a normal condition as to demand pabulum for the 
renewal of wasted tissue, or a further supply for the pro- 
duction of animal heat through the medium of a divine-given 
instinct, is to clear the com.plexion; reduce surplus fat; re- 
store lack of flesh; feel conscious of a better digestion; reveal 
the power of the soul within through the sparkling eyes; 
brighten the source of all physical, mental, and moral energy; 
disperse any tendency to fullness of the face and flushness 
in the head; bring keenness of appetite, and such enjoyment 
of meals as childhood days only knew; experience a lightness 
and quickness of step, a more elastic spring in all the limbs, 
and an absence of the fullness and unpleasantness after 



542 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

eating, SO often felt before; and to know that the food does 
not lie so long in the stomach — the useful organ has gone 
out of the gas-produoing business. 

In illness, to urge nutriment prior to completion of 
•'destructive assimilation" and the recurrence of a natural 
desire for food only tends to burden and retard vital action, 
and to lessen the chance of recovery for the sick. 

There is a remedy, that is the greatest of all, to create 
hunger, a genuine appetizer, one that you will undoubtedly 
habitually make use of when you learn of its natural adapt- 
ability and effectiveness, for it never fails to cause the keen- 
est hunger, relish, and delight, is absolutely safe in its opera- 
tion, and available to all. By its constant use eating be- 
comes a luxury. 

The sense of refreshment does not come when food is 
taken without hunger, even in health, as there is restriction 
of both digestion and absorption. 

The mucous lining of the stomach is both an excretory 
and absorbing membrane; it despatches its wonderful solv- 
ent juices when hunger suggests the need. There is immedi- 
ate digestion, immediate absorption, and an immediate and 
continuous feeling of refreshment until hunger is satiated. 
which is one of the most keenly delightful in human 
exxjeriences. 

But what is hunger? The identity of true hunger is so 
apt to be confused with acquired appetite or morbid craving 
that the uninitiated are likely to arrive at a too sudden 
conclusion. 

Dr. Dewey, the originator of the "no breakfast" method 
and author of "The New Science of Living: The New Gos- 
pel of Health," a grand book of life— a gleam of life in every 
sentence and on every page a glow of precious truth,— 
defines hunger as "a condition arising from general activi- 



DIETETICS. 543 

ties, attended with a sense of fatigue and a desire for nour- 
ishing food." In other words, it is a call for both rest and 
refreshment — rest first, food next. This need must always 
depend upon the degree of exhaustion of the brain batteries 
and the loss through the muscle activities. Hunger is a 
sense that is meant to express the degree of waste, but it is 
so involved with brain fatigue that it is seldom manifest in a 
natural way. Only the laborer in the free fresh air who has 
no mental taxing can have the most natural hunger. 

As a rule, mind-workers eat vastly more than waste 
indicates. 

What need can there be to tax the digestive powers and 
the power-house of the human plant — the brain — in the 
morning, after a night's sleep and rest which has recharged 
the electric batteries with renewed strength, restored the 
whole system to its physiological balance, and occasioned 
but very little waste of the body materials? 

There is ample ground by which to determine that the 
omission of the morning meal is based on the soundest 
physiology. 

"But," you say, "I am hungry in the morning. I cannot 
give up breakfast. Breakfast is my best meal. I have 
always eaten breakfast. I could not do mj forenoon's work 
if my breakfast were denied me. I would be too weak. I 
believe I would faint." 

My friend, think. 

Is it not possible that your morning desire is not a 
natural hunger, but seeming hunger, being only appetite, the 
acquired result of a life-long untimely meal, thus only an 
impetus of the force of habit? 

We are such creatures of circumstances, such slaves to 
acquired habit. 

If the tippler's craving for his morning dram, the smok- 



544 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

er's draft of the stinging weed, or any of the numerous hab- 
itudes of the day which are not physiological, but still per- 
sisted in, because, even with the realization of their damnific 
traits, they think they '^cannot do without it," and will not 
appoint minds quartermaster over their sensualities, is any 
argument tending to convince that your morning impulse 
may be but the response to the impressive tinkling of Mr. 
Habit's bell, then couple this with the easily deducible fact 
that morning hunger, after a sufficient period of invigorating 
sleep, is a physiological impossibility. 

By transferring the first meal to the noonday hour, or 
waiting until adequate waste-producing exertions to guar- 
antee a natural calling for pabulum, and insure a more vig- 
orous digestion and rapid absorption, the changes for the 
better, bodily and mentally, vv^ill soon decide the future 
course of action that should be pursued. 

By following this physiological method of living your 
friends will soon notice the change that is being wrought 
within you, and it will require no scrutinizing to detect your 
increased store of cheerfulness. 

Cheer of mind is a primal law of life. Cheer is to digest- 
ive energy what a current of air is to the flame. There 
cannot be even a slight dejection without proportionately 
reducing the supply of the supporting and constructive mate- 
rials, by diminishing the very motive power of the digestive 
function, and causing not apparent, but real exhaustion or 
decrease of mental and physical power. 

It may be thought that if no breakfast is eaten, then a 
late supper would be advantageous. This is erroneous. 
There should be completion of digestion before the condition 
of sleep is entered. 

It is Nature's design that digestion should take place 
after the general muscular activities have generated a de- 



DIETETICS. 545 

mand, and with the body in an upright attitude. To be per- 
formed aright, this is requisite; and the infliction of penalty 
for evfery non-observance of Nature's laws is infallible. The 
erect posture facilitates the circular movement, known as 
peristaltic action, of the food around the walls of the stom- 
ach. In the lying posture the pressure of the food affects 
the dependent portions of the stomach, and the mechanical 
operation is imperfect; besides, in this position, especially 
during sleep, there is the minimum necessity for digestive 
energy, there being so little waste from cell-destruction. 

The sympathies and relations between the stomach and 
the batteries of the brain are very intimate, and a constant 
call is made upon these batteries to furnish power during the 
process of digestion. Digestion is a tax upon the brain cen- 
ters under the best of digestive conditions; one that in- 
volves loss of mental and physical energy during its active 
stage. 

There can be no complete rest or recharging of the ex- 
hausted batteries if masses of fermenting food disturb and 
compel them to action. 

Many are beginning to realize that the amount and the 
food to be passed through the alimentary canal, in order to 
produce rich blood, preserve the health of body and mind, 
and prolong life, must be from a physiological standpoint. 
Some who are living — and very well — on only one meal a 
day, taken at the meridional hour, would not turn back to 
the old way, and have indeed good reasons to be enthusiastic. 

Good works can be procured on the quality and pureness 
of food, and it is desirable to have knowledge of their nature, 
but it will be a surprise to those who adopt the ''better way" 
what a splendid judge of the bill of fare natural hunger is. 

The food should be thoroughlv masticated and mixed 



546 OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

^ith saliva for reasons we all are familiar with, but too 
careless about. 

Abolishing the habit of drinking at meals will incite 
slower eating and more thorough mastication and 
insalivation. 



INDRX. 



Abdomen, disease of, cause of, how 
to ascertain, 145. 

dropsy of, 192. 
Abdominal muscles in labor, 525. 

viscera, nerves to, vaso-motor, 
254. 
Abductor muscles, stretching, 203. 
Abnormal shape of heart, 119. 

structure of heart, 119. 

temperature in spinal column, 
153. 
Abscess, antrum, 413 

cerebral, 356. 

esophageal, 425. 

hepatic, 208. 

of lungs, 87. 

perirenal, 251. 

pulmonary, 87. 

renal, 250. 

retro-pharyngeal, 422. 

of vulvo-vaginal gland, 495. 
Absence of menstruation, 475. 
Accelerator, cardio-, center, 22. 
Accumulation, urine, 439. 
Acetabular coxalgia, 459. 
Acid, uric, excess of, 199. 
Acne, 439. 

Actinomycosis, 281. 
Action of bowels, starting-, 149. 

diaphragm, slowing, 98. 

heart, deranged, 122. 
feeble, 114. 
too rapid, 116, 119. 

liver, starting, 149. 
weakened, 149. 

pancreas, starting, 149. 
Action, peristaltic, 173. 

checking, 167. 168. 

increasing, 167. 

weakened, 149. 
Activity, glandular, 11, 14. 
.Acute ascending paralysis, 352. 

Bright's disease, 239. 

bronchitis, 75. 

cases, frequency of treating, 32. 
treatment in, 35. 

catarrhal otitis media, 403. 
vulvitis, 493. 

cerebral softening, 355. 
' dysentery, 183. 

endometritis, 483. 

enteritis, 167. 

esophagitis, 424. 

exudative and productive ne- 
phritis, 239. 



gastritis, 156. 

gout, 303. 

hepatitis, 207. 

laryngitis, 414. 

lithemia, 199, (cut, 205). 

metritis, 481. 

miliary tuberculosis, 84. 

myelitis, 342. 

nasal catarrh, 407. 

pancreatitis, 218. 

peritonitis, 190. 
pelvic, 498. 

pharyngitis, 421. 

phlyctenular keratitis, S99. 

pleurisy, 90. 

rheumatism, 284. 
articular, 284. 
muscular, 295. 

rhinitis, 407. 

spinal meningitis, 335. 

yellow atrophy, 207. 
Addison's disease, 252. 
Adjustment, skeleton, 11, 12. 
Afferent nerve-fibers, 21. 
Ague, 261. 

Air in pleural cavity, 90. 
Air-cells of lungs, dilatation of, 85. 
Akromegalia, 456. 
Alba dolens, 535. 
Albugo, 401. 
Albuminuria, 233. 
Amenorrhea, 475. 
Amygdalitis, 427. 
Amyloid degeneration, hepatic, 210. 

intestinal, 190. 

renal, 249. 
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 349. 
Anal fissure, 450. 
Analgesic panaris, 352. 
Anasarca, 125. 
Anatomy, blood-vessels, 106. 

circulation, 276. 

diaphragm, 323. 

heart, 104. 

intestines, 138. 

kidneys, 229. 

liver, 194. 

lungs, 51. 

pancreas, 216. 

spleen, 222. 

stomach, 132. 
Anchylosis, 461. 
Androsis, 436. 
Anemia, 128. 

cerebral, 352. 

spinal, 333. 



548 



INDEX. 



Aneurism, intracranial, 366. 

thoracic, 122. 
Angina pectoris, 120. 
Aneuresis, 232. 
Anuria, 232. 
Ani, prolapsus, 448. 
Ano, fistula in, 449. 
Answers, questions and, 40. 
Anteflexion, 466, 468, 472. 
Anterior poliomeylitis, 348. 

spinal curvature, 452. 
Anteversion, 466, 467, 471. 
Anthrax, 280. 
Antrum abscess, 413. 
Anus, diseases of, 445, 449. 
Aorta, dilatation of, 122. 

rupture of, 122. 
Aperients, 147. 
Apex of lung, 51. 
Aphthous glossal ulcer, 429. 

stomatitis, 430. 
Apoplexy, 354. 
Appendicitis, 184, (cut, 185). 
Appendix, vermiform, inflammation 

of, '184. 
Applied, how, vibration, 36. 
Apply, how to, Osteopathy, 34. 
Ardent fever, 256. 
Areolar hyperplasia, 482. 
Arm, joint of, arthritis in, 457. 

rheumatism in, (cut, 291). 
Arms above head dangerous in 
heart disease, drawing, 112. 
as levers, 59, 153. 
Arteries, 106. 
bronchial, 54. 
contraction of, 254. 
dilatation of, by, 255. 
Arterio-capillary fibrosis, ""22. 
Artery, constriction of, 18. 
hepatic, 196. 

branches, 196. 
pressure on an. 111. 
pulmonary, 53. 
splenic, 223. 
Arthritic coxalgia, 459. 

muscular atrophy, 350. 
Arthritis, 456. 

rheumatoid, 303. 
Articular rheumatism, acute, 284. 
chronic, 294. 
subacute, 294. 
Ascending paralysis, acute, 352. 
Ascites, 192. 
Asiatic Cholera, 266. 
Asphyxia, local, 379. 
Asthma, 42, 44, 60. 

hay, 260. 
Ataxia, hereditary, 348. 

locomotor, 344. 
Ataxic paraplegia,348. 
Atlas not dislocated, 28. 

dislocation of, how to reduce, 360. 
reducing, (cut, 363). 
Atresia vaginse, 503. 
Atrophic rhinitis, 412. 
Atrophy. 42, 333. 



muscular, arthritic, 350. 
progressive, 349. 
simple idiopathic, 350. 
uterine, 485. 
yellow, acute, 207. 
Auerbach's ganglionic plexus, 136. 
Aural vertigo, 405. 
Autumnal catarrh, 260. 



B 

Back, in female troubles, 469. 

weak, 298. 
Bag, water-, 524. 
Baker's itch, 436. 
Bandaging child, 531. 
Barber, Dr., 25. 

differs, 27, 28, 33, 145. , 
Bartholin, glands of, 512. 
Base of bladder, 437. 

lung, 52. 
Basedow's disease, 368. 
Bastard measles, 268. 
Bed, arrangement of, in labor, 526. 
Bed-wetting, 443. 
Bile, 195. 

Bile-duct, common, 195. 
Bile-ducts, 195. 
Biliary, calculi, 214. 
Biliousness, 199. 
Binder, 530. 

Birth, changes after, in fetus, 322. 
Blacktongue, 429. 
Blackhead, 436. 
Blackleg, Canadian, 311. 
Bladder, 437. 

arteries, 438. 

base, 437. 

closure, 438. 

diseases of, 437. 

fever, 436. 

gall-, 196. 

inflammation of, 213. 

inflammation of, 441. 

ligaments, 438. 
« neck, 438. 

nerves, 438. 

stone in, 441. 

veins, 438. 
Blebs, 436. 

Bleeding, spontaneous, 308. 
Blepharitis, ciliary, 400. 
Blood, 11, 16. 

in brain, deficiency of, 352. 

excess of. 353. 

in cavities of heart, cragulation 
of, 121. 

circulation, 45. 

circulation of, free, 11, 16. 

deficiency of, 128. 

diseases of the, 128. 

flow of, free, 18. 

in lungs, excess of, 85. 

in spinal cord, deficiency of,334. 
excess of, 335. 

white, 331. 



INDEX. 



549 



Blood-corpuscles, increasing, 75. 

white, 19. 

function of, 19. 
Blood-pressure, fall in, bj^ 255. 

increase-d by, 254. 
Blood-supply, freeing, 56. 

of liver, 149. 
Blood-vessels, 106. 

of bladder, 438. 

degeneration of, 122. 

diseases of, 104. 

of kidneys, 230. 

of liver, 196. 

of lungs, 53. 

of pancreas, 216. 

in skull, rupture of, 366. 

of spleen, 223. 

of uterus, 465. 
Bloody flux, 146. 
Body, laboratories of the, 15. 

of uterus, 452. 
Boils, 434. 
Bones, diseases of, 451. 

of human skeleton, 46. 

turbinated, hypertrophy of, 
Borders of lung, 52. 
Bothriocephalus latus, 190. 
Bowels, action of, starting, 149. 

cancer of, 1S9. 

consumption of, 190. 

cramp in, 177. 

kneading. 154, (cut, 157). 

wasting of, 190. 
Brachial plexus, (cut, 373). 
Brain, abscess of, 356. 

blood in, deficiency of, 352. 
excess of, 353. 

fever, 276. 

inflammation of, 354. 

softening of, 355. 

tumor of, 356. 
Branny tetter, 436. 
Breast-pang, 120. 
Breasts, gathered, 532. 
Breathing, difficult, 67. 

relieving, 164. 
Bright's disease, acute, 239. 

chronic, 240. 
Bronchi, dilatation of, 83. 

diseases of, 60. 

inflammation of, S3. 
Bronchia, inflammation of, 79. 
Bronchial arteries, 54. 

tubes, inflammation of, 75. 

vein, 55. 
Bronchiectasis, S3. 
Bronchitis, 42. 

acute, 75. 

capillary, 79. 

chronic, 79. 

fibrinous, 80. 

putrid, 80. 
Broncho-pneumonitis, 83. 
Bronchus, 53. 
Bulbar paralysis, 357. 
Bulbi vestibuli, 512. 



Calculi, biliary, 214. 
Calculus in intestine, 189. 
nasal, 412. 
renal, 247. 
vesical, 441. 
Canadian blackleg, 311. 
Cancer, 45. 

of bowels, 189. 
of kidneys, 249. 
of liver, 210. 
of peritoneum, 192. 
of rectum, 448. 
of stomach, 164. 
of uterus, 486. 
Cancrum oris, 431. 
Capillaries, pulmonary, 54. 
Capillary, arterio-, fibrosis, 122. 
bronchitis, 79. 

and lymphatic systems com- 
pared, 130. 
Capsule, Glisson's, inflammation of, 
213. 
of liver, 194. 
of pancreas, 216. 
Carbuncle, 434. 
Carcinoma, gastric, 164. 
hepatic, 210. 
intestinal, 189. 
nasal, 413. 
peritoneal, 192. 
rectal, 441. 
renal, 249. 
uterine, 486. 
Cardia, center for opening, 136. 
Cardiac dilatation, 118. 

functional disturbance, 122. 
hypertrophy, 118. 
malformation, 119. 
muscular tissue, inflammation 

of, 121. 
opening, 133. 
plexus, 105. 
thrombosis, 121. 
vertigo, 118. 
Cardinal principles of Osteopa- 
thy, 11. 
Cardio-accelerator center, 22. 
Caries, spinal, 451. 
Caruncle, urethral, 501. 
Cases, acute, frequency of treat- 
ing, 32. 
treatment in, 35. 
chronic, 29. 

frequency of treating, 32. 
treatment in, 35. 
of nervous origin, 113. 
cited, asthma, 67. 
atrophy, 334. 
brain fever, 278. 
cholera morbus, 177. 
dropsy, 126. 

general debility, 283. 284. 
headache, 316. 
heart disease, 112, 114. 



550 



INDEX. 



obstetrics, 531. 
paralysis, 330. 
rheumatism, 289, 290. 
rickets, 455. 

spinal compression, 338. 
trachoma, 394. 

treatment to equalize the cir- 
culation, 117. 
varicose veins, 124. 
Cataract, 401. 
•Catarrh, 28, 388. 
autumnal, 260. 
dry, 411. 
intestinal, 168. 
laryngeal, 414. 
nasal, acute, 407. 
in pharynx, 411. 
uterine, 480. 
Catarrhal conjunctivitis, 398. 
croup, 420. 
deafness, 388, 406. 
fever. 259. 
glossal ulcer, 429. 
jaundice, 214. 
otitis media, acute, 403. 

chronic, 405. 
pneumonia, S3, 
stomatitis, 430. 
vaginitis, simple, 489. 
vulvitis, acute, 493. 
chronic, 493. 
Cause of disease of, how to ascer- 
tain — 
abdomen, 145. 
thorax, 145. 
removal of, 12. 
Causes of disease, 29, 30. 

dislocation, 13. 
Cavernosa, corpora, 507. 
Cavities of heart, coagulation of 

blood in, 121. 
Cavity, peritoneal, fluid in, 192. 
pleural, air in, 90. 
of uterus, 465. 
Cecum, inflammation of, 187. 
Cells of liver, 194. 

of lung, 53. 
Cellulitis, pelvic, 500. 
Center, cardio-accelerator, 22. 
for contracting pjjlorus, 137. 

stomach, 136. 
erection, 518. 

nerve-, pressure upon a, dura- 
tion and frequency, 35. 
for opening cardia, 136. 
parturition, 22. 
splanchnic, pressure on, 156. 
vaso-motor, 253. 
Centers, 328. 

nerve-, important, 22. 

of stomach, inhibitory, 137. 

opening, 136. 
vaso-motor, 22. 
Cerebral abscess, 356. 
anemia, 352. 
embolism, 355. 
hemorrhage, 354. 



hyperemia, 353. 

meningitis, 354. 

softening, acute, 355. 
chronic, 356. 

thrombosis, 355. 

tubercular meningitis, 354. 

tumor, 356. 
Cerebritis, 354. 
Cerebro-spinal fever, 262. 

meningitis, 262. 

sclerosis, 357. 

system, 21. 
Cervical hypertrophy, 484. 

laceration, 485. 

muscles, spasms of, 424. 

pachymeningitis, 336. 

region, (cut, 361). 
Cervix, dilatation of, in labor, .521. 

of uterus, 452. 
Cestodes, 190. 
"Change of life," 505. 
Charbon, 280. 
Checking colicky pains, 167. 

peristaltic action, 167, 168. 
Chemicals, 15. 
Chest, dropsy of the, 97. 

expansion, 56. 

expanding, 59, (cuts, 63, 65, 81), 95. 
164, 166. 

muscles of, contraction of, 44. 

pains in, 33. 
Chicken-pox, 271. 
Child, bandaging, 531. 

management of, 529. 

washing, 531. 
Childbed fever, 536. 
Chlorosis, 128. 
Cholangitis, 213. 
Cholecystitis, 213. 
Cholera, Asiatic, 266. 

infantum, 178. 

morbus, 171, 328. 
case, 177. 
explanatory, 172. 
Chorea, 365. 
Chronic Bright's disease, 240. 

bronchitis, 79. 

cases, 29. 

frequency of treating, 32. 
why the osteopath prefers, 
255. 

catarrhal otitis media, 405. 
vulvitis, 493. 

cerebral softening, 356. 

corporeal endometritis, 483. 

diarrhea, 182. 

dislocated joints, 33. 

dysentery, 183. 

enteritis, 168. 

esophagitis, 425. 

gastritis, 156. 

gout; 305. 

hypertrophic rhinitis, 408. 

laryngitis, 416. 

lithemia, 204. 

metritis, 482. 

myelitis, 343. 



INDEX. 



551 



nephritis, exudative and produc- 
tive, 240. 
interstitial, 248. 

peritonitis, 192. 
pelvic, 499. 

pharyngitis, 422. 

pleurisy, 96. 

post-nasal rhinitis, 411. 

rheumatism, articular, 294. 
muscular, 295. 

spinal meningitis, 336. 

tonsillitis, 427. 
Chyle, amount of, 130. 
Chyluria, 234. 
Ciliarv blepharitis, 400. 
Circulation, 276. 

blood, 45. 

free, 11, 16. 

equalized by, 59. 

equalizing. Osteopathy in, 20. 

in fetus, 520. 

freeing, 166, (cuts, 331, 379). 
to head, 84. 
to leg, 203. 

lymphatic, 129. 

obstruction to, 11. 

systemic, 45. 

treatment to equalize the, 114. 
case, 117. 
Cirrhosis, hepatic, 209. 
Clavicle, raising, (cut, 371). 
Clitoris, 511. 
Closure of bladder, 438. 
Clothing while treated, 34. 
Coagulation of blood in cavities of 

heart, 121. 
Coccygodynia, 501. 
Coccyx, dislocation of, how to re- 
duce, 447. 
Cold in the head, 407. 

June, 260. 

rose. 260. 
Coldness of lower extremities, 18. 
Colds, 67. 

Colic, hepatic, 215. 
Colicky pains, checking, 167. 
Colon, 154. 
Comedo, 436. 
Common bile-duct, 195. 
Compared, capillary and lymphatic 

systems, 130. 
Comparison of digestive organs in 
constipation, 148. 

to telegraph system, 28. 
Complete anchylosis, 461. 

fistula, 449. 
Compound flexion, 473. 

lymph-glands, 130. 
Compression, spinal, 337. 
Conditions, not name^;, 56. 
Congenital spastic pp-aplegia, 348. 
(I'ongestion, hepatic, 217, 

pulmonary, 85. 

renal, 238. 
Congestive dysmenorrhea, 478. 
Conjunctiva, thickening of. 400. 
Conjunctivitis, catarrhal, 398. 

phlyctenular, 398. 



Constipation, 41, 145, 146, 147, 150, 
156, 304. 

caused by, treatment for, 153. 

causes of, secondary, 150. 

digestive organs in, compared, 
148. 

examination in, 150. 

muscles in, 148. 

contracted, relaxing, 149. 

physic for, 149. 

rib pressing on splanchnic in, 148. 
Constitutional diseases, 282. 
Constriction of artery, 18. 

cervix, 484. 

vein, IS. 
Consumption, 42, 44, 68. 

of bowels, 190. 

of kidneys, 249. 
Continued fever, simple, 258. 
Contracted muscles in constipation, 
relaxing, 149. 

of neck causes, 388. 
Contraction of arteries, 254. 

esophagus, 426. 

muscles, 29, 30, 153. 
of chest, 44. 
of neck, 277. 

pylorus, arrested by, 136. 
caused by, 136. 

thorax, 112. 

trachea, 424. 
Control of fever by, 59. 
Coordination of nerve-force, 11, 20. 
Cord, spermatic, 510. 

spinal, function of, 22. 

tying, 529. 
Cornea, inflammation of, 399. 

opacity of, 401. 

vascularization of, 401. 
Corpora cavernosa, 508. 
Corporeal endometritis, chronic, 483. 
Corpus spongiosum, 509. 
Corpuscles, blood-, increasing, 75. 

white, 19. 

function of, 19. 

red. deficiency of, 128. 
Coryza, 407. 

idiosyncratic, 260. 

vaso-motor, periodic, 260. 
Cough, whooping-, 269. 
Coughs, 67. 
Cowper's glands, 507. 
Coxalgia, 459. 

acetabular, 459. 

arthritic, 459. 

effusive, 459. 

femoral, 459. 

inflammatory, 459. 

suppurative, 459. 
Cramp in bowels, 177. 

in stomach, 181, 328. 

writer's, 370, (cut, 377). 
Cretinism, 456. 
Crossed eyes, 402. 
Croup, catarrhal, 420. 

membranous, 419. 

spasmodic, 420. 
Croupous pneumonia, 88. • 



552 



INDEX. 



Crusted scall, 436. 
Cures, instant, 37. 
Curvature, spinal, 452. 

anterior, 452. 

lateral, 452. 

posterior, 452. 
Cyst, hydatid, iiepatic, 210. 
renal, 249. 
splenic, 225. 

pancreatic, 221. 

parovarian, 490. 

of vulvo-vaginal gland, 495. 
Cystic duct, 195. 
Cystitis, 440. 

interstitial, 441. 
Cystocele, 503. 
Cytitis, 436. 

D 

Dacryocystitis, 400. 
Dance, St. Vitus', 365. 
Dander, 436. 
Dandruff, 436. 

Dangero^us treatments during preg- 
nancy, 33. 
Deafness, 28, 405. 

catarrhal, 388, 406. 
Debility, general, 282. 

nervous, 367. 
Deficiency of blood, 128. 
in brain, 352. 
in spinal cord, 334. 

red corpuscles, 128. 

urine, 232. 
Degeneration, amyloid, hepatic, 210. 
intestinal, 190. 
renal, 249. 

of blood-vessels, 122. 

of liver, 210. 
Delirium tremens, 382. 
Dementia, paretic, 358. 
Dengue, 272. 

Depressed ribs, raising, (cut, 69). 
Deranged action of heart, 122. 
Dermahemia, 436. 
Dermatitis, 436. 
Dermatolysis, 436. 
Dermatomycosis, 436. 
Dermatonosis, 436. 
Dermatorrhea, 436. 
Descent of uterus in labor, 522. 
Desensitization, osteopathic, 23. 
Detachment of placenta, 525. 
Dextrocardia, 119. 
Diabetes insipidus, 241, (cut, 243). 

mellitus, 242. 
Diaphragm, 323. 

action of, slowing, 98. 
Diaphragmatic pleurisy, 98. 
Diarrhea, 146, (cuts, 169, 175), 304. 

chronic, 182. 
Dietetics, 538. 

Differs, Dr. Barber, 27, 28, 33, 145 
Difficult breathing, relieving, 164. 

micturition, 444. 
Diffuse interstitial hypertrophy,482. 

parenchymatous keratitis, 399. 



Digestion, 172. 

Digestive organs in constipation 

compared, 148. 
Dilatation of air-cells of lungs, 85. 

aorta, 122. 

arteries by, 255. 

bronchi, 83. 
cardiac, 118. 
of cervix in labor, 524. 
esophageal, 426. 
of stomach, 163. 
of vagina in labor, 525. 
Diphtheria, 19, 273. 
simple, 273. 
malignant, 273. 
Diphtheritic laryngitis, 415. 
rhinitis, 411. 
vaginitis, 492. 
vulvitis, 494. 
Disease of abdomen, cause of, how 
to ascertain, 145. 
Addison's, 252. 
Basedow's, 368. 
Bright's, acute, 239. 

chronic, 240. 
causes of, 29, 30. 
flesh-worm, 280. 
foot-and-mouth, 281. 
Friedreich's, 348. 
Grave's, 368. 
heart, 33, 42, 44, 45, 48, 110, 113. 

case, 114. 

dangerous in, drawing arms 
above head, 112. 

valvular, 117. 
hip-joint, 459. 
Hodgkin's, 132. 
kidney, 298. 
Meniere's, 405. 
Morvan's, 352. 
Pott's, 451. 
Raynaud's, 379. 
Thomsen's, 351. 

of thorax, cause of, how to as- 
certain, 145. 
Weil's, 266. 
Diseases of anus, 445, 449. 
of bladder, 437. 
blood, 128. 

of blood-vessels, 104. 
of bones, 451. 
of bronchi, 60. 
constitutional, 282. 
of ear, 403. 
of eye, 394. 
in general, 51. 
of head, 28. 

caused by, 388. 
of heart, 104. 

explanatory. 111. 

principles in treating, 111. 
infectious, 258. 
infective, Osteopathy in, 19. 
of intestines, 146. 
of joints, 451. 
of kidneys, 229. 
of liver, 194. 



INDEX. 



553 



of lungs, 60. 

of lymphatic system, 129. 

of nervous svstem, 312. 

of nose, 388, 407. 

of pancreas, 216. 

of pleurje. 60. 

of rectum, 445. 

of respiratory organs, 42, 56. 

of skin, 433. 

of spleen, 222. 

of stomach, 146. 

of throat, 3S8, 414. 

of women, 463. 

and Ostecpathy, 531. 
Dislocated, atlas not, 28. 

joints, chronic, 33. 

rib, 145. 

reducing, 153. 
Dislocation of atlas, how to re- 
duce, 360. 
reducing, (cut, 363). 

causes of, 13. 

of coccyx, how to reduce, 447. 
lumbar vertebrae, hew to re- 
duce, 470. 

not reduced, 33. 

of rib, reducing, (cut, 151). 

spinal, 338. 

reducing, (cut, 339). 
Dislocations in stomach troubles, 

145. 
Displacement of heart, 119. 
Displacements of uterus, 466. 
Disseminating tuberculosis, 84. 
Disturbance, cardiac, functional, 122. 
Divisions of, intestine, large, 139. 

small, 139. 
Dizziness. 118, 168. 
Drawing arms above head in heart 

disease, 112. 
Dripping eyes, 388, 402. 
Dropsical swellinga, 125. 
Dropsy, 45, 111. 

of abdomen, 192. 

case, 126, 127. 

of chest, 97. 

general, 125. 

of kidneys, 247. 

of larj-nx, 416. 

local, 125. 

of pericardium, 121. 
Dry catarrh, 411. 

scale, 436. 

skin, 436. 
Duct, bile-, common, 195. 

cystic, 195. 

gall-, inflammation of, 214. 
obstruction of, 214. 

thoracic. 129. 

of Wirsung, 216. 
Ducts, bile-, 195. 

ejaculatory, 510. 

hepatic, 195. 

of pancreas, 216. 
Duodenum, 219. 

Duration and frequency of pressure 
upon a nerve-center, 35. 

—35- 



Dysentery, acute, 183. 

chronic, 183. 
Dj'smenorrhea, 478. 

congestive, 478. 

membranous, 479. 

neuralgic, 478. 

obstructive, 478. 

ovarian, 479. 
Dyspepsia, 156. 
Dyspeptic glossal ulcer, 429. 
Dyspnea, paroxysmal, 60. 
Dystrophy, 436. 
Dysuria, 442. 

E 
Ear, diseases of, 388, 403. 
Earache, 403. 
Eczema, 433. 

vulvar, 496. 
Edema, laryngeal, 416. 

pulmonary, 87. 
Efferent nerve-flbers, 21. 
Effusive coxalgia, 459. 
Eighth, rib, raising, (cut, 227). 
Ejaculatory ducts, 510. 
Elephantiasis, 279. 
Embolism, cerebral, 355. 

pulmonary, 88. 
Emission of semen, 519. 
Emphysema, pulmonary, 85. 
Emprosthotonos, 376. 
Empyema, 96. 
Encephalitis, 354. 
Enchondroma, nasal, 413. 
Endocarditis, 120. 

Endocardium, inflammation cf, 120. 
Endocervicitis, 483. 
Endometritis, acute, 483. 

corporeal, chronic, 483. 
Enlarged tonsils, 388, 427. 
Enlargement of heart, 113, 118. 

of organ, 112. 

of spleen, 44, 224. 
Enteric fever, 265. 
Enteritis, acute, 167. 

chronic, 168. 
Enterocele, 503. 
Enteroptosis, 188. 
Entero-vaginal hernia, 503. 
Enuresis, 443. 
Epilepsy, 359. 
Epistaxis, 414. 
Equalize circulation, treatment to, 

114. 
Equalized, circulation by, 59. 
Equalizing circulation, 0.steopathy 
in, 20. 

nerve-wave, 56. 
Erection, 517. 

center for, 518. 

in female, 518. 

of uterus, 519. 
Erysipelas, 111, 271. 

of face, 388. 

vulvar, 497. 
Erythema, 436. 

vulvar, 497. •; 



554 



INDEX. 



Esophageal abscess, 425. 
dilatation, 426. 
stricture, 426. 
Esophagitis, acute, 424. 

chronic, 425. 
Evacuation of urine, nerves con- 
cerned in, 440. 
Evil, king's, 305. 

Examination in constipation, 150. 
first, 13. 

how to make, 37. 
in paralysis, 328. 

stomach trouble, 145. 
Excess of blood in brain, 353. 
in lungs, 85. 
in spinal cord, 335. 
uric acid, 199. 
Excessive menstruation, 476. 

sweat, 436. 
Excrescence, genital, 468. 
Excretion of feces, 143. 
Exophthalmic goiter, 368. 
Expanding chest, 59, (cuts, 63, 65, 

81), 95, 164, 166. 
Expansion of chest, 56. 
Explanatory— brain fever, 276. 
cholera morbus, 172. 
coxalgia, 459. 

diseases of eye, ear, nose, and 
throat, 388. 
of heart (and blood-vessels), 

HI. 
of kidneys, 232. 
of stomach, intestines, and 
peritoneum, 147. 
goiter, 308. 
hiccup, 323. 
liver, 198. 
lungs, 55. 
why the osteopath prefers 

chronic cases, 255. 
stomach and intestines, 144. 
Extension of neck, (cut, 77). 

of spine, (cut, 201). 
External female generative organs, 
511. 
fistula, incomplete, 450. 
Extra-meningeal hemorrhage, 337. 
Extremities, lower, coldness of, 18. 
upper, nerves to, vaso-motor.254. 
Exudative and productive nephritis, 
acute, 239. 
chronic, 240. 
Eye, diseases of, 388, 394. 
film on, 400. 

nerves to, vaso-motor, 254. 
Eyelids, granulated, 388, 394. 

inflammation of, 400. . 
Eyes, crossed, 402. 
dripping, 388, 402. 
inflammation of, 388, (cut, 395), 

397. 
sore, 28. 



Pace, erysipelas of. 
Face-worm, 436. 



Falling of womb, 466. 
Falling sickness, 359. 
Fallopian tubes, 513. 
False anchylosis, 461. 

measles, 268. 

rib, raising, (cut, 211). 
Famine, fever, 264. 
Fatty, infiltration, hepatic, 209. 

liver, 209. 
Fecal impaction, 189. 
Feces, excretion of, 143. 
Feeble action of heart, 114. 
Felon, 435. 
Female, erection in, 518. 

troubles, 298. 
Femoral coxalgia, 459. 
Fertilization of ovum, 519. 
Fetus, 520. 

changes after birth, 522. 

circulation in, 520. 

movements of, 521. 

nourishment of, 520. 

organs, of, secretory, 521. 
Fever, ardent, 256. 

bladder, 436. 

brain, 276. 

catarrhal, 259. 

cerebro-spinal, 262. 

childbed, 536. 

continued, simple, 258. 

control, how to, 43. 

controlled by, 59. 

enteric, 265. 

famine, 264. 

hay, 260. 

jail, 264. 

lung, 88. 

malarial, 261. 

miliary, 279. 

puerperal, 536. 

rag-weed, 260. 

rheumatic, 284. 

scarlet, 267. 

spurious, 268. 

ship, 264. 

splenic, 280. 

spotted, 262. 

thermic, 257. 

typhoid, 19, 265. 

typhus, 264. 

yellow, 266. 
Fevers, 258. 

Fibers, nerve-, afferent, 21. 
efferent, 21. 
function of, 21. 
motor, 21. 
sensory, 21. 

vaso-motor, 21. 
Fibrinous bronchitis, 80. 
Fibroid tumor, uterine, 485. 
Fibroma, nasal, 413. 
Fibrosis, arterio-capillary, 122. 
Film on eye, 400. 
First examination, 13. 
Fissure, anal, 450. 
Fistula in ano, 449. 

complete, 449. 



INDEX. 



555 



incomplete, external, 450. 
internal, 450. 
recto-vaginal, 500. 
vesico-vaginal, 500. 
Fits, 359. 

Flesh on leg, rotating, (cut, 287). 
Flesh-worm disease, 280. 
Fleshy tumors, 310. 
Flexions, compound, 473. 
Flexure, sigmoid, 154. 
Floating kidney, 251. 

spleen, 226. 
Flow of blood, free, 18. 
Fluid in peritoneal cavity, 192. 
Flux, 183, 328. 

bloody, 146. 
Follicles, Graafian, 515. 

lymph-, 130. 
Follicular tonsillitis, 426. 

vulvitis, 494. 
Foot-and-mouth disease, 281. 
Force, nerve-, coordination of, 11, 20. 
Force-pump illustration, 18. 
Free circulation of blood, 11, 16, 18. 
intercostal nerves, how to, 
163. 
Freeing circulation, 166, (outs, 331, 
379). 
to head, 84. 
to leg, 203. 
blood-supply, 56. 
nerve-wave, 56. 

pneumogastric nei've, 155, 160, 
(cut, 161). 
French measles, 268. 
Frequency and duration of pressure 
upon a nerve-center, 35. 
of treating acute cases, 32. 
chronic cases, 32. 
Friedreich's disease, 348. 
Function of blof)d-ccrpu3cles, white, 
19. 
of glands, 14. 
of nerve-fibers, 21. 
nutritive, under supervision of, 

22. 
perverted, 42. 
of spinal cord, 22. 
of spleen, 223. 
Functional disturbance, cardiac, 122. 
Functions of liver. 1.50, 198. 
Fundus of stomach, 133. 

of uterus, 452. 
Furuncles, 436. 

G 

Gall-bladder, 196. 

inflammation of, 213. 
Gall-duct, inflammation of, 214. 

obstruction pf, 214. 
Gall-stone in intestine, 189. 
ri-all-stones, 214. 

Ganglion, Gasserian, (cut. 409.) 
Gaglionic plexus, Auerbach's, 136. 
Gangrene, pulmonary, 88. 

symmetrical, 370. 



Gangrenous pharyngitis, 422. 
stomatitis, 431. 
vulvitis, 495. 
Gastralgia, 160. 
Gastrectasia, 163. 
Gastric carcinoma, 164. 
neurosis, 165. 
ulcer, 164. 
vertigo, 166. 
Gastritis, acute, 156. 

chronic, 156. 
Gathered breasts, 532. 
General debility, 282. 
dropsy, 125. 
treatment, 32, 35, 306. 
of neck, 393. 
Generative organs, female, 511. 

male, 507. 
Genital excrescence, 468. 
Gland, prostate, 507. 
thyroid, 308. 

vulvo-vaginal, abscess of, 495. 
cyst of, 495. 
Glanders, 281. 
iJlands of Bartholin, 512. 
Cowper's, 507. 
function of, 14. 
lymph-, 130. 

compound, 130. 
simple, 130. 
Glandular activity, 11, 14. 
Glans penis, 509. 
Slisson's capsule, inflammation of, 

213. 
Glossal ulcer, 429. 
Glossanthrax, 429. 
Glossitis, 428. 
Glossophytia, 429. 
Goiter, 45. 

exophthalmic, 368. 
simple, 308. 
Cout, acute, 303. 
chronic, 305. 
in neck, 424. 
rheumatism, 303. 
Graafian follicles, 515. 

vesicles, 515. 
Granular lids, 394. 

vaginitis, 491. 
Granulated, eyelids, 388, 394. 
Grave's disease, 368. 
Great sciatic, 329. 
Green sickness, 128. 
Hrippe, 259. 
Guessing, 259. 
Gynecology, 463. 

H 

Hay asthma, 260. 

Hay fever, 260. 

Head, circulation to, freeing, 84. 

cold in the, 407. 

diseases of the, 28. 
caused by, 388. 

pain in, 315. 

roaring in, 388, 406. 



556 



TNDEX. 



Headache, 18, (cut, 313), 315, (cut, 317). 
holding vaso-motor in, (cut, 319). 
nervous, 321. 
sick, 321. 
Healthy tissue, how maintained, 41. 

produced, 41. 
Heart, 104, (cut, 107). 

action of, deranged, 122. 
feeble. 114. 
irregular, IS. 
too rapid, 116, 119. 
cavities of, blood in, coagulation 

of, 121. 
disease, 33, 42, 44, 45, 48, 110, 113. 
dangerous in, drawing arms 

above head, 112. 
valvular, 117. 
diseases of, 104. 

principles in treating. 111. 
displacement of, 119. 
enlargement of, 113, 118. 
innervation of, 105. 
neuralgia of, 120. 
shape of, abnormal, 119. 
structure of, abnormal, 199. 
trouble. 159. 

organic, 111. 
Hematocele, pelvic, 505. 

pudendal, 504. 
Hematomyelia, 343. 
Hematuria, 234. 
Hemiplegia, 326. 
infantile, 356. 
Hemoglobinuria, 235. 
paroxysmal, 245. 
Hemophilia, 308. 
Hemorrhage, cerebral, 354. 
of nose, 414. 
ovarian, 488. 
pudendal, 505. 
of spinal cord, 343. 
uterine, 477. 
Hemorrhoids, 446. 
Hemothorax. 97. 
Hepatic abscess, 208. 
artery, 196. 
branches, 196. 
amyloid degeneration, 210. 
carcinoma, 210. 
cells, 144. 
cirrhosis, 209. 
colic, 215 
congestion, 207. 
ducts, 195. 

fatty infiltrati-?n, 209. 
hydatid cyst, 210. 
Hepatitis, acute, 207. 
Hereditary ataxia, 348. 
Hernia, entero-vagiral, 503. 
pudendal, 504. 
recto-vaginal, 503. 
vaginal, 503. 
vesico-vaginal, 503. 
Herpes zoster, 436. 
Herpetic sore throat, 427. 

tonsillitis, 428. 
Hiccup, 323. 



Hide-bound, 436. 
Hip-joint, arthritis in, 457. 

disease, 459. 
Hodgkin's disease, 132. 
Holding phrenic, (cut, 99). 

splanchnic, (cut, 179). 

vaso-motor, (cuts, 101, 319). 
Humpback, 452. 
Hydatid cyst, hepatic, 210. 
renal, 249. 
splenic, 225. 
Hydrarthrosis, 460. 
Hydrocephalus, 366. 
Hydronephrosis, 247. 
Hydropericardium, 121. 
Hydrophobia, 279. 
Hydrothorax, 97. 
Hymen, 512. 
Hyperemia, 353. 

neuro-paralytic, 325. 

spinal, 335. 
Hyperesthesia, vulvar, 497. 
Hyperidrosis, 436. 
Hyperplasia, areolar, 482. 
Hypertrophic, pseudo-, muscular 
paralysis, 349. 

rhinitis, chronic, 408. 
Hypertrophy, cardiac, 118. 

cervical, 484 

interstitial, diffuse, 482. 

splenic, 224. 
Hysteria, 368. 



Icterus. 204. 

Idiopathic muscular atrophy, sim- 
ple, 350. 
rhinorrhea, 413. 
Idiosyncratic coryza, 260. 
Illustration, force-pump, IS. 
Impaction, fecal, 189. 
Impetigo, 436. 
Impotency, 384, (cut, 385). 
Important nerve-centers, 22. 
Inability to sleep. 382. 
Inadequacy, renal. 232. 
Incompetency, valvular, 117. 
Incomplete anchylosis, 461. 

fistula, external, 450. 
internal, 450. 
Incontinence of urine, 413. 
Increase of movement of small in- 
testine by, 140. 
Increasing peristaltic action, 167. 
Indigestion, 156. 
Induration of lungs, 85 
Infantile hemiplegia, 356. 
Infectious diseases. 258. 
Infective diseases. Osteopathy in, 19. 

processes, 19. 
Inflammation of bladder, 441. 

brain, 276, 354. 

bronchi, 83. 

bronchia, 79. 

bronchial tubes, 75. 

cardiac muscular tissue, 121. 

cecum, 187. 



IXDEX. 



557 



conjunctiva, 39S. 
cornea, 399. 
endocardium, 120. 
esophagus, 424. 
eyes. 3SS, (cut, 395), 397. 
eyelids. 400. 
gall-bladder, 213. 
gall-duct, 214. 
Glisson's capsule, 213. 
intestine, small, 167. 
iris, 399. 

lachrymal sac, 400. 
liver, 207. 
lung tissue, SS. 
lungs, 83. 
nerve, 324. 
ovary, 488. 
pancreas, 21S. 
pericardium, 120. 
peritoneum, 190. 
pleurae, 90. 
rectum, 445. 
sclera. 399. 
spinal cord, 342. 
spleen, 223. 
tongue, 42S. 
• trachea, 423. 
vein, 124. 

vermiform appendix, 184. 
Inflammatory coxalgia, 459. 
processes, IS. 
rheumatism, 42, 111. 
Influence, nerve-, on intestines, 140. 
on kidneys, 231. 
on rectum, 143. 
on stomach, 136. 
Influenza, 259. 

Inhibitory centers of stomach, 137. 
Injured by Osteopathy, 43. 
Inner\-ation of heart, 105. 
Insane, paralysis of, 358. 
Insanity, 3-58. 
Insolation, 257. 
Insomnia, 382. 
Instant cures. 37. 
Insufiicient menstruation, 476. 
Intercostal muscles, pain in, 97. 
stretching, 95. 
nerves, free, how to, 163. 
neuralgia, 97. 
Internal fistula, incomplete, 430. 
Interstitial cystitis, 441. 

hypertrophy, diffuse, 482. 
nephritis, chronic, 248. 
pneumonitis, 85. 
Intestinal amyloid degeneration, 190. 
carcinoma, 189. 
catarrh, 16S. 
obstruction, 189. 
parasites, 190. 
tuberculosis, 190. 
Intestine, large. 139. 
small, 1.39. 

inflammation of, 167. 
Intestines. 13S. 

diseases of, 146. 
movements of, 139. 



nerve-influence or, 140. 

nerves to, vaso-motor, 254. 
Intracranial aneurism, 366. 
Intussusception, 188. 
Inversion, 466, 467, 474. 
Iritis, 399. 
Itch, baker's, 436. 

barber's, 436. 
Itching, 436. 

J 
Jail fever, 264. 
Jaundice, 204. 
catarrhal, 214. 
hematogenous, 204. 
hepatogenous, 204. 
malignant, 207. 
Jaw, lock-, 376. 

lump-, 281. 
Joint, arthritis in, of arm, 457. 
hip-. 457. 
of leg, 45S. 
shoulder, 457 
hip-, disease, 459. 
Joints, diseases of, 451. 

dislocated, chronic, 33. 
June cold, 260. 

K 

Keratitis, parenchymatous, diffuse, 
399. 

phlyctenular, acute, 399. 
Kidney, abscess of, 250. 

disease, 298. 

floating, 251. 

trouble, 156. 

tumor of. 249. 
Kidneys, 229. 

blood in, excess of, 238. 

blood-vessels, 230. 

cancer of. 249. 

consumption of, 249. 

diseases of, 229. 

dropsy of, 247. 

nerve-influence on, 231. 

nerves, 230. 

relations, 229. 
King's evil, 305. 

Kneading bowels, 154, (cut, 157). 
Knowledge of osteopath, 12. 
Kj-phosis, 452. 



Labia majora, 511. 

minora, 511. 
Labor, 522. 

abdominal muscles in, 525. 
arrangement of bed in, 526. 
changes in organs during, 523. 
descent of uterus in, 522. 
dilatation of cervix, 524. 

of vagina, .525. 
effect of. on mother, 525. 
indications of, 523. 
management in, stage, first, 526. 

second, 529. 

third, 530. 



558 



INDEX. 



secretions in, 522. 

stages in, 522. 

stage, first, 523. 
second, 524. 
third, 525. 

treatment in, stage, first, 527. 
second, 527. 
third, 530. 

uterine contractions in, 523. 
Laceration, cervical, 485. 
Lachrymal sac, inflammation of, 

400. 
La grippe, 259. 
Land scurvy, 311. 
Large intestine, 139. 
Larger lymphatics, 129. 
Laryngismus stridulus, 418. 
Laryngeal catarrh, 414. 

edema, 416. 

syphilis, 421. 

tumor, 420. 
Laryngitis, acute, 414. 

chronic, 416. 

diphtheritic, 415. 

phles-monous, 418. 

pseudo-membranous, 419. 

submucous, 417. 

tuberculous, 417. 
Laryngospasm, 418. 
Larynx, dropsy of, 416. 

neurosis of, 418. 
Lateral sclerosis, ametrophic, 349. 
primary, 348. 

spinal curvature, 452. 
Tjateroflexion, 473. 
Lead poisoning, 381. 
Leg, circulation to, freeing, 56. 

flesh on, rotating, (cut, 287). 

joint of, arthritis in, 458. 

milk-, 532. 535. 
Leprosy, 279. 
Lesions, 11. 
Leucocytes, 19, 130. 
Leucocythemia, 131. 
Leucoma, 401. 
Leucorrhea, 480. 
Leukemia, 131. 

pseudo-, 132. 
Leukoplakia lingualis, 429. 
Lever, arm as, 153. 
Levers, arms as, 59. 
Lichen, 436. ' 
Lids, granular, 394. 
"Life, change of," 505. 
Ligaments of bladder, 438. 

of ovaries, 514. 

round, 514. 

of uterus, 452. 
Lipuria, 235. 
Lithemia, acute, 199, (cut, 205). 

chronic, 204. 
Liver, 149, 194. 

abscess of, 208. 

action of, starting, 149. 
weakened, 149. 

blood supply, 149. 

blood-vessels, 196. 



cancer of, 210. 

capsule, 194. 

cells, 194. 

complaint, 156. 

degeneration of, 210. 

diseases of, 194. 

fatty, 209. 

functions, 150, 198. 

inflammation of, 207. 

lobules, 194. 

nerves, 197. 

stimulating, 203. 

torpid, 146, 199. 

waxy, 249. 
Lobes, of lung, 51. 
Lobules of liver, 194. 
Local asphyxia, 370. 

dropsy, 125. 
Lock-jaw, 376. 

Locomotor ataxia, 344, (cut, 345) . 
Lordosis, 452. 
Loss of sexual power, 384. 
Lower extremities, coldness of, 18. 
Lumbago, 297. (cut, 299). 
Lumbar vertebree, dislocation of, 

how to reduce, 470. 
Lumbricoides, 190. 
Lump-jaw, 281. 
Lung fever, 88. 

tissue, inflammation of, 88. 

trouble. 67, 75, 159. 
Lungs, 51 (cut, 107). 

air-cells of, dilatation of, 85. 

apex, 51. 

blood in, excess of, 85. 

blood-vessels of, 53. 

border, anterior, 52. 
posterior, 52. 

cells of, 53. 

diseases of, 60. 

induration of, 85. 

inflammation of, 83. 

lobes of, 51. 

lymphatics of, 55. 

mortification of, 88. 

nerve-supply, 55. 

nerA'es to, vaso-motor, 254. 

root, 52. 

substance of, 53. 

surface, external, 52. 
inner, 52. 

tubes of, 53. 
Lymph, amount of, 130. 

follicles, 130. 

glands, 130. 

compound, 130. 
simple, 130. 
Lymphadenoma, 132. 
Lymphatic and capillary systems 
compared, 130. 

circulation, 129. 

glands, 130. 

system, diseases of, 129. 

trunk, right. 129. 
Lymphatics, 129. 

function of, 130. 

larger, 129. 



IXDEX. 



559 



M 

Machine, man as a, 44. 
Maggot-pimple, 436. 
Maintenance of tiealthy tissue, 41. 
Major, pectoralis, 61, 153. 
Malarial fever, 261. 
Malformation, cardiac, 119. 

uterine, 481. 
Male generative organs, 507. 
Malignant jaundice, 207. 
Management of child, 529. 

in labor, 526. 
Mania, puerperal, 537. 
Manipulation of muscles, 36, 59. 
Massage, 29. 
Mastitis, 523. 
Measles, 268. 
bastard, 268. 
false, 268. 
French, 268. 
Meatus urinarius, 512. 
Mechanical stimuli, 23. 
Medicine on its journey, following a 

dose of, 285. 
Media, otitis, catarrhal, acute. 403. 

chronic, 405. 
Megrim, 322. 
Melanopathia, 436. 
Membranous croup, 419. 
dysmenorrhea, 479. 
pseudo-, laryngitis, 419. 
Meniere's disease, 405. 
Meningitis, cerebral, 354. 
tubercular, 354. 
cerebro-spinal, 262. 
spinal, acute, 335. 
chronic, 336. 
Menopause, 505. 
Menorrhagia, 476. 
Menses, cessation of, final, 505. 
Menstruation, 516. 
absence of, 475. 
insufficient, 476. 
painful, 478. 
uterus during, 466. 
Mercurial stomatitis, 432. 
Metamorphosis, retrograde, 17. 
Metritis, acute, 481. 

chronic, 482. 
Metrorrhagia, 477. 
Microbes, 19. 
Microorganism, 19. 
Micturition, 439. 
difficult, 444. 
painful, 444. 
Midwifery, 507. 
Migraine, 322. 
Miliary fever, 279. 

tuberculosis, acute, 84. 
Milk-leg, 532, 535. 
Milk-sickness, 280. 
Misplacement of an organ, 112. 
Moist tetter, 433. 
Mons veneris, 511. 
Morbilli, 268. 
Morbus, cholera, 171, 328. 



explanatory, 172. 
case, 177. 
Mortification of lungs, 88. 
Morvan's disease, 352. 
Mother, effect of labor on, 525. 
Motor nerve-fibers, 21. 
Mouth, sore, nursing, 432. 
Movements of fetus, 521. 
intestines, 139. 

small intestine increased by,140. 
stomach, 134. 
Multiple neuritis. 325. 
Mumps, 270, 388. 
Muscles, 30, 44. 

abdominal, in labor, 525. 
abductor, stretching, 203. 
cervical, spasms of, 424. 
of chest, contraction of, 44. 
in constipation, 148. 

relaxing contracted, 149. 
contraction of, 29, 30, 153. 
intercostal, pain in, 97. 

stretching, 95. 
manipulation cf, 36, 59. 
of neck, contracted, causes, 388- 

contraction of, 227. 
shrinking of, 333. 
in stomach trouble, 145. 
Muscular atrophy, arthritic, 359. 
simple idiopathic, 350. 
progressive, 349. 
paralysis, pseudo-hypertrophic, 

349. 
rheumatism, acute, 295. 

chronic. 296. 
tissre, cardiac, inflammati '^ 121. 
Myelitis, acute, 342. 

chronic, 343. 
Myocarditis, 121. 
Myopy, 402. 
^lyotonia congenita, 351. 

N 
Names, not, but conditions, 56. 
Nasal calculus, 412. 

carcinoma, 413. 

catarrh, acute, 407. 

enchondroma, 413. 

fibroma, 413. 

osteoma, 413. 

polypi, 412. 

post-, rhinitis, clircnic, 411. 

sarcoma, 413. 

tumors, 413. 

ulcers, 413. 
Nausea, overcome by, 138. 
Near-sightedness, 402. 
Neck, extension of, (cut, 77). 

general treatment of, 393. 

gout in, 424. 

stiff, 296. 

treatment of, (cuts, 389, 391). 
Nematodes, 190. 
Neoplasm, vesical, 442. 
Nephritis, exudative and prcduct- 
tive, acute, 239. 
chronic, 240. 



560 



INDEX. 



interstitial, chronic, 24S. 
Nephrolithiasis, 247. 
Nerve, a, 20. 

inflammation of a, 324. 

phrenic, holding, (cut, 99). 
pressure, 98. 

pneumogastric, 174. 

freeing, 155, 160, (cut, 161). 
stimulating, 84, (cut, 161). 

sciatic, stretch, how to, 329 

splanchnic, holding, (cut, 179) 
pressure on, 145. 
right, 174. 
stimulating, 154. 

sympathetic, (cut, 141). 

tumor of a, 324. 
Nerve-centers, important, 22. 

by knowledge of, 23. 

pressure "upon a, duration and 
frequency of, 35. 
Nerve-fibers, afferent, 21. 

efferent. 21. 

function of, 21. 

motor, 21. 

sensory, 21. 
Nerve-force, coordiration cf, 11, 20. 
Nerve-influence on intestines, 140. 

kidneys, 231. 

rectum, 143. 

stomach, 136. 
Nerve-supply of lungs, 55. 
Nerve-wave, equalizing, 56. 
Nerves, 48. 

of bladder, 438. 

intercostal, free, how to, 163. 

of kidneys, 230 
liver, 197. 

pancreas, 217. 

spinal, 22. 

splanchnic, 21. 

splenic, 223. 

of stomach, 135. 

urine, concerned in evacuation 
of, 440. 
retention of, 440. 

of uterus, 465. 
Nervous debility, 367. 

headache, 321. 

prostration, 367. 

system, 327 

diseases of, 312. 
Neuralgia, 45, 312. 

of heart, 120. 

intercostal, 97. 

of stomach, 160. 
Neuritis, 324. 

multiple, 325. 
Neuro-paralytic, hyperemia. 325. 
Neuromata, 324. 
Neurosis, gastric, 165. 

of larynx, 418. 
Nigrities, 429. 
Noma, 431. 
Nose, diseases of, 388, 407. 

polypus of, 888, 412. 

stone in, 411. 
Nose-bleed, 414. 



Nourishment of fetus, 520. 
Nursing sore mouth, 432. 
Nutritive function, under supervi- 
sion of, 22. 

O 

Obstetrical cases, 528. 
Obstetrics, 507. 

and Osteopathy, 531. 
Obstruction to circulation. 111. 

of gall-duct, 214. 

intestinal, 189. 

of pylorus, 163. 

to splanchnic, 149. 
Obstructive, dysmenorrhea, 478. 
Occlusion of vagina, 503. 
Oligomenorrhea, 476. 
Opacity of cornea, 401. 
Opening, cardiac, 133. 

centers of stomach, 136. 
Opisthotonos, 376. 

an, enlargement of an, 112. 

misplacement of an, 112. 
Organs, changes in, during labor, 
523. 

digestive, in constipaticn com- 
pared, 148. 

generative, male, 507. 
female, 511. 

respiratory, diseases of, 42. 

of respiration, diseases of, treat- 
ment of, 56. 

secretory, of fetus, 521. 
Organic heart trouble. 111. 
Orifice of vagina, 512. 
(Osteoma, nasal, 413. 
Osteopath, knowledge of, 12. 
Osteopathic desensitization, 23. 

principles, four great, 43. 

treatment, frequency of, 43. 
strength of, 112, 116. 
time required, 43. 
Osteopathy, 9. 40. 

in equalizing circulation, 20. 

how to apply, 34. 

in infective diseases, 19. 

injured by, 43. 

in a nutshell, 31. 

principles of, cardinal, 11. 

translation of, 10. 

triumph of, 531. 
Ostitis, 451. 
Otitis media, catarrhal, acute, 403. 

chronic, 405. 
Otomyces, 406. 
Otoncus, 406. 
Otopyosis, 406. 
Otorrhagia, 406. 
Ovarian dysmenorrhea, 479. 

hemorrhage, 488. 

prolapsus, 489. 

tumor, 489. 
0"vaiies, 513. 

ligaments of, 514. 
Ovaritis, 488. 
Oviducts, 513. 
Ovisacs, 515. 



INDEX. 



561 



Ovum, discharge of, 516. 

fertilization of, 519. 
Oxaluria, 237. 
Oxyuris vermicularis, 190. 
Ozena, 412. 



Pachymeningitis, cervical, 336. 
Pain in head, 315. 

in intercostal muscles, 97, 

sun-, 322. 
Painful menstruation, 478. 

micturition, 444. 
Pains in chest, 33. 

colicky, checking, 167. 

in side, 33. 
Palsy, 326. 

shaking, 357. 
Panaris, analgesic, 352. 
Panaritium, 435. 
Pancreas, action of, starting, 149. 

blood-vessels, condition of, 216. 

capsule, 216. 

diseases of, 216. 

ducts, 216. 

inflammation or, 218. 

nerves, 217. 

secretion, 217. 
Pancreatic cyst, 221. 
Pancreatitis, acute, 218. 

suppurative, 221. 
Pannus, 401. 
Paralysis, 326. 

agitans, 357. 

ascending, acute, 352. 

bulbar, 357. 

glosso-labio-laryngeal, 357. 

of insane, 358. 

muscular, pseudo-hypertrophic, 
349. 

of vaso-motor, causes, 225. 
Paralytic, neuro-, hyperemia, 325. 
Paraplegia, 326. 

ataxic, 348. 

spastic, congenital, 348. 
primary, 347. 
Parasites, intestinal, 190. 
Parasitic stomatitis, 431. 
Parenchymatous keratitis, diffuse, 
399. 

tonsillitis, 427. 
Paresis, 326. 
Paretic dementia, 358. 
Paronychia, 435. 
Parotiditis, 270. 
Parovarian cyst, 490. 
Paroxysmal dyspnea, 60. 

hemoglobinuria, 245. 
Parturition center, 22. 
Pectoralis major, 61, 153. 
Pectoris, angina, 120. 
Pelvic cellulitis, 500. 

hematocele, 505. 

peritonitis, acute, 498. 
chronic, 499. 
Pemphigus, 436. 
Penis, 508. 



glans, 509. 
Pericarditis, 120. 
Pericardium, dropsy of, 121. 

inflammation of, 120. 
Perichondritis, 418. 
Perihepatitis, 213. 
Periodic vaso-motor coryza, 260. 
Perirenal abscess, 251. 
Peristalsis, 135, 139. 

during sleep, 140. 
Peristaltic action, 173. 

checking, 167, 168. 
controlled by, 174. 
increasing, 167. 
weakened, 149. 
Peritoneal carcinoma, 192. 

cavity, fluid in, 192. 

tuberculosis, 193. 
Peritoneum, cancer of, 192. 

inflammation of, 190. 
Peritonitis, acute, 190. 

chronic, 192. 

pelvic, acute, 498. 
chronic, 499. 
Perityphlitis, 187. 
Pertussis, 209. 
Perverted function, 41. 
Pharyngeal, retro-, abscess, 422. 
Pharyngitis, acute, 421. 

chronic, 422. 

gangrenous, 422. 
Pharnyx, catarrh in, 411. 
Phlebitis, 124. 
Phlegmasia, 535. 
Phlegmonous laryrj-itis, 418. 

vulvitis, 493. 
Phlyctenular conjunctivitis, 398. 

keratitis, acute, 399. 
Phrenic nerve, holding, (cut, 99). 

pressure upon, 98. 
Phrenitis, 354. 
Physic for constipation, 149. 
Piles, 446. 

Pimple, maggot-. 436. 
Pimples, 434. 
Pityriasis, 436. 
Placenta, deliver, how to, 530. 

detachment of, 525. 
Pleura, inflammation of, 90. 
Pleurae, diseases of, 60. 
Pleural cavity, air in, 90. 
Pleurisy, 67. 

acute, 90. 

chronic, 96. 

diaphragmatic, 98. 
Pleurodynia, 97. 
Pleurothotonos, 376. 
Plexus, brachial, (cut, 373). 

cardiac, 105. 

ganglionic, Auerbach's, 136. 

solar, 146, 174. 

pressure upon, 167. 
Plumbism, 381. 
Pneumogastric nerve, 174. 

freeing, 155, 160, (cut, 161). 

pressure on, 174. 

right, 174. 

stimulating, 84, (cut, 161). 



562 



INDEX. 



Pneumonia, catarrhal, 83. 

croupous, 88. 
Pneumonitis, broncho-, 83. 

interstitial, 85. 
Pneumothorax, 90. 
Poisoning, lead, 381. 
Poisons, 149. 

Poliomyelitis, anterior, 343. 
Polypi, nasal, 412. 
Polypus of nose, 388, 412. 

uterine, 486. 
Polyuria, 241. 
Portal vein, 196. 

branches, 197. 
Posterior spinal curvature, 452. 

sclerosis, 344. 
Post-nasal rhinitis, chronic, 411. 
Pott's disease, 451. 
Power, sexual, loss of, 384. 
Pox, chiclcen-, 271. 

small-, 270. 
Preg-nancy, dangerous treatments 
during, 33. 

signs, of, 522. 
Pressing rib on splanchnic in con- 
stipation, 148. 
Pressure on an artery. 111. 

of hand cures, 328. 

on a nerve-center, duration and 
frequency of, 35. 

on phrenic nerve, 98. 

on splanchnic center, 156. 

on splanchnic nerve, 145. 

on splanchnics, 150. 

on solar plexus; 167. 

on vaso-motor, 59. 

on a vein. 111. 
Primary lateral sclerosis, 348. 

spastic paraplegia, 347. 
Principles, osteopathic, four great, 
43. 

of Osteopathy, cardinal, 11. 

in treating diseases of heart, 111. 
Processes, infective, 19. 

inflammatory, 18. 
Procidentia, 466. 
Proctitis, 445. 

Production of healthy tissue, 41. 
Productive, exudative and, nephri- 
tis, acute, 239. 
chronic, 240. 
Progressive muscular atrophy, 349. 
Prolapse, 467. 
Prolapse of vagina, 467. 
Prolapsus, 466, 474. 

ani, 448. 

ovarian, 489. 

urethrse, 502. 

uteri, 474. 

vaginae, 503. 
Prostate gland, 507. 
Prostration, nervous, 367. 
Pruritus vulvse, 498. 
Pseudo-hypertrophic muscular par- 
alysis, 349. 
Pseudo-leukemia, 132. 
Pseudo-membranous laryngitis, 419. 
Psoriasis, 436. 



Pterygium, 400. 
Ptyalism, 432. 
Puberty, 516. 

uterus at, 465. 
Pudendal hematocele, 504. 

hemorrhage, 505. 

hernia, 504. 
Puerperal fever, 536. 

mania, 537. 

septicemia, 536. 
Pulmonary abscess, 87. 

artery, 53. 

capillaries, 54. 

congestion, 85. 

edema, 87. 

embolism, 88. 

emphysema, 85. 

gangrene, 88. 

thrombosis, 88. 

tuberculosis, 68. 

veins, 54. 
Pump, force-, illustration, 18. 
Purblindness, 402. 
Purgation, 147. 
Purples, the, 311* 
Purpura, 311. 
Putrid bronchitis, 60. 

sore throat, 422. 
Pyelitis, 246. 
Pylorus, 133. 

center for contraction, 137. 

contraction of, arrested by, 136. 
caused by, 136. 

obstruction of, 163. 

open, how to, 159. 
Pyuria, 236. 



Questions and answers, 40. 
Quincy, 427. 

Rabies, 279. 
Rachitis. 454. 
Ragweed fever, 260. 
Raising clavicle, (cut, 371). 

rib, (cut, 91). 

eighth, (cut, 227). 

ribs, (cut, 93). 

depressed, (cut, 69). 
false, (cut, 211). 
Rapid action of heart, too, 116, 119. 
Rash, 433. 

Raynaud's disease, 379. 
Rectal carcinoma, 448. 

ulcer, 448. 
Rectocele, 503. 
Recto-vaginal fistula, 500. 

hernia, 503. 
Rectum, cancer of, 448. 

diseases of, 445. 

inflammation of, 445. 

nerve-influence on, 143. 
Reception of semen, 519. 
Red corpuscles, deficiency of, 128. 
Reduced, dislocation not, 33. 
Reducing dislocation of atlas, (cut, 
363). 



INDEX. 



ses 



of rib, (cut, 151), 153. 
spinal, (cut, 339). 
Relaxation, 466. 

Relaxing contracted muscles in con- 
stipation, 149. 
Relieving difficult breathing, 164. 
Removal of cause, 12. 
Renal abscess, 250. 

amyloid degeneration, 249. 

calculus, 247. 

carcinoma, 249. 

congestion, 238. 

hydatid cyst, 249. 

inadequacy, 232. 

tuberculosis, 249. 
Respiratory organs, diseases of, 42. 

treatment of, 56. 
Retention of urine, 442. 

nerves concerned in, 440. 
Retro-pharyngeal abscess, 423. 
Retroflexion, 466, 468, 473. 
Retrograde metamorphosis, 17. 
Retroversion, 466, 467, 472. 
Rheum, salt-, 433. 
Rheumatic fever, 284. 

gout, 303. 
Rheumatism, 45. 

acute, 284. 

in arm, (cut, 291). 

articular, acute, 284. 
chronic, 294. 
subacute, 294. 

inflammatory, 11, 42. 

muscular, acute, 295. 
chronic, 296. 

sciatic, 297, (cut, 301). 
Rheumatoid arthritis, 308. 
Rhinitis, acute, 407. 

atrophic,' 412. 

diphtheritic, 411. 

hypertrophic, chronic, 408. 

post-nasal, chronic, 411.' 

sycca, 411. 
Rhinolith, 412. 
Rhinorrhea, idiopathic, 413. 
Rib, dislocated, 145. 

reducing, (cut, 151), 153. 

pressing on splanchnic in consti- 
pation, 148. 

raising a, (cut, 91). 
>. eighth, (cut, 227). 

set, how to, 150. 

turned, 150, 1.53. 
Ribs, 60. 

in normal condition, 150. 

raising the, (cut, 93). 
depressed, (cut, 69). 
false, (cut, 211). 
Rickets, 454. 
Ring-worm, 436. 
Roaring in head, 388, 406. 
Rose cold, 260. 
Roseola, 268. 

Rotating flesh on leg, (cut, 287). 
Rotheln, 268. 
Round ligaments, 514. 
Round-worms, 190. 



Rubella, 268. 
Running tetter, 433. 
Rupture of aorta, 122. 

of blood-vessels in skull, 366. 



Sac, lachrymal, inflammation of. 

400. 
Salivation, 432. 
Salpingitis, 487. 
Salt-rheum, 433. 
Sarcoma, nasal, 413. 

uterine, 487. 
Scald-head, 433. 
Scale, dry, 436. 
Scan, crusted, 436. 

washerwoman's, 436. 
3ca!ly tetter, 436. 
Scarlatina, 267. 
Scarlet fever, 267. 

spurious, 268. 
Sciatic nerve, great, 329. 

stretch, how to, 329. 

rheumatism, (cut, 301). 
Sciatica, 297. 
iScleritis, 399. 
Scleroderma, 436. 
Sclerosis, cerebro-spinal, 3.56. 

lateral, amyotrophic, 349. 
primary, 348. 

spinal posterior, 344. 
Scoliosis, 452. 
Scorbutus, 310. 
Scrofula, 305. 
Scrotum, .509. 
Scurvy, 310. 

land, 311. 
Secretion of pancreas, 217. 
Secretions, 14. 

in labor, 522. 
Secretory orgars of fetus, 521. 
Semen, emission of, 519. 

reception of, 519. 
Seminales, vesiculte, 510. 
Sensory nerve-fibers, 21. 
Septicemia, puerperal, 536. 
Set rib, how to, 150. 
Sexual power, loss of, 384. 
Shaking palsy, 357. 
Shingles, 436. 
Ship fever, 264. 
Short-sightedness. 402. 
Shoulder-joint, arthritis in, 457. ' 
Shrinking of muscles, 333. 
Rick headache, 321. 
Sickness, falling-, 359. 

green, 128. 
■ milk-, 280. 

swamp-, 280. 
Side, pains in, 33. 
Sigmoid flexure, 154. 
Singultus, 323. 
Skeleton, (cut, 46). , 

adjustment, 11, 12. 

bones of, 46. 
Skin, diseases of, 433. 

dry. 436. 



564 



INDEX. 



of trunk, nerves to, vaso-motor, 
254. 
Skull, blood-vessels in, rupture of. 
366. 
water in, 366. 
Sleep, inability to, 382. 

peristalsis during, 140. 
Small intestine, 139. 

inflammation of, 167. 
movements nf, increased by, 140. 
Small-pox, 270. 
Softening, cerebral, acutC', 355. 

chronic, 356. 
Solar plexus, 146, 174. 

pressure on, 167. 
Sore eyes, 28. 

mouth, nursing, 432. 
throat, 421. 

herpetic, 428. 
putrid, 422. 
Spasmodic croup, 420. 
Spasms of cervical muscles,_ 424. 
Spastic paraplegia, congenital, 348. 

primary, 347. 
Specific' vaginitis, 492. 
Spermatic cord, 510. 
Spinal anemia, 334. 

cerebro-, fever, 262. 
meningitis. 262. 
sclerosis, 357. 
system, 21. 
column, temperature in, abnor- 
mal, 153. 
compression, 337. 
cord, function of, 22. 
hemorrhage of, 343. 
inflammation of, 342. 
curvature, 452. 
anterior, 452. 
lateral, 452. 
posterior, 452. 
dislocation, 338. 
hyperemia, 335. 
meningitis, acute, 335. 

chronic, 336. 
nerves, 22. 
ostitis, 4.51. 

sclerosis, posterior, 344. 
treatment, (cut, 73). 
tumor, 341. 
Spine, 328. 

extension of, (cut, 201). 
Splanchnic center, pressure on, 156. 
nerve, 140, 174, 254. 
great, 174. 
holding, (cut, 173). 
pressure on, 145, 150. 

right, 174. 
stimulating, 136, 154. 
nerves, 21. 
Spleen, 222. 

blood-vessels of, 223. 
diseases of, 222. 
enlargement of, 44, 224. 
floating, 226. 
function of, 223. 
inflammation of, 223. 



nerves of, 223. 

stimulation of, 75. 

tumor of, 225. 
Splenic artery, 223. 

fever, 280. 

hydatid cyst, 225. 

hypertrophy, 224. 

nerves, 223. 

vein, 223. 
Splenitis, 223. 
Spondylitis, 451. 
Spongiosum, corpus, 509. 
Spontaneous bleeding,' SOS. 
Spotted fever, 262. 
Sprains, 401. 
Stammering, 383. 
Stenosis, tracheal, '424. 
Stiff joints, 461. 

neck, 296. 
Still, Dr., 27. 
Stimulation of liver, 203. 

of pneumogastric, 84, (cut, 161). 

of splanchnic, 136, 154. 

of spleen, 75. 

of vagus, 136, 140. 

of vaso-motor, 254. 
Stimuli, mechanical, 23. , 
Stomach, 132. 

cancer of, 164. 

center for contracting, 136. 

cramp in, 181, 328. 

diseases of, 146. 

dilatation of, 163. 

motor center of, 136. 

movement, churning, 134. 
peristalsis, 135. 

neuralgia of, 160. 

trouble, 44, 156. 

dislocations in, 145. 

examination in, 145. 

ulcer of, 164. 
Stomatitis, aphthous, 430. 

catarrhal, 430. 

gangrenous, 431. 

materna, 432. 

mercurial, 432. 

parasitic, 431. 

ulcerative, 431. 
Stone in bladder, 441. 

in nose, 412. 
Strabismus, 402. 
Strength of osteopathic treatment, 

112. 
Stretching, muscles, abductor, 203. 
intercostal, 95. 

nerves, sciatic, 329. ^ 
Stricture, esophageal, 426. ^ 

K. Vitus' dance, 365. 
Sun-pain, 322. 
Sunstroke, 257. 
Suppurative coxalgia, 459. 

pancreatitis, 221. 
Swamp-sickness, 280. 
Sweat, excessive, 436. 
Swelling, white, 460. 
Swelling, dropsical, 125. 
Sycosis, 436. 



INDBl. 



565 



Symmetrical gangrene. 370. 
Sympathetic nerve, (cut, 141), 254. 

system, 21, 22. 
Synovitis, 458. 
Syphilis, 282. 

laryngeal, 421. 
Syringomyelia, 342. 
Systemic circulation, 45. 



Treatment in, cases, acute, 35. 
chronic. 35. 

dangerous during pregnancy, 33. 

of diseases of heart, principles 
in. 111. 
organs of respiration, 56. 

to equalize circulation, 114. 

frequency of, 43. 

cases, in acute, 32. 
in chronic, 32. 

general, 306. 

of neck, (cuts, 389, 391), 393. 

spinal, (cut, 73). 

strength used in, 112. 116. 

time required for, 43. 
Trembles, the, 280. 
Tremens, delirium, 382. 
Trichina spiralis, 190. 
Trichinosis, 280. 
Trismus, 376. 
Trunk, lymphatic, right, 129. 

nerves to, vaso-motor, 254. 
Tubercular meningitis, cerebral, 354. 
Tuberculosis, 278. 

disseminating, 84. 

intestinal, 190. 

miliary, acute, 84. 

peritoneal, 193. 

pulmonary, 68. 

renal, 249. 
Tuberculous lar\-ngitis, 417. 
Tubes, bronchial, inflammation of, 
75. 

Fallopian, 513. 
Tumor, 45. 

cerebral, 356. 

fleshy, 310. 

of kidney, 249. 

larj^ngeai, 420. 
• nasal, 413. 

of a nerve, 324. 

ovarian, 489. 

spinal, 341. 

of spleen, 225. 

uterine' fibroid, 485. 
Furbingfted bones, hypertrophy of, 

408. 
Turned rib, 150, 153. 
Typhlitis. 187. 
Typhoid fever, 19, 265. 
■typhus fever, 264. 
Tying cord, 5r9. 

U 
Ulcer, gastric, 164. 
glossal, 429. 



nasal, 413. 

rectal, 448. 
Ulcerative stomatitis, 431. 

vaginitis, 492. 
Upper extremitis. t'.ie, vaso-motor 

nerves to, 254. 
Uremia, 237. 
Urethrte, prolapsus, 502. 
Urethral caruncle, 501. 
Urine accumulation, 439. 

albumin in, 233. 

blood in, 234. 

calcium oxalate in, 237. 

deficiency of, 232. 

evacuation of, nerves concerned 
in, 440. 

fat in, 235. 

hemoglobin in, 235. 

incontinence of, 443. 

milky, 234. 

pus in, 236. 

retention of, 442. 

nerves concerned in, 440. 
Uric acid, excess of, 199. 
Uterine atrophy, 485. 

carcinoma, 486. 

catarrh. 480. 

hemorrhage, 447. 

malformation, 481. 

polyptis, 486. 

sarcoma, 487. 

tumor, fibroid, 485. 
Uterus, 463, 513. 

anteflexion of, 466, 468, 472. 

anteversion of, 465. 

blood-vessels of, 465. 

cavity of, 465. 

cervix of, 464. 

descent of, in labor, 522. 

displacements of, 466. 

erection of, 519. 

inversion of. 466, 467, 474. 

ligaments of, 464. 

during menstruation, 465. 

nerves of, 465. 

procidentia, 466. 

prolapsus of, 466, 474. 

at puberty, 465, 

relaxation of, 466. 

retroflexion of, 466, 468, 473. 

retroversion of, 466, 467, 472. 

V 

Vagi, stimulation of, 136, 140. 
Vagina, 512. 

dilatation of, in labor, 525. 

occlusion of, 503. 

orifice of, 512. 

prolapse of, 467. 
Vaginse, atresia, 503. 

prolapsus, 503. 
Vaginal, vulvo-, gland, cyst of, 495. 

entero-, hernia, 503. 

hernia, 503. 

recto-, fistula, 500. 
hernia, 503. 



566 



INDEX. 



vesico-, fistula, 500. 

hernia, 503. 
vulvo-, gland, abscess of, 495. 
Vaginismus, 498. 

Vaginitis, catarriial, simple, 489. 
diphtheritic, 492. 
granular, 491. 
specific, 492. 
ulcerative, 492. 
Valvular disease of the heart, 117. 

incompetency, 117. 
Valvulitis, 117. 
Varicella, 271. 
Varicose veins, 123. 
Variola, 270. 
Varix, 123. 

Vaso-motor, 32, 112, 116. 
causes, paralysis ot, 255. 

stimulation of, 254. 
center, 253. 
centers, 22. 
coryza, periodic, 2b'0. 
fibers, 21. 
nerves to eye, 254. 

extremities, upper, 254. 

lower, 254. 
intestines, 254. 
lungs, 254. 
tongue, 254. 
trunk, 254. 

viscera, abdominal, 254. 
pressure on, 59, (cuts, 101, 319). 
Vein, bronchial, 55. 
constriction of, 18. 
inflammation of, 124. 
portal, 196. 

branches of, 197. 
pressure on a, HI. 
splenic, 223. 
Veins, 111. 

pulmonary, 54. 
varicose, 123. 
Vermiform appendix, inflammation 

of, 184. 
Vertebrae, dislocation of, lumbar, 

470. 
Vertigo, aural, 405. 
cardiac, 118. 
gastric, 166. 
'sical calculus, 441. 
neoplasm, 442. 
Vesicles, Graafian, 515. 
Vesico-vaginal fistula, 500. 
hernia, 503. 

vessels, great, (cut, 107). 
Vibration, 34, 36, (cut, 57), 59, 67, 75. 
Vomiting, 137, 181, 328. 
center for, 138. 
produced by, 138. 



Vulvae, pruritus, 498. 
Vulvar eczema, 496. 
erythema, 497. 
erysipelas, 497. 
Vulvitis, catarrhal, acute, 493. 
chronic, 493. 
diphtheritic, 494. 
follicular, 494. 
gangrenous, 495. 
phlegmonous, 493. 
Vulvo-vaginal gland, abscess of, 
495. 
cyst of, 495. 

W 
Washerwoman's scall, 436. 
Washing child, 531. 
Water skull, 366. 
Water-bag, 524 . 
Water-blebs, 436. 
Waxy liver, 249. 
Weak back, 298. 
Weakened action of liver, 149. 

peristalsis, 149. 
Web, 400. 

Weil's disease, 266. 
Wetting, bed-, 443. 
White blood, 131. 

blood-corpuscles, 19. 

swelling, 460. 
Whites, the, 480. 
Whitlow, 435. 
Whooping-cough, 269. 
Wirsung. duct of, 216. 
Womb, falling of, 466. 
Women, diseases of, and Osteoivi- 

thy, 531. 
Worm, face-, 436. 

flesh-, disease, 280. 

ring-, 436. 
Worms, round-, 190. 

tape-, 190. 
Writer's cramp, 370, (cut, 377). 
Wryneck, 296. 



Xeroderma, 436. 



Yellow atrophy, acute, 207. 
fever, 266. 



Zoster, herpes, 4SG. 



national ^chool and InfiMai'i] 
of Ogteopatshij. 

415-16-17-18 Keith & Perry BuildiQg. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 



Incorporated under tlie laws of the State of Kansas, 1895. 
Incorporated under the laws of the State of Missouri, 1897. 



TUITION: 

Full Course, four terms of five months each, = $300.00 
Post=graduate Course, = = = = 150.00 

Special rates will be made to students or physicians de- 
siring short course in special studies. 

Regular term begins March and October of each year. 

Text-books used: Gray's Anatomy, Landois' Physiology, 
Potter's Quiz Compends of Anatomy, Musser's Diagnosis, 
Saunders' Gynecology, Saunders' Obstetrics, and Barber's 
Osteopathy Complete. 

M.D.'s may enter the class the first of any month. 

Tuition payable in advance, either in cash or bankable 
paper. 

Terms for treatment, $25.00 per month, strictly in 
advance. 

Two weeks' treatment, $15.00. 

Single treatment, $2.50. 

Consultation and examination, free. 

B. D. BARBBR, D.O., President. 
A. I,. BARBBR, D.O., Secretary. 



OSTEOPATHY, 

THE NEW SCIENCE OF DRUGLESS HEALING. 

176 pages, fully illustrated. First book ever written on the 
subject. Price, $3.00. 



OSTEOPATHY COMPLETE. 

Second book written on the subject. 600 pages, fully illus- 
trated. Containing all the latest discoveries. 
Price, $10.00. 



THE KANSAS CITY 
OSTEOPATHIC JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE 

National School and Infirmary of Osteopathy, 

Kansas City, Mo. 



This journal is not a mere advertising sheet, but will be 
devoted to placing Osteopathy before the world in its true 
light. A special feature will be the publication, each month, 
of new and important discoveries. 

All Osteopaths are invited to contribute. 

Subscription price, $1.00 per year, strictly in advance. 

All communications should be addressed to 

DR. E. D. BARBER, 

415-18 Keith & Perry Bldg., 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 




CM 
CO 



oo 









0) 










a 










W 


• 








U 


0) 








<D 


■p 








> 


(U 








d) 


H 








ft 


& 








U 


o 








5J 


o 








^ 


!>s 








w 


+3 




o 




«% 


cd 


c 


o 




^ 


rt 


.J 


-=^ 




(U 


o 


On 


coco 


p 


(U 




r\i 


ON 


u 


-p 


1 — 




CO 


03 


CO 


w 


H 


m 


o 




III 

ca 

uj 

!< 



osteopathy I Ilustrated 




Is a handsomely bound book con- 
taining nearly goo pages of reading 
matter with 90 full page plates from 
photographs illustrating and explain- 
ing the various methods of giving 
special Osteopathic treatments. 

Price $10.00 Postpaid. 

This book is -what the people 
■want; -what the physician 
must have; the revelation of 
the science of Osteopathy 
stripped of its pretended mys- 
teriousness and diflQculty. 



A. P. DAVIS, M. D., D. O. 

The reader may learn Osteop athy at his own fireside, practice it in his own family suc- 
jsfully, and arrest little ills, that, if let run culminate in malignant diseases, by simply ap- 
fing the principles laid down in this book, as each and every movement and manipuhuion, 
th a concise description, is contained in the book, with full page plates of each manipula- 
m, and the various diseases briefly, but minutely described, so that the reader i^ thoroughly 
formed when and where and how to treat each and every known condition called disease, 
le hundred of such plates are found in this book, photog'raphed, so that every shade of each 
ithod of treatment is fully shown. The Philosophy of the science is brought out in a most 
orough manner so that all mvstery is eliminated and the science stands out in bold relief, 
;ar as the noon-day sun at meridian height. Dr. Davis, the author, has had ample exper- 
nce along all lines ot healing, so that his ideas are not prejudiced, nor are his declarations 
emature, but the result of years of close study and careful, unprejudiced investigation, having 
:en intimately familiar witti all that pertains to this science, its first appearance, and beina: a 
udent and teacher in the first Osteopathic school ever taug-ht, and fully able to comprehend 
; magnitude, far-reaching philosophy. What he has said in this book can be relied upon as 
)ming straight from "the shoulder" of his intellectual and active mentality, and the reader 
ill have a rare treat reading and studying Osteopathy in all of its bearings and relationship 
1 the treatment of pathological conditions. No book on Osteopathy ever published contains a 
the of the intelligence this one does, nor was there ever a book published that made a science 
lainer, nor contained more fully the whole sc ience it purports to teach than this one does. The 
rinciples taught, when applied fit the reader for treating all varieties of disease in as cien- 
fic, intelligent manner. 

We believe that it will entirely revolutionize the whole practice of the healing art. It is 
practice of healing wherein manipulations with the hands adjust the various parts of the 
ody so that pressure is removed that causes obstruction to the freedom of the circulation of the 
arious fluids of the body, and freeing muscular contracture, nerve pressure, etc., thereby co- 
rdinating every part of the physical system with every other part, so that harmony is restored, 
ealth re-established, if lost. It is the simplest, easiest, least harmful of all methods of manip- 
latory treatment heretofore known and practiced. 

The book may be obtained at the regular price (10.00) of the author, Dr, A. P. Davis, 
'hicago, Illinois. Money must accompany the orders for book. No book sent ■without being 
irepaid. Do not send personal checks, but send Drafts, Express Orders or PostofBce Money 
Orders, and the book will be sent prepaid to your nearest express office. Address all orders 
o the author. 



1204-5 riasonic Temple, 



A. P. DAYIS, M. 1)., D. 0. 



CHICAQO, ILLINOIS. 



OSTEOPATHIC TREATMENT 



may be had at 1204-5 Masonic Temple by Dr. A. P. Davis, M. D., D. O., the author of "Osteo- 
pathy Illustrated,' ' who surely is the most scientific manipulator, and knows more Osteopathy 
and better how to apply it, teach it and explain it than any living man. Hours from 9 a, m. to 
13 m. and 1:30 to 4 p. m. and at his residence evenings till 7:30. All treatment done with no 
other agencies than the hands. No medicines used iDy hira. Although a graduate of the Ta- 
rious schools and sciences he treats simply with the hands.